Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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“Mistaken as” vs. “mistaken for”

I heard someone use the words mistaken as rather than mistaken for. Is this correct? If it is correct then what is the difference between the two? Is it ever wrong to use mistaken as, and if so, why? ...
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1answer
62 views

“Blue colour” or “Colour blue”

Recently I started learning english on busuu.com. In on of the elementary exercices "Colours", that I performed, the following phrase was stated as the correct answer: "I like the colour blue" ...
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2answers
61 views

Why do we say “write in” a journal instead of “write” journal?

I noticed that we always say "write in a journal" instead of simply "write a journal." Why is this?
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40 views

What would you say? [on hold]

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? 'I smelled that our dinner was burning.' I don't think I've heard that 'smell' as a verb is followed by that-clause. What do you think?
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2answers
72 views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
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3answers
105 views

Is “A Midsummer’s Night’s Dream” correct English?

Shakespeare’s play is called A Midsummer Night’s Dream. So is A Midsummer’s Night’s Dream correct English? If not, what would be the correct English?
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55 views

Does “clandestine ignorance” make sense? [on hold]

Does the following make sense, "clandestine ignorance"? I would like to see if anyone else is thinking the same way as to the meaning or definition as I do. Thanks.
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34 views

How can I write different in various ways? [on hold]

I like to know how to use different of something when I write. For instance, can I use a myriad of reasons, plethora of reasons, sundry of causes, multifarious reasons, various reasons like that? Is ...
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31 views

Difference between “cross” and “across” [on hold]

What is the difference between "I can cross the road" and "I can across the road"? Also, please explain why! Because I'm trying to improve my English usage of words in everyday English.
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19 views

meant and mean both words are same meaning? [migrated]

which would be the correct use of the word in the two sentences below: I mean, I can do it!!! or I can do, I meant it Also, please explain why! Because I'm trying to improve my English usage of ...
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67 views

Can we use both British English and American English in the same article?

Can we use British English trends and American English trends (such as spelling, or turns of phrase) in different sentences in the one topic?
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32 views

Use of the word “panic-stricken” for self

which would be the correct use of the word "panic-stricken" in the two sentences below: I was panic-stricken at the thought of missing my trip to usa OR I got panic-stricken at the thought ...
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29 views

Can one use 'prepare' instead of 'be prepared' or 'be ready'?

a) - The document you requested will take four days to be ready. b) - The document you requested will take four days to prepare. Does (b) give the same meaning as (a)? Is this a correct way to use ...
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52 views

Is it grammatical to say of some potential meaning that it is “able to be said” or “trying to be said”?

A recent commenter on a recent word-search question nominated a term as “an even better word for what is trying to be said.” This seems to me to attribute intention to something—a ...
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2answers
40 views

Is this sentence correct grammatically? [closed]

Do you have any knowledge at photography? Is this sentence correct? I don't think so, the at doesn't sound right, but my friend says some grammar checker tells that its correct?
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2answers
46 views

Claim a stake or stake a claim?

Which of the following is a correct usage? CLAIM A STAKE or STAKE A CLAIM I am highly confused about these two. How to use them in sentences? Though the first one appears to be correct to ...
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1answer
21 views

how to bind the clauses correctly? [closed]

How would the following sentence be correct? [...some statement here...] However there have been no further comments made in this research on whether it really is the case. I have the feeling that ...
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1answer
20 views

Is “Write something also on. . . .” ok?

In the following sentence, is the usage of also considered grammatically correct, or is there something wrong with it? Write something also on an alternative approach to this problem; explain ...
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1answer
67 views

Is “likes nothing less” or “likes nothing more” correct?

He likes nothing less than an extremely sophisticated life. He likes nothing more than an extremely sophisticated life. Both look meaningfully similar. In the first one, 'less' appears to ...
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19 views

What is the gramatically correct form? [duplicate]

What is the gramatically correct form: "my mom and dad's house" or "my mom's and dad's house"?
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38 views

“Charge it by the blink” vs. “charge it in blinks”

Which of these sentences is grammatically and semantically more appropriate? Lawyers measure time and charge it by the blink. Lawyers measure time and charge it in blinks.
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23 views

“Page Not Found” - is it grammatically correct? [duplicate]

404 - Page Not Found Every time I see this error message, I think: is it grammatically correct? Because I have the feeling that the verb is missing.
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1answer
94 views

Why is my English “worlds better” than yours but never “the best by worlds”?

In speech when making comparisons we can say: It is far better than It's way better than It's miles better than It's worlds better than For instance, British restaurant food is ...
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57 views

The delivery may be accelerated?

I'm writing a quotation and have to estimate a delivery date. My estimate is that we will make the delivery at January 1st. However, this will be impacted by when the project starts. It is in our ...
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2answers
167 views

The use of “So X as to Y”

First of all, note that this is not a duplicate question of another one asking about the usage of so as to, since this one is asking about the structure of so . . . as to. . . . I understand this ...
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236 views

Does “then before, now once more” mean anything?

