Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Literature: 'Why' at the beginning of sentences [duplicate]

I’m currently reading George Martin’s A Song Of Ice And Fire novels in English. As a non-native speaker (I’m German), I stumbled upon some grammatical constructs that I’ve never seen before, one of ...
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1answer
60 views

Is “I would understand everything you said if you said it in portuguese” correct?

Is it any kind of conditional? And if it is, can you tell me which one? As I wrote this I had the feeling that it should be "I would understand everything you say if you say it in portuguese" or "I ...
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2answers
72 views

“I have no idea what I'm doing”. Is this sentence correct? [on hold]

Because I don't know it just seems that something is missing despite knowing that nothing is missing. I keep wondering if it shouldn't be something like "I have no idea of what I'm doing" or something ...
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3answers
18 views

Uses of model perfect with a future event that was planned, but then cancelled

Can you say, "The meeting would have been tomorrow, but they cancelled it yesterday?"
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45 views

“Who is” vs. “Who are”

The beginning of a title reads, Who are doing. . . . which doesn’t sound correct to me. To me, Who is doing. . . . sounds more correct. Am I wrong, or can both be used in the beginning of a sentence ...
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27 views

Is there any difference between saying “for long” or just “long”?

For example: Is "Good sensation of freshness long after brushing" any different from "Good sensation of freshness for long after brushing?"
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39 views

We can say really big, and it makes the thing we're talking about bigger than the usual big. Is there a way of saying not so big? [migrated]

But I don't want to be saying "It is not that big" -> it is bigger, but smaller than the usual I want to know if there is a work of the same type as "really" that decreses the ammount of "bigness" ...
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1answer
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Is “Even I too.” a valid sentence?

Consider the following conversations: A: "I must leave now because I have to be home in 30 minutes." B: "Even I too." A: "I am getting bored." B: "Even I too." Is the response valid? I ...
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4answers
65 views

Order of words and punctuation in a sentence [on hold]

I am writing a sentence whose word order and punctuation has put me in a fix. Can I get some opinions on whether the construction is correct, grammatically? Ask him what becomes of the dogs he ...
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1answer
34 views

Functionality vs. Functionalities: are both correct pluralizations?

To me, inasmuch as use of the word functionality referring to software means the extent of its overall ability, I would write "The software implements the following functionality." However, I've seen ...
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13 views

sentences that show correct pronoun agreement [on hold]

Neither Claire nor Elise had her application completed in time to be considered by the university. is it correct
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30 views

wedding invite template [closed]

I sent the below wedding invite to few of my friends for proof reading Born unknown to each other, we are stepping into a new beginning of wedded life, with new dreams, new hopes, new aspirations ...
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53 views

What's the difference between “is done” vs “has been done” and “is to be done” vs “should be done”? [closed]

Please tell me the differences between the sentences below, and which sentence you think is the most idiomatic in English: What is to be done is done; there is no more to be done What is to ...
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2answers
95 views

Is this a correct English sentence: “I'm not quite well enough ready yet.”

I was talking to someone recently and blurted out as I had to move on to another task "I am not quite well enough ready yet" which sparked a discussion about if that was correct English. Although I'll ...
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2answers
47 views

I want the exact answer and difference between these two? [closed]

have you spoke to her (or) have you speak to her? Which is correct?
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0answers
45 views

i have only one sibling that is my elder brother [closed]

i have only one sibling that is my elder brother.
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2answers
142 views

In what dialects is “I don't like it too” grammatical?

Consider: Too — (adv.) also, as well, in addition. We don’t usually use too in negative clauses; we use either instead: I don’t like that kind of stuff. I don’t like it either. That said, ...
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2answers
67 views

Different between 'effect' and 'impact'

Someone asks me this question: 'How much work is it to fix issue? then I'm trying to determine potential impact.' My answer is that 'very little work should to be done to fix this issue. And there is ...
3
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1answer
52 views

Unless in third conditional sentences

"Jane wouldn't have found a job unless she had gone to London" is a natural-sounding sentence and has two different meanings, depending on whether Jane really did move to London or not: (1) "Jane ...
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0answers
16 views

When can a singular verb be used for multiple distinct subjects? [duplicate]

I've read "Are" vs. "is" with compound subjects and http://www.grammar.cl/Present/ThereIsThereAre.htm, so this doesn't duplicate, because here, the subjects are disparate. "The ...
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1answer
65 views

Is it grammatical to use “same” or “the same” in substitution for an objective pronoun?

I've seen and heard this usage of the pronoun "same" more than once, and it sounded strange to my ears: "Thank you for the book; I will return same shortly." "Wine production has increased, ...
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1answer
62 views

Can 'must' be used in a negative question?

Is it proper to write negative questions this way? You mustn't watch too much TV, must you?
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2answers
36 views

correct way of cooking

What is correct Sometimes I cook for myself or Sometimes I cook myself. This sounds like cooking self, which is not true. I've heard ( most of times ) people use second phrase. Which of the two ...
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2answers
85 views

Is this usage of 'of which' correct?

