Questions about the structure of grammar

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Inspiring from sth [migrated]

In my paper, I want to say a sentence like this: Inspiring from human societies, we want to do sth. As I searched it seems that "inspiring from" is not correct. What should I use instead of that? ...
2
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2answers
31 views

Usage of the word 'have'

Are the following sentences grammatically correct? I will soon have a new secretary work for me on the weekends. I will soon have a new secretary working for me on the weekends. I will soon have a ...
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0answers
18 views

Usage of the word 'like' [on hold]

Is the follwing sentence grammatically correct? I do not like Tom drink alcohol everyday.
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1answer
173 views

Would it be 'meet' or 'have met' in this structure?

If I bumped into someone, who happened to be called John, yesterday, and I am telling someone else of the encounter, would I say: I happened to meet John yesterday. or I happened to have ...
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1answer
17 views

Identifying the sentence structure. Is this sentence a compound sentence?

I am trying to determine the sentence structure of the sentence: Along with every other devoted Aussie trackydack dagger, I beg the federal government to ban these abhorrent, foreign "cuffs" and ...
2
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1answer
37 views

“It claims to be” vs “it claims is”

A. The company has unveiled what it claims is the world's smallest camera. B. The company has unveiled what it claims to be the world's smallest camera. Could someone please explain why ...
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1answer
41 views

Is a preposition of place required when replacing “where” with “that”?

A preposition appears to be needed when that is used in sentences such as: That's the store where I bought my computer. That's the store that I bought my computer (at?). with exceptions ...
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1answer
86 views

semantic difference for the forms: “x of y” vs. “x of the y” vs. “y x”

As a non-native speaker, I have a problem understanding the difference in meaning of the following forms: "… of …" "… of the …" "… …" To be more specific, let me give some instances: "theory of ...
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2answers
69 views

In place names, do the words qualifying the place act as an adjective?

If you have a place name such as “The Sierra Nevada Mountains”, does Sierra Nevada act as an adjective? My guess is yes, since they qualify the noun mountains, e.g.: “Which mountains? The Sierra ...
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2answers
108 views

Unclear grammar of present continuous — is it present continuous?

A clerk taking cash from a customer and not entering it in the cash register. Here's my question: how and when can I use subject + verb + ing without be like the first part in the sentence? For ...
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1answer
25 views

Using “and” to begin a sentence [duplicate]

Is it grammatically correct to use the word "and" as the first word in a sentence? Why or why not?
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2answers
151 views

Grammatical name/function of “what” in the following sentence

I came across this sentence fragment among the instructions for a writing lab report: "Simply describe what the data that you collected." I feel like it should have an "are" at the end (minimally ...
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3answers
488 views

When should I use “to do” and “to doing”

folks Here are two sentences that I find difficult to understand the grammar during my reading. Last year, two of her ministers suggested that convicted tycoons be pardoned if they could contribute ...
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5answers
67 views

Is this correct? [duplicate]

I don't buy no drinks. I saw this phrase in a song, and I'm not quite sure if it's correct I hope you'll help me find the answer. Thank you in advance.
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1answer
120 views

Is this proper use of present tense?

I understand it's possible to use narrating in present tense in some texts, particularly in essays. In this picture, though, what seems odd to me is sentences like "Albert and Bernard just become ...
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1answer
24 views

interesting for you to say that

Just heard a non-native English speaker saying this: "Interesting for you to say that, since..." I would have said "Interesting that you should say that" Are both correct and natural? And what ...
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2answers
223 views

Non-standard sentence construction with “there is no”

I have just come across this very unusual construction, in my view at least. Is it correct and if yes, what grammar rules apply here? I would really appreciate it if anyone could help me with this and ...
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1answer
137 views

What is the correct grammatical formation of this paragraph?

I have seen this particular meme trending on a lot of social media platforms of late. I'm wondering what the grammatically correct formation of the meme (phrase) is? The meme in questions reads as ...
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1answer
50 views

Starting a text using By + ing form

Can I start a text using by + ing form? Ex. By recognizing the difficulty of the material, the teacher took extra time teaching it to her students.
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1answer
35 views

What does “nothing that” mean? [closed]

I read this article- Greeks take to the streets for dueling rallies that reflect a divided nation in Washington post. And I'm confused about what the "nothing that" means in this part : The ...
2
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1answer
86 views

'Nonprobabilistic Sampling' versus 'Nonprobability Sampling'

I'm writing a research paper, and I need to translate it to English. I hired a translator and I'm not sure that the following sentence has the right structure: Interventions: It was performed ...
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1answer
61 views

Be it… or grammar

Can anyone please describe the use of "be it or " grammar, I have checked internet but couldn't find anything that me help. with regards
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3answers
9k views

Meaning and usage of “be of”

I see such sentences all the time and I'd like to learn more about their grammatical structure (e.g. how they are described in grammatical terms), their meaning and how to use them in different ...
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1answer
31 views

Cannot understand sentence in preface to “Old Indian Legends” by Zitkala-Ša

I'm reading the preface to Old Indian Legends by Zitkala-Ša, originally published in 1901. My mother tongue is not English, and I am having some trouble understanding - in detail - what she actually ...
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1answer
2k views

Is it necessary to use “the” before using verb+“ing” in specific contexts?