Does the phrase then before, now once more have any meaning in English? Or does it exist just because it rhymes so nicely? Or does it exist at all? Likewise, what about that time then, once again?
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110 views

I can speak a little bit of German

I was asked to introduce myself and what languages I spoke. So I mentioned all the languages I know and in the end, I added "... and I can speak a little bit of German" After I said that, I was ...
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133 views

Is this correct usage of “it's”?

I saw this in an English text, and I was wondering if the "it's" here is used correctly: The morality of it’s debatable but you can ... I would be inclined to write it as: The morality of it ...
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1answer
84 views

Is this Adverbial a complement or an adjunct?

According to Wiki, Adverbials are typically divided into four classes: adverbial complements (i.e. obligatory adverbial) are adverbials that render a sentence ungrammatical and meaningless if ...
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1answer
23 views

“The horizontal and vertical transfers” vs. “the horizontal and the vertical transfers” [duplicate]

The Horizontal and vertical tranfers in Local Governement Is this fragment grammatically correct?
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65 views

Difference between “all the” and simply “all” [duplicate]

In a mail from my professor, I read you need to specify all the fields. Here, he gave us a form with about 25 fields. He asked us to fill out the fields. I'm skeptical about the usage of the ...
3
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1answer
63 views

Are both “from the offset” and “from the outset” correct?

I had always seen that phrase as "from the outset", but recently I saw somebody writing "from the offset" (meaning "from the beginning"). Dictionary.com claims that "offset" can be a synonym for ...
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152 views

Why can’t you say “I fell the stairs”?

The verb to fall strongly implies the direction down, but in some circumstances it is obligatory (in StdAmEng) to include the word “down.” The example I have in mind right now is I fall down the ...
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Is “was always with you” or “had always been with you” grammatically correct?

In those days wherever you went I had always been with you like a shadow. In those days wherever you went I was always with you like a shadow. Which one is grammatically correct?
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61 views

Passivity as a passive activity?

I was reading "A fault in our stars" by John Green and he did something rather interesting. The scene is one in which the mother wants her child to attend support group. All the child wants to do is ...
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7answers
3k views

… is done in agreement with xxx?

Background: I'm writing a professional (technical) report in which I want to express the following in one simple sentence: The whole report is written based on a certain assumption, except one part ...
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124 views

“I would like that he was normal”; is this sentence correct?

I would like that he was normal. This sounds a little awkward but plausible. Is it valid English? How about another example: I would like that he bathed before going to sleep. It sounds a ...
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1answer
51 views

I'll get lost tomorrow?

Is the following sentence correct? I'll get lost tomorrow. Mom asked if I have plans of exploring the city alone tomorrow. The city is really new to me and I don't mind if I lost myself ...
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1answer
57 views

Why isn't there a verb following can? [closed]

I have read a sentence in America Scientist (May 2014, p45): No longer can skeptical clinicians dismiss the approach as likely to be viable for only a few specific kinds of tumors... Why isn't ...
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69 views

Is it ok to say “mutually practice together”?

Is it correct to say This way we can mutually practice together. Since mutually has already been mentioned, is it correct if I use the word together at the end? It may be redundant, but is ...
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62 views

Which is the right word to ask if this will create problem on a proffesional tone

I'm drafting a mail to my team informing them that I'm taking leave on someday and that I want to know if this will create problem or friction in working. I used I’ll will be taking leave on June ...
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58 views

“Of which many” vs “many of which” as parenthetical modifiers

The houses on Canal street, of which many had been damaged in the storm, looked abandoned. Is the modifier "of which many... storm" correct? I know that "on canal street" is a prepositional ...
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1answer
39 views

Am I using the semicolon correctly in this example? [closed]

When school is over and got nothing to do; wouldn't it be better if you could do something with your friends or family?
3
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1answer
108 views

“Four years are” vs. “four years is” [duplicate]

An exam question is driving me crazy. Find the mistake in the following: Four years are a long time to spend away from family and friends. Literally everyone solved it by replacing are with ...
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3answers
65 views

Should we repeat the verb after “rather than”?

Super AMOLED Plus uses a traditional RGB RGB (3 subpixels) arrangement typically used in LCD displays rather than the PenTile RGBG pixel matrix (2 subpixels) used in Super AMOLED. or Super ...
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90 views

“I had my house [be] burned down”

I have found out that using the verb be in passive constructions such as: I had my house be burned down is incorrect, therefore it should be I had my house burned down. But is it ...
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2answers
90 views

Can Neither-Or be used?

My friend was reading the book "The Fault in Our Stars" by John Green and she found what seems to be a grammar mistake. The following sentence is found in the author's note: Neither novels or ...
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2answers
82 views

English Article [duplicate]

I have come across a sentence where 'Niagara Falls' is used without an article. I seem to remember that there is a basic rule of the English language that there should be an article before any ...
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42 views

looking for appositive that-which phrases

I asked sentences having an appositive that-which phrase like the following sentence in English Language Learners. The insect propagates best near "disturbed land," that which is being cultivated ...
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1answer
73 views

Usage of “What does who want?”

I have stumbled upon the phrase "What does who want?" which puzzles me. Its unusualness makes me doubt. I have been told it is used just as "What does he want?", with [who] replacing [he] when we ...