Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Subject/Complement Agreement. How to describe problem with “The thing is the objects.”

In http://ell.stackexchange.com/questions/29140/is-or-are-the-only-thing-that-i-want-you-to-hit-right-now-is-are-the-books/29170#29170, I provided the following, problematic, wording (especially bold ...
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38 views

Is “Daily Sport Stream” grammatically correct as a website name? [on hold]

I want to register a certain domain name for my website. Is the name Daily Sport Stream acceptable? Or can I use only Daily Sport Streams?
22
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6answers
2k views

Can a person happen? Is “Zodanga happened” correct?

I was watching movie John Carter where there was some dialogue like this: — What happened here? — Zodanga happened. Here Zodanga was a bad guy in the movie. I don't understand how a guy ...
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1answer
65 views

Who is one God and the one Mediator? [on hold]

This is a passage from a book of the Bible: 1 Timothy Chapter 2 1 Exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men; ...
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1answer
36 views

Is ”what there is a reason to do” a valid construct?

From page 76 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: What there is a reason to do is different from what should be done, all things considered, just as what there is a right to do is ...
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1answer
77 views

Send versus sends; and has versus have [duplicate]

I did a simple online English test and got two incorrect answers. Could someone please either explain the reason behind these two grammatical mistakes, or direct me in the direction of the grammar ...
3
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1answer
79 views

“X is not dead, it just smells so” [on hold]

From what I've found the typical form of this phrase is X is not dead, it just smells that way. Can "that way" be replaced with a so in such a position? X is not dead, it just smells so.
13
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4answers
347 views

Is it grammatical to split either/or into different sentences?

I came across the following sentence in Wikipedia: The bitangent lines can be constructed either by constructing the homothetic centers, as described at that article, and then constructing the ...
2
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3answers
53 views

Is “for short” correct?

In conversation I used the phrase "for short" in the context: "I will call you blank for short." I know I've heard the phrase before, but I'm wondering if it is actually acceptable English? If ...
0
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2answers
92 views

Grammatical Voice Problem [closed]

"Can security be granted by an entity which is neither a borrower nor a guarantor? Yes, The third party may be granted if . . ..“ I don't understand what this sentence means. Who grants whom? To my ...
1
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3answers
63 views

Is “Are” always used with plural verbs/nouns? [duplicate]

Examples: There's six seasons, dude. Wouldn't it be: There're six seasons, dude. We are talking about multiple items; six seasons. If we refer to multiple items, we should use "Are" in ...
0
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2answers
64 views

Complex question starting with 'I wonder'

I want to ask about some plans, which I want to define in the question. And I want to start with I wonder. So something like: I wonder what the plans for the next steps regarding the topic we ...
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1answer
23 views

Comparison between two elements [duplicate]

When comparing two elements, should we use "more" or "most"? Example: "There are two locations, you can choose the more/the most convenient one."
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1answer
34 views

“This facility has/have a new administrator” [closed]

"This facility has a new administrator" — is this correct? Or should it be "this facility have a new administrator"?
0
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2answers
71 views

Am I using “suggest that” correctly?

I am writing to my manager. I want to suggest making a new service to her. I have problem with this sentence: Can you suggest to them that [Company Name] develops the Italian version of the ...
1
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1answer
54 views

Why is “in the catching of” wrong?

In this sentence, in the catching of is grammatically incorrect, but I cannot tell how: The new system, which uses remote cameras in the catching of speeding motorists, may undermine the police ...
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1answer
68 views

Use of “exist” in “Can there exist an uncountable planar graph?”

Can there exist an uncountable planar graph? This usage of exist bothers me. In this context, my understanding is that it is used as a replacement for be. That looks very strange to me. However, ...
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0answers
124 views

“Mistaken as” vs. “mistaken for”

I heard someone use the words mistaken as rather than mistaken for. Is this correct? If it is correct then what is the difference between the two? Is it ever wrong to use mistaken as, and if so, why? ...
2
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1answer
68 views

“Blue colour” or “Colour blue”

Recently I started learning english on busuu.com. In on of the elementary exercices "Colours", that I performed, the following phrase was stated as the correct answer: "I like the colour blue" ...
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2answers
66 views

Why do we say “write in” a journal instead of “write” journal?

I noticed that we always say "write in a journal" instead of simply "write a journal." Why is this?
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1answer
42 views

What would you say? [closed]

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? 'I smelled that our dinner was burning.' I don't think I've heard that 'smell' as a verb is followed by that-clause. What do you think?
3
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2answers
105 views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
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3answers
112 views

Is “A Midsummer’s Night’s Dream” correct English?

Shakespeare’s play is called A Midsummer Night’s Dream. So is A Midsummer’s Night’s Dream correct English? If not, what would be the correct English?
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2answers
56 views

Does “clandestine ignorance” make sense? [closed]

Does the following make sense, "clandestine ignorance"? I would like to see if anyone else is thinking the same way as to the meaning or definition as I do. Thanks.
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0answers
19 views

meant and mean both words are same meaning? [migrated]

which would be the correct use of the word in the two sentences below: I mean, I can do it!!! or I can do, I meant it Also, please explain why! Because I'm trying to improve my English usage of ...
0
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1answer
73 views

Can we use both British English and American English in the same article?

