0
votes
2answers
416 views

“everybody sing” vs “everybody sings”

I have been told 'everybody' is singular. However, there was a film named "Everybody Sing". What are the differences between "everybody sing" and "everybody sings"? Which is correct? the former, the ...
6
votes
2answers
12k views

Are “skill set” and “skill sets” both acceptable?

Are the phrases skill set and skill sets both correct? As I see it, set implies a single set of related skills whereas sets can be taken to mean multiple sets of skills around different ...
2
votes
1answer
124 views

“Some is controversial, and some is my opinions” — is this grammatical?

I came across the expression ... some is controversial, and some is my opinions. Is this correct? I wonder if “... some are my opinions” might be more correct.
2
votes
2answers
193 views

Why the discrepancy between number and case in (some) British English?

By chance, I've heard a lot of Midlands English in the last few weeks, and have noticed this sort of disconnect: "It cost me five pound" (rather than 'pounds'); "The ball rolled ten foot" (rather than ...
1
vote
1answer
94 views

Express a phrase as compound [closed]

I need to express this phrase as a short compound to be used as programming variable name (this phrase is in the context of a software user interface): the block showing current chatters I have ...
0
votes
2answers
317 views

If a high attrition rate is observed in a workforce, how do you state it as a characteristic of a generalized individual? Highly Mobile?

Here's the context: Statement: Attrition among the X workforce is high. Now I want to specify this at an individual's context. As in: "The X worker is __" What is the correct term here? The X worker ...
3
votes
6answers
4k views

In special cases, can you use “one such family are” vs. “one such family is”?

Is it correct to say "one such family are..." as opposed to "one such family is..." in some circumstances? Say, for instance, as used in this article on gene families: [...] One such family are ...
0
votes
3answers
6k views

Plural of “A good night's sleep”

Is it possible to have a plural of "A good night's sleep"? Would "Some good nights' sleep" be correct? Edit: I'm thinking specifically in the sentence: "I'm looking forward to a good night's sleep" ...