Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Can I say “Being walking down the street, I met my old friend.”?

I know walking down the street, I met my old friend is much better. I just wonder if the sentence is grammatically incorrect, or it's acceptable like in the case of passive participles as below. ...
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0answers
20 views

attributable adjective

Is there not a rule that a particular noun (some nouns) can have only certain adjectives. For example : "strong source" seems incorrect to me. Can you suggest a better adjective for the noun "source". ...
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0answers
23 views

How do you correctly say “not only did he/she do X, he/she also did Y”? [on hold]

How do you correctly write this sentence? By persevering, Pai has not only achieved her ambition, but she has won back her grandfather's love.
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1answer
60 views

Is “Are you there only ?” grammatically correct?

My friend sent me this. I'm wondering if it is correct. What is the use of "only" here ?
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1answer
24 views

does this sentence make grammatical sense

Koreans apparently demand their films make them cry by the end, and this film explores new realms of melodrama I didn't know existed. ...does that sentence make sense?
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2answers
48 views

“When will you come” vs. “When are you coming”? [on hold]

One of my friends will come to my city "Ahmedabad" on 18th May 2015. In a WhatsApp group chat, my friend asked him, "When are you coming to Ahmedabad?" I corrected my friend: "When will ...
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3answers
101 views

Is it correct to use “me” or “I” here? [duplicate]

Thank you for initiating the opportunity for Bob and me to talk.
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0answers
25 views

Ending a letter [on hold]

In ending a letter, which is more appropriate? "The Foundation is indeed appreciate your support over the previous years" "The Foundation appreciated you support ..." "The Foundation is indeed ...
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25 views

fill in the blank using correct option [closed]

How much longer_______this book. A-) you are needing. B-) will you be needing. C-) will you have needed. D-) have you needed.
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1answer
70 views

Why is encourageable not a word? [closed]

What are general rules of thumb for creating adjectives with -able? I wanted to denote an object as having an ability to be encouraged, but "encourageable" and "encouragable" both are yielded as ...
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1answer
42 views

Laugh to world to world laugh to you is grammatical [on hold]

I want to know this statement is grammatical? Laugh to world to world laugh to you I had this statements too: Laugh to world then world will laugh to you. & World will laugh to you ...
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1answer
49 views

why is it wrong to say: “Nowadays women have a considerable more role.” [closed]

Is it wrong to say: "Nowadays women have a considerable more role." Grammatically speaking why exactly is it wrong?
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2answers
27 views

Consistency between noun and verb [closed]

Which one of the following is grammatically correct? 1. Individual prisoners are directed to their respective cell 2. Individual prisoners is directed to his/her respective cell
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1answer
41 views

How to form possessive from “belongs to X (preposition) Y”

This is none's of us business. Everyone's in the room pockets were empty. The car isn't anyone's from this town. Are the sentences correct? If not, how should they be phrased correctly?
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1answer
56 views

“I'll be upset with someone”: Is this sentence (a) acceptable (b) idiomatic? [on hold]

I saw someone post on Facebook "I'll be upset with someone". Is there a better way to say this?
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4answers
704 views
+300

“Wrote it I did” Is this grammatical?

Are the following two examples grammatical? Write it I have. Wrote it I did. Consider as possible contexts: They said that I have to write it, and write it I have. -- (for #1) They ...
5
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1answer
96 views

“I guess Americans are hated a lot of places.” What's wrong with this sentence exactly?

From Cat's Cradle (Vonnegut). "The highest possible form of treason," said Minton, "is to say that Americans aren't loved wherever they go, whatever they do. Claire tried to make the point the ...
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0answers
38 views

Usage of “Science and technology” as a singular term [duplicate]

Should we use singular verb with the subject/subjects "science and technology"? For example, Science and technology have a prominent influence in the modern world. Is this sentence correct? ...
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1answer
32 views

Is the phrase “horizon road” grammatically correct? [closed]

Is the phrase "horizon road" grammatically correct, and if so, is it equal to "road to horizon"?
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1answer
39 views

Can I use “too” at the end of a sentence? [closed]

Can I use "too" at the end of a sentence? For example: They will guide in your interaction with family, friends, associates and loved-ones in a way that is healthy for you and all that you are ...
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2answers
44 views

Suggest to or Suggest

Do I say I suggest you not go there. or I suggest you to not go there.? Or are they complete wrong, needing to say going? Thanks
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1answer
80 views

Can I say “more funny” or “most funny” instead of “funnier” or “funniest”?

Could you please provide a reference to your answer whatever it is? I know that "funnier" and "funniest" are more correct, but I want to know whether the less common versions are considered errors or ...
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1answer
38 views

'within few next days' OR 'within next few days'?

Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct? and why? The project will be completed within next few days. OR The project will be completed within few next days.
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3answers
76 views

Ordered it Offline vs Ordered it Online

I'm new to this site so i don't know the proper formatting for questions here. My friends and I were having a debate whether or not saying "I ordered it offline" was a correct way to say "I ordered ...
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1answer
54 views

“Take/Consider … as an example” vs “Take/Consider … for example”

For more than a decade, I have always seen/used the phrase "Take/Consider ... as an example" followed by a comma. Then, my recent visit on this page got me confused and raised more questions in me. ...
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2answers
47 views

Can we use patient as a verb?

