Questions about the structure of grammar

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6
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2answers
129 views

Is Grammar An Exact Science? [closed]

"Science" might not be the appropriate word but I think it conveys the gist of my question: Is grammar always an agreed-upon, exact process among professionals when identifying usage and parts ...
1
vote
2answers
50 views

Difference between “doesn't seem to rain” & “doesn't seem to be raining” [closed]

What's the difference between 'It doesn't seem to rain.' and 'It doesn't seem to be raining.' ? Is it that the first means "the rain didn't occur often", and the second means "it doesn't rain in the ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Which one is correct: “to have verbed” or “verbing”?

I have two confusing sentences and I am in two minds whether the first or the second is more grammatically correct: He was by far the most knowledgeable person to have commented on the subject, so ...
1
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1answer
112 views

What is it called when reversing a phrase doesn't mean the same as the original phrase?

What is the rhetorical device/argument called when one says: All surgeons are doctors, but not all doctors are surgeons.
0
votes
1answer
93 views

Can a sentence be “causative”, if the subject is only implied?

Original text Please _________ by your next of kin. a. section 9 have completed b. have completed section 9 c. have section 9 completed The correct answer is c But for the life of me, I ...
-1
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0answers
21 views
1
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1answer
41 views

Grammatical name/function of “what” in the following sentence

I came across this sentence fragment among the instructions for a writing lab report: "Simply describe what the data that you collected." I feel like it should have an "are" at the end (minimally ...
-1
votes
0answers
26 views

Best word usage [closed]

What's the best word usage for this title: Mindfullness/Concentration - A Lost Art or Mindfullness & Concentration: A Lost Art or????
0
votes
1answer
89 views

Is this proper use of present tense?

I understand it's possible to use narrating in present tense in some texts, particularly in essays. In this picture, though, what seems odd to me is sentences like "Albert and Bernard just become ...
3
votes
2answers
63 views

Is “switched” always used as a verb?

I was thinking that the word switched could be used as a noun and maybe an adjective too but I might just be making grammar mistakes. Switched in the dictionary only shows up as being a verb! Here ...
1
vote
1answer
118 views

Non-standard sentence construction with “there is no”

I have just come across this very unusual construction, in my view at least. Is it correct and if yes, what grammar rules apply here? I would really appreciate it if anyone could help me with this and ...
1
vote
2answers
54 views

A relative pronoun followed by a transitive verb like “find”

The verb find + it is still valid in this type of sentence? "I've used this type of syllabus which I don't find it suitable" Should i omit the "it" in the sentence?
0
votes
2answers
35 views

understand and comprehend usage

This post is make of a few related questions. Q1. Which structure is more preferred? This method is hard to understand for students. This method is hard to be understood by students. Q2. Which ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

'he prepared the design' or 'he designed'?

Here are my constructions: While carrying out his engineering project, he prepared the design of wired and wireless network infrastructure and developed the new architectural plans of the ...
-1
votes
1answer
95 views

Need help constructing consistent sentences, and naming parts

I'm a software developer and I'm trying to write a consistent "grammar" for an audit log feature. An Audit log is basically a list of actions that happened in the past. As it's a part of the ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

'develop' or 'developing' [closed]

Here are my constructions: He has the ability to develop policies, procedures and solutions that improve network disaster recovery and business continuity. He has the ability to developing ...
-4
votes
1answer
48 views

Interrogative implicit within a sentence

What is the grammatical term for sentences like: Do you know where he lives?" I can’t imagine how he did it." In those sentences we use what is essentially an interrogative sentence (bolded), but ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

A “model plane” or a “plane model”: What's the difference?

Which question is correct? If they are both correct, what's the difference between these questions? How do you make a model plane? How do you make a plane model?
1
vote
4answers
161 views

“to” + infinitive vs. just infinitive vs. gerund after the phrase “verb for”

The Spanish verb contar translates to "to count". Which of the following would be a better way to express this in formal writing: Contar is the Spanish verb for count. Contar is the Spanish ...
4
votes
2answers
150 views

SAT grammar question: Why is this “them” incorrect?

SAT grammar question: There are (more than) 300 million English speakers (in) India, most of (them) acquired English (as) a second language. (No error) The parentheses designate areas where the ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

semantic difference for the forms: “x of y” vs. “x of the y” vs. “y x”

As a non-native speaker, I have a problem understanding the difference in meaning of the following forms: "… of …" "… of the …" "… …" To be more specific, let me give some instances: "theory of ...
8
votes
7answers
8k views

Difference between “without” and “with no”

What is the difference between the usage of without and with no? For example, without sound and with no sound.
0
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0answers
47 views

Would it be 'meet' or 'have met' in this structure?

If I bumped into someone, who happened to be called John, yesterday, and I am telling someone else of the encounter, would I say: I happened to meet John yesterday. or I happened to have ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

Does tense change when the narrator (present) writes about what a person (past) could have said about their time?

Does tense change when the narrator (present) writes about what a person (past) could have said about their time? For example A person who lived during 1790 could truthfully claim that Washington ...
0
votes
2answers
87 views
1
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1answer
171 views

present simple plus past simple in the if-clause

Please help me understand whether I can use the past simple tense with the present simple tense in one if-clause. My example is the question that I want to ask when speaking with English native ...
-2
votes
3answers
11k views

Why is “I’m doing great” correct?