I'm working on an employee manual and I came across this one: "Our team philosophy is to become the best of which we are capable." Is this a correct sentence? The point it's trying to get across is ...
3
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1answer
113 views

Can a sentence end in “left”

Which is the correct phrase: You have 5 days left of your trial. or: You have 5 days of your trial left.
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1answer
21 views

Is the use of “Elysial” acceptable / correct? [closed]

Based on the following definition: elysian adj (Classical Myth & Legend) of or relating to Elysium delightful; glorious; blissful Collins English Dictionary – Complete ...
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2answers
62 views

Do I need to use a comma before “everyone” to set off the vocative? [duplicate]

While I was writing a status update today on social media I decided to do some grammar-learning. The status update was "Happy Labor Day everyone!" and I am now wondering if I should place a comma ...
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2answers
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I will drive into town… but I can't drive

My girlfriend messaged me earlier to say "I will drive into town with my mother". I thought this was odd, since she doesn't have a licence. Turns out she meant that her mother will be driving, and she ...
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29 views

'Make' vs. 'makes' in “this makes” and “this does make”? [duplicate]

In English grammar, to my understanding, it is incorrect to say "this does makes," but I'm not sure why (and nor does my mother, who is an editor). It is acceptable to say "this makes [sense]," and ...
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28 views

Can just a noun phrase be a complete list item? [closed]

In the following extract: [A number of issues had to be considered.] Firstly, the scope of her responsibilities. ... “the scope of her responsibilities” is just a noun phrase used as a ...
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1answer
57 views

Is there any difference between “like” and “as”?

Why is it not right to say: He speaks like his father does. But it’s quite correct to say: He speaks like his father. He speaks as his father does.
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1answer
92 views

How do I use “as of now” correctly?

Just to clarify, I am not a native English speaker. I occasionally hear from other non-native English speakers the use of the phrase: "As of now" with the meaning of Currently. Initially I did not ...
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44 views

“Do you want” vs “Do you not want”

I recently came across a funny picture with these questions: Do you want som drugs? No Do you not want some drugs? Presumably the answear is supposed to be "no" since you always say no to drugs, ...
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1answer
36 views

Do we have to mention the things we refer to after the word “one of these”

Do we have to mention the things we refer to after the word "one of these" For example.... "I have a lot of cars.One of these is BMW" "I have a lot of cars.One of these cars is BMW" Which one of ...
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What is the Grammatical mistakes in “The pity is that no sooner he had left the place than the fire broke out”? [closed]

What is/are the Grammatical mistakes in "The pity is that no sooner he had left the place than the fire broke out" ?
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1answer
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“And been” when “has” has been said in the sentence already?

I have the sentence "The role has gotten easier and easier to play, and been forced upon me more frequently than not." I was wondering if "and been" is correct to use in this case, or if "has" must be ...
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2answers
51 views

Lack intellectually or Lacking intellectually

I came across a phrase on the internet that seemed wrong (surprise): "[...] especially for those who lack intellectually." In my opinion, this should say "especially for those [who are] lacking ...
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1answer
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“I won't stay longer than I can help” or “longer than I can't help”?

I'm a non-native speaker of English and the following sentence makes me wonder: "I won't stay longer than I can help." I've heard similar uses of "can help" in other contexts and they all ...
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0answers
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Is it third person singular or plural? [duplicate]

Do I need to add a suffix -s to the verbs in the following cases? Her academic background combined with her working experience...provideS... Her academic and professional experience.. provideS... I ...
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1answer
42 views

Are these default questions about events correct grammatically? [closed]

As you can see below, I created some default questions which are supposed to ask about events that either have happened or will happen in future(the gaps will be filled by different events such as ...
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1answer
118 views

“New York is a great place to live.” (no preposition?)

New York is a great place to live. New York is a great place to live in. I've seen the former usage a lot and I've started wondering what the grammar aspects of it are. The main question ...
0
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1answer
53 views

Is this valid English: “it can help the learner generalize better”?

It sounds a bit off, but I am not sure if it valid or not. It was likely written by a native French speaker. After viewing the comments, I am including the full sentence: It has been shown to ...
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1answer
75 views

Usage of “to find out” [closed]

Your father climbed to some rough rocks near the coast to find out that under the rocks, our friend Lake lies severely wounded. Is this usage of "to find something by chance (as a result of ...
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1answer
39 views

A is more near to B than C (is or does)? [closed]

Which of the following sentences is correct? The approximate data values are much closer to the real data values than the original ones are. The approximate data values are much closer to the ...
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4answers
74 views

“In” + gerund: “Pip joins the procession in carrying the casket”

Pip joins the funeral procession, planned out by Mr. Trabb, the tailor, in carrying Mrs. Joe’s casket through town. Is this sentence grammatically correct? One of my teachers proofread my work, ...
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2answers
79 views

“The problem is he is stingy”

I have this sentence: The problem is he is very stingy with his money. But I feel it sounds weird or even wrong with the two ises so close. Is the sentence structure grammatical? If it isn't, ...
0
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1answer
97 views

Had been vs was

Now this is confusing.. I wanna know the difference between the following sentences: -If you were there, I would see you. -If you had been there, I would have seen you. What's the difference ...
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1answer
39 views

“In my career as” — is “as” correct here?

I have this fragment: ... the experience and knowledge gained will be helpful in my career as a neuropathologist. Is the "as" here okay? It somehow does not sound right to me. Obviously I want ...
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4answers
459 views

“I never went to poker yesterday” - Is this grammatically correct? [duplicate]

A colleague of mine often pulls me up on my awful grammar, earlier today I said "I never went to poker yesterday" and she told me that it was grammatically incorrect. I understand that I ...
0
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1answer
66 views

You and Me both

Which is correct: Me and Bob have both reviewed the fees. Bob and I have both reviewed the fees. I ask this because it sounds more grammatically correct to say Me and Bob when using the ...