0
votes
2answers
62 views

Is it possible to say so very and very so?

I know that it is correct to use: Thank you so very much. As much as I know an adverb can be theoretically used to modify another adverb, so my question is: Is it possible to say very so ...
3
votes
1answer
82 views

“X is not dead, it just smells so” [closed]

From what I've found the typical form of this phrase is X is not dead, it just smells that way. Can "that way" be replaced with a so in such a position? X is not dead, it just smells so.
3
votes
1answer
117 views

Is this Adverbial a complement or an adjunct?

According to Wiki, Adverbials are typically divided into four classes: adverbial complements (i.e. obligatory adverbial) are adverbials that render a sentence ungrammatical and meaningless if ...
0
votes
4answers
119 views

Position of “yet” in a causative sentence

If I have to write a causative sentence in Present Perfect, where should I put yet, at the end of the question or right after the negation? She hasn't had her doors mended by the carpenter yet. ...
-1
votes
2answers
68 views

“I am a degree holder now” or “I am now a degree holder” [duplicate]

Which one is correct? I am a degree holder now. I am now a degree holder.
1
vote
1answer
51 views

The recognition of the word “Enough”

I came across a sentence and had bugged me ever since. I cannot identify whether the word "Enough" is an adjective, a pronoun, a determiner or an adverb although I highly suspect that is an adjective ...
0
votes
4answers
196 views

Is it right to say “before since”?

I wonder if "before since" is right in my sentence. If not, could you please help me improve it? This company provides products since 2010. Consequently, there is no record of this product before ...
4
votes
1answer
527 views

Is it more correct to say “You have not yet <actioned>” or “You have not <actioned> yet”?

Having seen Correct placing and usage of "yet", it sounds like it may be correct to say either "You have not created any items yet." or "You have not yet created any items." Is one more ...
3
votes
2answers
669 views

The position of “always” in different sentences [closed]

I want to know about the position of always in different sentences. For example: Always she is tidy and on time. Is it correct or not?
0
votes
5answers
472 views

Is “almost exactly” correct English?

Is the collocation "almost exactly" grammatical, when one is trying to express that something is almost at the edge of being exact? E.g.: ...and it's almost exactly like...
0
votes
1answer
578 views

has just had or just had a baby

My question is not whether the correct grammar is either "She has just had a baby" or "She just had a baby". I am aware that the official grammar is "She has just had a baby". But in a way that ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Which is correct “increasingly easy” or “increasingly easier” [duplicate]

I was wondering which of the following is correct increasingly easy or increasingly easier. I had a notion that increasingly easier is correct since we are comparing with the past. However, this and ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

“They had already decided what to do” vs. “they had decided what to do already”

I was surprised that they had already decided what to do. I was surprised that they had decided what to do already. Which sentence is correct?
0
votes
1answer
271 views

Do all variations of this sentence seem grammatically correct? [duplicate]

There is an interesting English sentence which is making rounds in the social media nowadays. It goes like this: For the following sentence, add the word "only" anywhere in this sentence, and ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“There are still problems” vs. “there still are problems”

There are still problems. There still are problems. Is one word order more correct than the other and do they have identical meaning?
-2
votes
3answers
6k views

Alternative to the incorrect “I'm doing great”?

Since 'great' is an adjective, "I'm doing great" seems to be incorrect. It should be: "I'm doing (adverb)." You could say "I'm doing well." Could you also say "I'm doing greatly."?
2
votes
1answer
600 views

Inversion with “many times” at the beginning of a sentence

I am having a discussion with my friend. I said, "Many times I have seen him washing his car." He says it should be, "Many times have I seen him washing his car. Much like "Often do I see him", and ...
0
votes
2answers
311 views

Short sentence with adjective and adverb

I think that this is a problem of the usage of adjectives and adverbs (that's why I chose this title): I have a sentence in my presentation, which clarifies that a procedure uses only observations ...
0
votes
1answer
172 views

Is this an appropriate usage of “but” at the beginning of a sentence? [duplicate]

I try my best to use proper sentence construction and punctuation, and for my amusement, I've taken the quest to find meaningful situations where one might use the various conjunctions at the ...
1
vote
2answers
133 views

Why is “till” used in this expression: “If we don't leave till after lunch…”?

If we don't leave till after lunch we'll be cutting it very fine. I understand it to mean: "If we don't leave after lunch, we'll be cutting it very fine." (In the event of our not leaving ...
1
vote
1answer
151 views

Grammatical role of “kind of” [closed]

I would like to know what the grammatical construct "kind of + v" is? I kind of like cold weather or I kind of eat everything".
0
votes
3answers
2k views

“Recently” vs. “lately”

I haven't seen Mr. John __. Which is correct, recently or lately? My uncle has been to Germany lately. Why is the correct answer in the second example lately and not recently?
1
vote
2answers
782 views

'Statistically significant associated to' — [Adv + Adj] as Adv?

Is 'XXX is statistically significant associated to YYY.' grammatically correct ? One of my friends says this is seen in many papers with statistics. Shouldn't it be '... statistically significantly ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

“Talk to you then then”

I am talking to a friend on the phone and the conversation is somewhat incomplete but we decide to hang up. Before hanging up, he says "I'll see you tomorrow". Would it be grammatical to reply, ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Which one is correct, 'I like this more' or 'I like this better'? [duplicate]

I feel that using 'I like this name more' is more correct than 'I like this name better'. Since English is not my mother tongue, I am not sure.
-1
votes
1answer
560 views

“more people becoming increasingly xxx” or “more people increasingly becoming xxx”

I need a bit of guidance regarding the following sentence. Which of the three variants is grammatical? Are more people becoming increasingly intolerant? Are more people increasingly becoming ...
0
votes
2answers
492 views

“Sometimes also” or “also sometimes”?

