Questions about the structure of grammar

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8
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4answers
656 views

Conflicting Advice: “Not Only,” “But Also” Constructions — Comma, No Comma, Parallel Structure?

I've searched for the answer on this site and other websites, and found conflicting advice and sample sentences that look wrong to me. I'm posting this question hoping for clarification. My ...
-2
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2answers
3k views

Can the preposition 'in' be used before the noun 'abroad'?

Can the preposition in be used before the noun abroad? Can I write the following sentence: Your friend in abroad?
1
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1answer
84 views

Subject + having (grammar)

I have found the sentence which uses a structure following below: S + having + O The sentence is like this : A name having some properties In here, I am confuse, does the sentence refer to simple or ...
1
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1answer
123 views

What vs Where …is the common ground/basis

According to Merriam-Webster the common ground is a basis of mutual interest or agreement and the basis is the principal component of something Both are often used in the context of ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

Which one is correct: “to have verbed” or “verbing”?

I have two confusing sentences and I am in two minds whether the first or the second is more grammatically correct: He was by far the most knowledgeable person to have commented on the subject, so ...
1
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1answer
2k views

Would it be 'meet' or 'have met' in this structure?

If I bumped into someone, who happened to be called John, yesterday, and I am telling someone else of the encounter, would I say: I happened to meet John yesterday. or I happened to have ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the correct grammatical formation of this paragraph?

I have seen this particular meme trending on a lot of social media platforms of late. I'm wondering what the grammatically correct formation of the meme (phrase) is? The meme in questions reads as ...
-2
votes
1answer
117 views

Term for when you're attributing something to a rule

I'm looking for a word or a phase that describes attributing something not to a person or group, but to an inanimate object like a rule. Ex. A best practice is to run cross browser tests in all ...
1
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0answers
196 views

In word construction, is there a affix order?

Does english have classes of prefixes and suffixes like it does adjectives, and if so, how are they usually ordered? For example, adjectives usually go in this order (or something like it): ...
1
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0answers
66 views

The “to be” part in a “It seems ____” phrase

Is it acceptable to drop that 'to be' or 'to have been' parts when using the verb 'seem' before a noun/noun phrase? The author — as it seems his custom — does not specify the age of his ...
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0answers
27 views

How can I use phrase “Running Amok” , can I use “My running amok”?

I want to use "running amok" like "my running amok". Is that right or not? I want to use this phrase literary. Like "my running amok" or "my amok run" or "my run amok" etc. Please correct me.
0
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0answers
37 views

How to overcome confusion of contrasting word 2?

Actual sentence: Another surprising finding was the lack of any neurotic traits in the bonobos, even though these are widely found in other ape species. In this sentence, two contrasting ...
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0answers
21 views

Definite or indefinite article in this case?

I have developed my cultural awareness within [the/a] commercial context. In this case, I want to say that I have cultural awareness in the context of commerce. I think it should be the definite ...
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0answers
41 views

“You need [v.] no longer”

I was playing GTA IV earlier today and I called Roman (who is the protagonist's cousin) for a cab. English is Roman's second language and he said to Niko (the protagonist) something along the lines of:...
0
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0answers
42 views

As cold as it was today vs as cold as it is today

I'd like to know whether all of the following sentences have the same meaning. Are all of these sentences grammatically correct? 1) Tomorrow will be twice as cold 2) Tomorrow will be twice as cold as ...
0
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0answers
52 views

“Due to” as a preposition?

In this answer (http://english.stackexchange.com/a/117979/129806) Trevor D states that in this sentence, "A special train service was cancelled due to operating difficulties." "due to" is a ...
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0answers
69 views

Sentence doesn't “feel” right, but is it really incorrect?

A friend of mine wrote this sentence: 'The material consists of crumbly blocks, but they are still sturdy enough to not fall apart during bumpy transport.' To me this grates a bit. Even though the ...
0
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0answers
92 views

How does one correctly use the 'verb + infinitive' construction?

Which option is correct? I want add something. I want to add something. If there is a general rule, please describe it. If you know how to better name the topic, propose your own version.
0
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0answers
90 views

A “model plane” or a “plane model”: What's the difference?

Which question is correct? If they are both correct, what's the difference between these questions? How do you make a model plane? How do you make a plane model?
0
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0answers
227 views

How to properly structure a sentence: <something right now> before and because of <something that happens soon in the future>

What is the correct form of the following sentence? "There are no more options available before the order is cancelled tomorrow" or, "There are no more options available before the order will be ...