I am confused with whether it is necessary to use the before verbs in certain contexts. Like: The milking of a cow is not a painful process at all like you think. I am afraid it has never been ...
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1answer
56 views

Special modals (modal + has/have + V3) [closed]

Can anyone clear my doubt about these special modals : She could have asked me for the dinner. She must not have done it. He should have taken her to his home. I would have kissed her if ...
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1answer
45 views

Correct usage of expression “or did I” [closed]

In the opening sentence of an article I am writing, I state something that would seem obvious to the reader, but that I will challenge (since I will be closing with a slightly different conclusion). ...
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4answers
2k views

Meaning of the full title of Darwin's “On the origin of species”

The full title of Darwin's work "On the origin of species" is: "On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life". My ...
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4answers
22k views

“could have” vs. “could have been”

Can somebody explain when to use could have and could have been and under what circumstances? Please explain with an example. Is it something to do with the active (could have) and the passive ...
2
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2answers
553 views

Is this proper English: “I am student”? [closed]

So, I have a debate with my associate. We are debating whether one can say something like "I am student." It was argued that this was proper and that indeed you can use a verb followed by a noun ...
4
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1answer
52 views

Is “rub on” a phrasal verb or not?

I think the following sentences are all grammatical. So I am wondering whether there is a phrasal verb "rub on" that has the same meaning as "rub"-as-a-transitive-verb. If there is no phrasal verb, ...
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0answers
23 views

How does one correctly use the 'verb + infinitive' construction?

Which option is correct? I want add something. I want to add something. If there is a general rule, please describe it. If you know how to better name the topic, propose your own version.
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2answers
100 views

Why does moving the adverb to the front remove ambiguity?

Take the sentence Students who study physics rigorously learn math. As it stands, 'rigorously' can modify either 'study' or 'learn'. But if we move the adverb to the front to get Rigorously, ...
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7answers
10k views

Difference between “without” and “with no”

What is the difference between the usage of without and with no? For example, without sound and with no sound.
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90 views

Names for different forms of “command” sentences and their parts [closed]

Edit: I'm rewording the question, so as to maybe make it more answerable. My goal: I'd like to create a parser that allows my program to accept certain types of english sentences. In particular, I ...
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2answers
123 views

Is the sentence; 'Can people stop inviting me to play games I don't want to.' grammatically correct? [closed]

Is the sentence 'Can people stop inviting me to play games I don't want to.' grammatically correct? To me it doesn't sound right. Is the sentence; 'Can people stop inviting me to play games that I ...
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5answers
9k views

Should there be a comma after 'and'?

This is a bit of a strange question because I know that there should never ever be a comma after 'and.' But what if there's a parenthetical statement/clause-thing right after it? Let me demonstrate. ...
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1answer
62 views

Is that correct to say? [closed]

Speaking about bedtime reading... Please, help me with my grammar "As a rule, I don't take handsome dead conductors to bed, but if it is Bernstein, my husband doesn't mind".
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5answers
7k views

Is “criterions” a valid plural for “criterion”?

Is criterions a valid plural for criterion? Dictionary.com says it is, but Oxford does not confirm or reject it.
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1answer
103 views

What is difference between GOT TO and HAVE TO [closed]

I was searching today on this topic. i found some posts on web according to them 1) I got to go now. 2) I have to go now. these two sentences are same but i wanna confirm that are they ...
4
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3answers
7k views

Is it grammatical to finish a sentence with “also”?

In the following text, I wonder if it's grammatical to finish the sentence with also. it does sound weird to me. The sentence sound incomplete somehow and makes the audience wait for more. Here ...
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1answer
85 views

Can a prepositional phrase starting with “during” work as an adjectival phrase?

A prepositional phrase comprising a preposition and a noun phrase can generally function either as an adjectival phrase or as an adverbial phrase. The book on the table is mine. (The ...
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2answers
123 views

Is it ever grammatical to leave out the verb 'to be' between subject and predicate?

In the following sentence there is no verb to be after the subject and before the predicate: Indeed this government - neither their great wealth nor their many supporters will benefit them on ...
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2answers
93 views

Understanding “Couldn't have got”

Here are two sentences: Sarah hasn't contacted me. She couldn't have got my message. What is the correct meaning of the above? Since Sarah hasn't contacted me, there's a possibility she ...
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6answers
526 views

I have no money to buy a bed [with]

BACKGROUND In this question, it was asked why it sounds better to omit 'with' in I have no money to buy a bed (with). whereas 'with' sounds right in I have no ball to play soccer with. ...
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1answer
42 views

Is the use of “Them” right here? [duplicate]

On StackOverFlow, the users who do not put anything in the profile have this displayed. "Apparently, this user prefers to keep an air of mystery about them.". Should it not be him/her? Clarifying ...
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3answers
147 views
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0answers
13 views

What's correction: for the both of us or for both of us [duplicate]

I look forward to us communicating further, which may lead to great business opportunities for the both of us.
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2answers
55 views

Should I be putting the quote symbol every time someone is saying something? [closed]

Serina saw a reflection of light, now with Aron behind her she searched where she had seen the glistening. “What is it?” he asked “I don’t know it’s almost… All the sudden she stopped and screamed ...
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2answers
177 views

Is Grammar An Exact Science? [closed]

"Science" might not be the appropriate word but I think it conveys the gist of my question: Is grammar always an agreed-upon, exact process among professionals when identifying usage and parts ...