I have a sentence where I think I could use either of these two constructions. They seem very similar in meaning, so I'm not sure which I should prefer. There might be some subtle point of grammar ...
1
vote
1answer
606 views

Is “in about” grammatical in “I'll reach there in about 5 minutes”?

Is it correct to say "I'll reach there in about 5 minutes?" Is "in about" correct in this sentence?
8
votes
5answers
844 views

Indian English use of “only”

I am from Bangalore and people here tend use the word only to emphasise something in a sentence. For example: We are getting that only printed. What is the proper way to put it?
1
vote
1answer
15k views

“Yet” at the beginning of a sentence

Can one use "Yet" at the beginning of a sentence as follows? Yet, he came late. Is this grammatical?
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Use of “yet another” in the middle of a sentence

Is the usage of yet another correct in the following sentence? This sentence might need yet another piece of work for you! Where can I place yet another in a sentence?
-1
votes
3answers
77 views

“Move slower” vs. “move less”

What is the proper word to fill the blank? The more cars there are on a given road, the __ the traffic will move. The answer is slower. But I wonder whether less is incorrect.
1
vote
4answers
3k views

“First off” vs “first”

First off we need to write down a word; second we need... First we need to write down a word; second we need... What's the subtle difference between "first off" and "first"? Moreover, ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Correct usage of “yet” in the middle of the sentence [closed]

Is the following sentence a correct usage of yet? I'm someone like you, and yet like no one. I think it matches the last definition of OAAD, more importantly. But I also think the comma and and ...
0
votes
2answers
316 views

Grammaticality of “I have a car, neither does Sara” [closed]

Can we say "I have a red car. Neither does Sara." or must we say "I have a red car but Sara doesn't."? I have read this on a website and they said that the first sentence is incorrect but I don't ...
1
vote
3answers
519 views

“I was really thinking” vs. “I really was thinking”

Which one of the following is correct? I was really thinking to do that. I really was thinking to do that.
0
votes
1answer
673 views

“Enables you to quickly and easily identify” vs. “enables you to identify quickly and easily” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? I'm currently having a bit of a dispute and would appreciate your help please. Which one is ...
3
votes
5answers
410 views

“Will shortly appear automatically” — what is the correct order of words in this fragment?

I want to say that an answer will appear shortly, and automatically, on the screen. I'm not sure whether the correct sentence is: The answer will shortly appear automatically. or maybe: The ...
-2
votes
2answers
156 views

“I need to wash my hands bad[ly]” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you” I'm terrible at the usage of bad vs. badly. Given the sentence: I need to wash my hands bad[ly]. Should the ...
3
votes
1answer
257 views

Positioning “only” in “I have worked with X” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” Which of the following sentences are correct? I have worked with only Mr. X. I have worked only with Mr. X. I have only worked with ...
4
votes
5answers
2k views

“How best to handle” vs. “how to best handle”

Are there rules on the placement of 'best'? They are deciding how to best handle the matter. They are deciding how best to handle the matter. Is one of them wrong?
4
votes
2answers
834 views

“I have been keeping ignoring you.”

Does this make any sense? I have been keeping ignoring you. Besides that it sounds awkward, my Chinese buddy who knows more grammar rules than I care to list said that the phrase is ...
0
votes
3answers
6k views

'of yet' and 'as of yet'

Can ‘of yet’ be used with the same meaning of ‘as of yet’? For example: Most importantly, he’s found footprints of dinosaurs that we haven’t found bones of yet. Does this mean the same thing as ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

“You should have also named” vs. “you should also have named”

Out of the two sentences, which one is correct? You should have also named it the Daily prophet. You should also have named it the Daily prophet. My guess is it's the first one.
5
votes
3answers
1k views

is “purposely” an actual word? [closed]

I grew up in Malaysia and Singapore, and it's taken me a long time to dissect my vocabulary into "local slang, incomprehensible/incorrect elsewhere" and "proper English". 'Purposely' is one of those ...
-2
votes
3answers
2k views

More grammatically correct: “anything but” or “anything except”?

Could you tell me which of these phrases is grammatically correct — "anything but" or "anything except"? If the use depends on context, what are the instances when each must be preferred?
0
votes
1answer
540 views

“Partially correct” vs. “partial correct” [closed]

It's partially correct. It's partial correct. Which of the following is grammatical?
3
votes
3answers
882 views

Is “five-yearly” an acceptable usage of an adverb of manner in British English?

Today's BBC News web page has this headline: New era of five-yearly doctor checks starts There's a word that means "five-yearly": quinquennial. It's probably too long for headline writers and ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

“Every” being used instead of “ever”?

Occasionally I'll see a comment on the internet along the lines of I don't think I have every heard of such a thing. Maybe not exactly that, but something equivalent where I would think that ...
1
vote
2answers
98 views

“Far enough removed” vs. “far removed enough” vs. “removed far enough”

Which of the following word orders is grammatical? Games based on real life are sometimes not far enough removed. Games based on real life are sometimes not far removed enough. Games based ...