Patienter is verb in French for to be patient. Why can't we have a verb too. It should be pronounced as in French - peshi-ent. Sentence: Could you please patient another week for your payment?
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1answer
80 views

Is the use of the positive anymore considered correct?

While the word anymore is usually a negative context, the positive anymore is a well-documented phenomenon. I found this surprising, because I had never come across the positive anymore in a ...
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1answer
75 views

The grammar behind 'above mentioned'

A colleague of mine wrote the following sentence: I have worked on the below mentioned issues: Now, I'm not a native speaker, and certainly not an authority on grammar. I construct sentences ...
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1answer
57 views

Would it be 'meet' or 'have met' in this structure?

If I bumped into someone, who happened to be called John, yesterday, and I am telling someone else of the encounter, would I say: I happened to meet John yesterday. or I happened to have ...
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1answer
82 views

a few days every month usage

"A few days every month, he goes cycling." Is the noun phrase "a few days every month" acting as an adverb to "goes" in the above sentence? There is no preposition before the noun phrase "a few ...
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1answer
112 views

Why areN'T 'not least' and 'notably' interchangeable?

The example is taken from page 1 of this PDF ; The National Admissions Test for Law (LNAT): You may find, however, that answering one question helps you answer the next, not least for the purposes ...
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1answer
304 views

Can 'must' be used in a negative question?

Is it proper to write negative questions this way? You mustn't watch too much TV, must you?
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1answer
18k views

How do I use “as of now” correctly?

Just to clarify, I am not a native English speaker. I occasionally hear from other non-native English speakers the use of the phrase: "As of now" with the meaning of Currently. Initially I did not ...
0
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1answer
96 views

Something happens because clause A, and clause B.

I wonder whether because can introduce two or even more reasons; if yes, how they are connected. For example, John came late because he woke up late, and his bicycle was broken. Is the sentence ...
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3answers
450 views

The use of nominative “whom”

From page 48 of Law: A Very Short Introduction, by Raymond Wacks: In other words, you owe a duty to persons whom it is foreseeable are likely to be harmed by your conduct. To try to parse this, ...
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10answers
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Why is the sentence “She sighed, and began whispering again” grammatically incorrect?

That's a line from a Twilight book. It's a grammar mistake pointed out by this website. She sighed, and began whispering again. I don't see anything wrong with it. Is the comma the mistake?
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4answers
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Check the grammar for “returned back”

Is there an error in this sentence? When Darun heard the news that his father had been hospitalised he cancelled his trip and returned back to his village. I think the error is 'back' but I need ...
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5answers
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Punctuation for the phrase “including but not limited to”

This is my first question on this stack exchange. I'm hoping this kind of question is welcome here, and excuse my ignorance, but my confusion evident below is exactly why I am a Software Engineer ...
7
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1answer
8k views

Controversy over verb choice in “neither you nor I {is/am/are} in control”

I was watching the film A Game of Shadows starring Robert Downey Junior and Jude law when this line came up, "...neither you nor I is in control..." (I can’t remember the exact words that ended the ...
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2answers
16k views

“Is used” vs. “has been used” vs. “was used”

I have three sentences of which I'm not sure which one is grammatical, and why. It refers to the Eiffel Tower. It is used as the symbol of Paris and of France for over a century. It was ...
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2answers
314 views

Is a bare infinitive acceptable as the object of a verb? [duplicate]

I came upon the phrase, "writing helps develop a child analytically thinking." Is this grammatically correct? Is it OK to use just develop instead of to develop?
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2answers
811 views

Identify the subject, object and verb

In the sentence below I want to confirm whether I have correctly identified the subject, object and the verb (It's a sentence I made up as an example and hope it's correct, and if not please correct ...
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2answers
4k views

Is “make due” now considered acceptable?

Whilst plodding through Patrick Rothfuss' "The Name of the Wind", I came across: Our dinner was nowhere near as grand as last night's. We made due with the last of my now-stale flatbread, dried ...
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1answer
2k views

“overly confident” vs “over confident”

I hear or read both phrases regularly, and they seem to have the same meaning to me. But do they have different meanings? Or is “overly confident” even grammatically correct?
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4answers
27k views

“One of my friends” vs. “one of my friend”

Which of the following is correct? Yesterday, I met one of my friends. Yesterday, I met one of my friend.
5
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4answers
421 views

Do I have to use the auxiliary before all the verbs?

Which of the following is correct? I will dance and sing at the concert tonight. I will dance and will sing at the concert tonight. Does it happen with to, too? For example: I ...
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8answers
6k views

“I'm lovin' it”

How normal-sounding is the slogan "I'm lovin' it" to native ears? I know it sounded quite odd to me when I first heard it — and it still sometimes does —, but I can't even tell why. Sure, love is ...
42
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12answers
11k views

I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he?

Consider the sentence "I can run faster than 15 miles per hour." Its meaning is clear and to my eyes obviously grammatically correct. Now let me present some variations that have given me trouble for ...
58
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7answers
129k views

“If I was” or “If I were”. Which is more common, and which is correct?

My question of whether to use if I was or if I were. Which one is incorrect or nonstandard?
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8answers
8k views

Which is correct: “__ is different from __” or “__ is different than __”?

As someone who learned English later on in life, I was taught that different from is the correct grammar to use: this is different from that. However, it seems these days everyone uses different than ...