Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

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1answer
36 views

for + period of time + present continuous/past perfect tense

What is the difference between (1) I've taken antibiotics for 10 weeks. (2) I've been taking antibiotics for 10 weeks. (3) I'm taking antibiotics for 10 weeks. (4) I take antibiotics for 10 weeks. ...
-1
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1answer
33 views

why do we use 'prepared' in a sentence like this [on hold]

The sentence below says something that's yet to happen, but the word prepared is in the past tense. Any suggestions on what to read to understand this will highly be appreciated. Thank you. Always ...
-1
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0answers
24 views

I don't feel on my biceps/particular muscle [on hold]

Is the usage correct? While doing a particular biceps exercise, I don't feel on my biceps.
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0answers
20 views

Can “The reasons could be many.” be a sentence on its own? [on hold]

Or should I rather say, "There could be many reasons."?
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0answers
20 views

Correct way to use capitalization for undergraduate degree [duplicate]

In writing about a persons college degree achievements I'm confused over capitalization. Any thoughts or inputs would be greatly appreciated. Here goes, should I write... He/She earned a Bachelor of ...
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0answers
53 views

Is “technical possible (to do something)” the same as “technically possible”? [on hold]

I've sometimes read the expression "technical possible" as a synonym of the phrase "technically possible". I would like to know if it is grammatically correct. If it's correct, I understand that ...
3
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2answers
66 views

Is “I like how when + phrase” correct?

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? I like how when Katy asked "Is everything okay?", Lilly asked "Is it not?".
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4answers
74 views

Is “cemetery gaits” grammatically correct?

There is a song with the following lyrics: "You know us by the way we crawl and you know us by our cemetery gaits" The part I'd like to ask about is 'cemetery gaits'. I love the lyric and am having ...
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0answers
18 views

Is “in” before “losing” correct in the following phrases? [migrated]

Sample #1: I am interested in doing the sport, and in losing weight. Sample #2: I am interested in doing the sport and in losing weight. (comma deleted before and) Question: Is placing in before ...
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1answer
30 views

Subject / verb agreement [closed]

None of the boys play / plays on the team. Each of us want/ wants to have a piece of the pie.
0
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1answer
26 views

Question regarding the usage of comma and preposition

Please someone help me to check these two sentences: A motivated hydrogeologist and keen on sustaining the environment and water resources, and on assessing the potential impacts of climate change ...
-3
votes
1answer
31 views

Tell versus Say [closed]

One of the differences between tell and say is that we cannot say somebody but we can tell somebody. What about the things? Can we use say for saying the things (everything), like this sentence? She ...
2
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2answers
65 views

Using partially redundant phrases such as “blatantly obvious” in a sentence for emphasis

Would it be grammatically correct to use phrases like blatantly obvious or hugely massive in a sentence? The words themselves have different enough meanings that I would think it is okay.
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0answers
36 views

Introduction to potential employer

Is this the proper way to introduce myself to a prospective employer? "My Great Uncle, Joe Smith, has spoken with you about my interest in entering the healthcare industry. I would like to set up a ...
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votes
1answer
32 views

Is this phrase grammatically correct? [closed]

Is the phrase below grammatically right ? " The most important reasons why I ... have to do with ... "
4
votes
2answers
72 views

What is the grammatical construction behind the word “climbing” in the phrase “climbing wall” or the word “running” in the phrase “running” shoes?

I am curious about the grammar behind the word "climbing" in the phrase "climbing wall" (or the word "running" in the phrase "running shoes," etc). I first thought it was an adjective describing the ...
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0answers
50 views

Is WHO an acronym or an initialism?

Is WHO (the World Health Organization) usually treated as an acronym without a definite article, or as an initialism with a definite article? I have seen both, but with the initialism usage ...
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0answers
23 views

Grammatical functions [closed]

Who have had similar experiences and dropped dead of unexplainable heart attack.... What grammatical name is given to this expression as it is used in the passage
3
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2answers
56 views

Is it valid to say 'in the presence of something' [closed]

The title I chose for my thesis is: Finding Synapses in Data in the Presence of Artifacts I think this is bad language and am unhappy with it but I am not a native speaker. I want to convey ...
1
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3answers
54 views

Definite article before “media”

Should this question use the definite article before "media"? Does the media influence us? Does media influence us? Are these both OK? I have seen both being used.
0
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1answer
41 views

use something to do something (with)

Surely it is not quite ethical but is it grammatical to say: "I am going to use this stick to hit you." vs "I am going to use this stick to hit you with." (excuse my ending the sentence with a ...
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0answers
66 views

Learning English Grammar [closed]

I have been learning English Grammar,but i failed to understand usage of these conjunctions. Which usage is correct, a or b ? Ps.This is not an homework sentence. A)Otherwise, society tends to fall ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Is that the correct use of past perfect? [on hold]

If he had done what he came here to do, he'd a come home. I wonder why Past Perfect is used in this statement?
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Why is “that” preceded by a comma in this relative clause? What does it mean?

As you know, there are two types of relative clause: Type 1 The woman who lives next door is a doctor. In this example,the relative clause tells us which person or thing (or what kind of ...
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2answers
47 views

What is the meaning of the phrase “Those who”?