"I'm doing great" appears to be incorrect (to me) because 'great' can be used as an adjective. I would think that it should be: "I'm doing (adverb)." Why is it actually correct to say "I'm doing ...
5
votes
1answer
129 views

Why don't interrogative sentences _start_ with a question mark? [closed]

Not all questions start with Wh- words, so why don't we start a question with a question mark to make it more obvious that it is actually a question? For instance, when I'm reading a book which has a ...
2
votes
3answers
974 views

Suggestion phrased as a question

I recently received a mark-down for the following phrase: With this regard, will you please accept the Takeover agreement on this quote so that we can proceed with the validation process? The ...
4
votes
5answers
196 views

the verb 'declare' without a person who declares

Someone declares that the changes are aimed at combating untimeliness and incompleteness in [name of tax] tax assessment and withholding by tax agents. How would you express the said idea without ...
4
votes
3answers
13k views

Is it two-third or two-thirds?

Is it two-third or two-thirds? If both are correct, how does their usage differ?
4
votes
4answers
1k views

When to use this construction: so Adjective a Noun

In "The Quiet American" by Graham Greene, Mr Fowler says: I watched her closely while she asked how I was and touched my splinted leg and gave me her shoulder to lean on, as though one could lean ...
-1
votes
1answer
34 views

My thesis statement sounds awkward, should I add more commas? [closed]

Thesis statement: " Between both republics, the second republic is more advantageous for interest groups than the first republic because of the continuous increase size of government."
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Parse a sentence (from Ratcliff 1990 paper)

A little background: this paper concerns forgetting in neural networks (a computer science concept). The word "activation" might mean the activation (=output) of neuron(s), but since I cannot parse ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

using word “Responsive” correctly? [closed]

I wrote this sentence for my report, but I am not fully comfortable in using "responsive". Can any one check and point out the mistakes? Various constraints relating RGB cameras were found to be ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

How is this sentence to be interpreted?

One thing that bothers me - a lot - reading older English texts, is the apparent tendency of writers to write what appear to me to be sentence fragments. For instance, today I found this old "map": ...
4
votes
7answers
1k views

What is the difference between a part of speech and a syntactic function / grammatical relation?

What is the difference between a part-of-speech and a function? In other words: What is a part of speech. (e.g. noun) What is a grammatical function. (e.g. head, subject) [read "grammatical ...
1
vote
3answers
117 views

A blinding light / blinding sunlight / a blinding sunlight

"Mornings came and cast a blinding sunlight over everything, and he felt like nothing worthwhile could be accomplished." For some reason, I feel like "a blinding light" is ok, but if its sunlight, ...
5
votes
2answers
5k views

Noun + participle as adjective phrase

There's a construction in English that allows us to form a compound adjective from a noun and a past participle. Examples: This is a volunteer-built home. Our newspaper is student-run. ...
2
votes
2answers
94 views

'… this good of a wave…'?

I've just been listening to Jeff Clark, the first to surf Mavericks. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-31093276 Around 2:20 he relates a story with Mark Foo, a Hawaiian surfer: The big wave ...
0
votes
0answers
104 views

How to properly structure a sentence: <something right now> before and because of <something that happens soon in the future>

What is the correct form of the following sentence? "There are no more options available before the order is cancelled tomorrow" or, "There are no more options available before the order will be ...
1
vote
4answers
6k views

Should there be a comma after 'and'?

This is a bit of a strange question because I know that there should never ever be a comma after 'and.' But what if there's a parenthetical statement/clause-thing right after it? Let me demonstrate. ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Is 'this this' correct?

The ability to echo words and still make a meaningful statement has always bugged me. Take this example sentence: "Thank you for bringing this issue to my attention. We will take care of this this ...
1
vote
2answers
43 views

Chronological order when using “and”?

In a sentence like "At the party, I ate and drank" where the actions are done concurrently, does the order of the verbs show anything about chronological order? For example, in "At the party, I ate ...
-1
votes
1answer
44 views
6
votes
8answers
5k views

Em dash vs semicolon: which is more appropriate in the following examples?

I am very confused by these, and even when I understand other people's usage of them I find it difficult to know when to employ them myself. For this reason, I am trying to make my own examples and ...
0
votes
3answers
15k views

“could have” vs. “could have been”

Can somebody explain when to use could have and could have been and under what circumstances? Please explain with an example. Is it something to do with the active (could have) and the passive ...
-3
votes
2answers
111 views

Can anyone analyze the sentence structure for me?

I just watched a movie and saw a sentence in it. I can understand it but it is different from any sentence building rule my teacher has ever taught me: Me staring in your dead eye with my hand ...
1
vote
2answers
160 views

“was” or “were” – “one of the messages which was/were” [closed]

My question is should I use was or were in the following sentence: ...this is one of the messages, which was/were sent in the space 37 years ago. Which one I should use?
0
votes
1answer
170 views

Leak vs Leakage?

English is not my first language and I'm having trouble using the words "leak" and "leakage". Do they both mean the same thing? or what is the correct grammatical usage of each word? Thank you very ...