Can we use British English trends and American English trends (such as spelling, or turns of phrase) in different sentences in the one topic?
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2answers
34 views

Use of the word “panic-stricken” for self

which would be the correct use of the word "panic-stricken" in the two sentences below: I was panic-stricken at the thought of missing my trip to usa OR I got panic-stricken at the thought ...
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1answer
31 views

Can one use 'prepare' instead of 'be prepared' or 'be ready'?

a) - The document you requested will take four days to be ready. b) - The document you requested will take four days to prepare. Does (b) give the same meaning as (a)? Is this a correct way to use ...
2
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1answer
55 views

Is it grammatical to say of some potential meaning that it is “able to be said” or “trying to be said”?

A recent commenter on a recent word-search question nominated a term as “an even better word for what is trying to be said.” This seems to me to attribute intention to something—a ...
0
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2answers
44 views

Is this sentence correct grammatically? [closed]

Do you have any knowledge at photography? Is this sentence correct? I don't think so, the at doesn't sound right, but my friend says some grammar checker tells that its correct?
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2answers
50 views

Claim a stake or stake a claim?

Which of the following is a correct usage? CLAIM A STAKE or STAKE A CLAIM I am highly confused about these two. How to use them in sentences? Though the first one appears to be correct to ...
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1answer
21 views

Is “Write something also on. . . .” ok?

In the following sentence, is the usage of also considered grammatically correct, or is there something wrong with it? Write something also on an alternative approach to this problem; explain ...
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1answer
70 views

Is “likes nothing less” or “likes nothing more” correct?

He likes nothing less than an extremely sophisticated life. He likes nothing more than an extremely sophisticated life. Both look meaningfully similar. In the first one, 'less' appears to ...
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0answers
20 views

What is the gramatically correct form? [duplicate]

What is the gramatically correct form: "my mom and dad's house" or "my mom's and dad's house"?
0
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1answer
38 views

“Charge it by the blink” vs. “charge it in blinks”

Which of these sentences is grammatically and semantically more appropriate? Lawyers measure time and charge it by the blink. Lawyers measure time and charge it in blinks.
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23 views

“Page Not Found” - is it grammatically correct? [duplicate]

404 - Page Not Found Every time I see this error message, I think: is it grammatically correct? Because I have the feeling that the verb is missing.
8
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1answer
104 views

Why is my English “worlds better” than yours but never “the best by worlds”?

In speech when making comparisons we can say: It is far better than It's way better than It's miles better than It's worlds better than For instance, British restaurant food is ...
0
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1answer
58 views

The delivery may be accelerated?

I'm writing a quotation and have to estimate a delivery date. My estimate is that we will make the delivery at January 1st. However, this will be impacted by when the project starts. It is in our ...
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2answers
184 views

The use of “So X as to Y”

First of all, note that this is not a duplicate question of another one asking about the usage of so as to, since this one is asking about the structure of so . . . as to. . . . I understand this ...
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2answers
397 views

Does “then before, now once more” mean anything?

Does the phrase then before, now once more have any meaning in English? Or does it exist just because it rhymes so nicely? Or does it exist at all? Likewise, what about that time then, once again?
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2answers
119 views

I can speak a little bit of German

I was asked to introduce myself and what languages I spoke. So I mentioned all the languages I know and in the end, I added "... and I can speak a little bit of German" After I said that, I was ...
6
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2answers
140 views

Is this correct usage of “it's”?

I saw this in an English text, and I was wondering if the "it's" here is used correctly: The morality of it’s debatable but you can ... I would be inclined to write it as: The morality of it ...
3
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1answer
94 views

Is this Adverbial a complement or an adjunct?

According to Wiki, Adverbials are typically divided into four classes: adverbial complements (i.e. obligatory adverbial) are adverbials that render a sentence ungrammatical and meaningless if ...
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1answer
23 views

“The horizontal and vertical transfers” vs. “the horizontal and the vertical transfers” [duplicate]

The Horizontal and vertical tranfers in Local Governement Is this fragment grammatically correct?
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2answers
66 views

Difference between “all the” and simply “all” [duplicate]

In a mail from my professor, I read you need to specify all the fields. Here, he gave us a form with about 25 fields. He asked us to fill out the fields. I'm skeptical about the usage of the ...
3
votes
1answer
67 views

Are both “from the offset” and “from the outset” correct?

I had always seen that phrase as "from the outset", but recently I saw somebody writing "from the offset" (meaning "from the beginning"). Dictionary.com claims that "offset" can be a synonym for ...
6
votes
3answers
158 views

Why can’t you say “I fell the stairs”?

The verb to fall strongly implies the direction down, but in some circumstances it is obligatory (in StdAmEng) to include the word “down.” The example I have in mind right now is I fall down the ...
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3answers
101 views

Is “was always with you” or “had always been with you” grammatically correct?

In those days wherever you went I had always been with you like a shadow. In those days wherever you went I was always with you like a shadow. Which one is grammatically correct?
2
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2answers
74 views

Passivity as a passive activity?

I was reading "A fault in our stars" by John Green and he did something rather interesting. The scene is one in which the mother wants her child to attend support group. All the child wants to do is ...
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7answers
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… is done in agreement with xxx?

Background: I'm writing a professional (technical) report in which I want to express the following in one simple sentence: The whole report is written based on a certain assumption, except one part ...