There is a question asking a student to fill in the word. Heaven helps those ( ) help themselves. The answer is "who" Is this "who" is a relative pronoun? What is the meaning of this word?
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2answers
94 views

Is “I will sleep you to bed” grammatically correct? [closed]

Like we use "I will walk the dog to the park", is using "I will sleep you to bed" grammatically correct?
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0answers
33 views

I was asked if I …? [duplicate]

It seems to be a matter of opinion whether If I was a sailor, (seven oceans I'd sail to her) is correct or "were" must be used, but if you consider it to be wrong, would I was asked if I ...
0
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2answers
66 views

Should I use who or whom? [duplicate]

This is part of my sentence (for an essay): "For example, Kate- the Governor's sister, who/whom was later executed-...." Should I use who or whom in this situation?
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votes
3answers
50 views

“10 years in” vs. “In 10 years”

I read a headline: "10 years in, something happens". Is that grammatically correct or incorrect to give that headline? Any difference with "In 10 years, something happens"?
0
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2answers
69 views

Is writing “wishing you the best of health” at end of a letter considered a sentence fragment? [closed]

Is writing "wishing you the best of health" at end of a letter considered a sentence fragment?
0
votes
2answers
76 views

The more and the lesser [closed]

The more you learn, the lesser mistakes you make. Is this sentence grammatically correct? Can lesser be used to refer to the quality of the mistake?
3
votes
2answers
73 views

Is the “are” this sentence correct? [duplicate]

The following sentence sounds incorrect to me when read aloud. "Eating and playing like the locals are important for enjoying the festive atmosphere." I tried diagramming it and am clear on the ...
0
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0answers
37 views

Why is there no comma between this participle phrase and the main clause

I searched around, and they said that all the participle phrases are happening concurrently with the main clause. Hm, I thought they are consecutively happening, according to ...
0
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1answer
46 views

Can we have a noun after “being able to”?

Currently reading "Taiwan's brain drain prompts worries," by Austin Ramzy from International New York Times (January 14, 2016), I came across the following sentence: but I do not see the D.P.P. ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Is this the right usage of word 'sprain'?

There has come a sprain on my foot mysteriously through the night :), not able to walk comfortably. Also, is there any other general grammatical mistake in the above sentence?
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0answers
21 views

Can subjects really do more then in german [duplicate]

Two or three years ago my english teacher told me that "in the english language subjects can do more then in german". He gave an example like this: This car seats four persons Today my english ...
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0answers
27 views

Nostradamus in you

I am in the process of creating a prediction puzzle and need a tagline for it. I believe this one just might do the trick: Nostradamus in you! Is this correct English?
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0answers
20 views

Is the phrase “who/what even is [blank]” correct?

I've been hearing a lot of people recently say something like: What even is a baseball? however when I hear people say that I get the gut feeling that it should be What is a baseball even? ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Medium of instruction - “is in English” or “was in English”

I have requested for a certificate from my college and received the same. In that certificate I am seeing one grammatical error. But I just want to confirm. Here is the sentence in question: He ...
4
votes
3answers
277 views

Is it grammatically correct to shift an appositive away from the noun it renames or describes?

I'm taking a semester in London. Here's a sample of something I keep hearing: John: My mum will be here later? Susan: Is she staying for supper, your mum? If Susan wishes to say, "your ...
1
vote
2answers
92 views

Which one is correct - “ There is only us here” or “There are only us here” [duplicate]

Temporary reopen note: The linked-to question is about the verb agreeing with the grammatical number of the first item in a list in a there is/are sentence. However there is no list in this question ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

'I couldn't use to' instead of 'I didn't use to be able to/I used not to'

I heard this over the weekend - I've been going to evening classes and now, at last, I can touch type. I couldn't use to do that. I would normally say 'I didn't use to be able to do that', or ...
1
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2answers
42 views

'd hate to be vs. 'd hate being [closed]

Which of the following two structures is grammatically correct? Why? I'd hate to be questioned by the FBI. I'd hate being questioned by the FBI.
1
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3answers
63 views

Look and tell me what you see! Is it correct as a sentence? [closed]

Look and tell me what you see. Is it correct as a statement, or should I add quotation marks?
2
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0answers
35 views

Is it correct to add an adjective after a preposition? [migrated]

Here is a sentence from an English magazine: With the weather still on this side of chilly, it might be better to stay in and nest ― especially when nursing a cold. Why not write on this side of ...
11
votes
2answers
227 views

What exactly does it mean to say something is “grammatical?”

I often see the expression "That's ungrammatical" used to explain why something is not OK. For example, a user might post a question: "Is it OK to say, I are go to New York?" Most people would ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

How do I properly write a decesed female name that was married twice?

Lavalle E. Thielker was married to a Lester M. Arentz and he died and then she married a Thielker. Her maiden name is Lueck. Is this the correct way to show her whole name? Lavalle E. Arentz-Lueck ...
2
votes
1answer
76 views

Is subpoint an acceptable word? [closed]

MS Word likes to correct "subpoint" to "sub point" Is there anything grammatically wrong with "subpoint"?
1
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0answers
54 views

Is it right to say “What time is it?” and “What day is it?” when asking about the day and the time of an event? [migrated]

If there's an event yet to come and two people talking to each other about it, if one of them doesn't know about the day and the time, can he ask (What day is it?) and (What time is it?)? Isn't it ...
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2answers
22 views

Usage of “this issues with”

It has been customary to use the following sentence in official parlance, at the end of transfer orders. "This issues with the approval of the competent authority" Is this usage acceptable? This ...