This tag is about how the grammar works: different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean.

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4
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1answer
193 views

Can 'holidays' take a singular verb form?

In the thread accompanying the question The holidays are a good time to be with family, Colin Fine writes The holidays is a good time..., which I don't think is idiomatic even in the US I'd ...
2
votes
1answer
615 views

Comma before “than” [What better way to celebrate.., than…]

I'd really appreciate some help on this one. Do I use comma in the following sentence? What better way to celebrate 30 years of [name of my local football club], than with a win against [name of ...
2
votes
1answer
424 views

Can an -ing or -ed clause be seen as a relative clause?

I'm confused with reducing clauses. I need help to understand reducing clauses in English. For example: The amount of goods transported by train totaled about 70 tonnes. I think the full ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Is the phrase “has got” grammatically correct?

Does "Mary's Got Talent" mean "Mary Has Got Talent"? Is "has got" grammatically correct in this instance?
1
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1answer
65 views

Do you use the plural or singular when asking for a comparison?

On a web page form the following question is asked: "Are your business and home address the same?*" Is this correct? I am often wrong about stuff like this but shouldn't it be: "Are your business ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

When can we omit the subject of a clause?

Is the following sentence correct? Rob is not at school today, but said he would come tomorrow. Notice that the version above does not have a subject before said. Should it be: Rob is not at ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

comparative clause

The following three sentences appear in the same published paper. Why does No. 1 employ the auxiliary "did" whereas the other two omit it? This could explain why ProRoot WMTA showed significantly ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

A song came on tv

I'm not a native English speaker, so I wanted to ask something. How would you say that 'As i was zapping through the channels, and this song came on'. Is this a correct sentence? Basically what I ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

Alternative for Under the Guidance of

I am writing a statement of purpose and want an alternative for "under the guidance of Professor". I has been used many times in the SOP and I want to avoid using it as much as possible. One ...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

“if and as” - Does it mean what I think it means and is it even grammatically sound?

Very infrequently, I'll use the fragment "if and as" in a sentence. For instance: Having it be double fudge chocolate cake in both cases comes off as needless frippery if and as the recipe is ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

Is “offer something someone” without “to” in between correct?

I interpret the latter part of the following sentence to mean "and are quite unprepared to offer the priority seats to those whom the seats are meant for." If this is correct, "to" seems to be missing ...
1
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1answer
57 views

“To show for” correct usage

Came across this sentence in a newspaper article. "But as the months passed by quickly with little other than grand announcements and declarations to show for, the case for more hands at the wheel ...
1
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1answer
80 views

Which phrase is correct?

In following sentence: "...involves the natural conflict between citizens’ expectations and government policy for data protection and preserving privacy vis-à-vis the need to share information across ...
1
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0answers
140 views

present simple plus past simple in the if-clause

Please help me understand whether I can use the past simple tense with the present simple tense in one if-clause. My example is the question that I want to ask when speaking with English native ...
1
vote
0answers
293 views

Subject/Complement Agreement. How to describe problem with “The thing is the objects.”

In my ell answer, version 32, I provided the following, problematic, wording (especially bold italic), and I need help to better understand this issue so I can fix my answer:1 The thing is ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Is the 'unmarked'/standard/basic form called the oblique/objective case?

[Source:] This happens because what linguists would call the “unmarked” or standard, basic form for pronouns turns out to be the objective form—me, him, her, them, and the like. This is the form ...
0
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0answers
34 views

What governed present subjunctive uses in archaic English?

Source, para 4 : p 2 of 2, 'Against YA', by Ruth Graham, slate.com Fellow grown-ups, at the risk of sounding snobbish and joyless and old, we are better than this. I know, I know: Live and let ...
0
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0answers
58 views

“In here”, “from here”, and“at here”

I just read the discussed topic "look here vs. look at here". Which one is correct? "Look here" or "Look at here"? I was wondering what the reason is for not using the preposition ...
0
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0answers
37 views

is there a syntactic error in this sentence?

The receptionist’s firm voice was backed by the guild’s evaluation system and by extension the combined effort of many adventurers. I somewhat believe this sentence is right grammatically if ...
0
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0answers
42 views

“I might as well have imagined” vs “I might as well have been remembering”

Which one is the correct form, or at least the most commonly used? Example: 1207 B.C. Wow, I found it impossible to imagine a time as far in the past as that. I might as well have imagined ...
0
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0answers
29 views

Which personal pronouns take dependent clause and which personal pronouns don't take

Note from The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language - (Page no. 507) i. It is I [who am at fault]. ii. It is me [who is at fault]. Example [i] follows the general rules for ...
0
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0answers
31 views

Introductory books for language theory

I have computer science background and I am looking for some NLP algorithms for stemming, POS tagging etc. The language under consideration is "agglutinative and inflectional". Since from CS ...
0
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0answers
96 views

From one to another or From one to the other?

Is there a difference if I say "the recipe varies from one cook to the other" or "the recipe varies from one cook to another"?
0
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0answers
32 views

“Grown substantially” or “substantially grown”?

a non-native speaker with a simple question here. I want to say that a research field has become much bigger in recent years. Is it correct to write Since _____, the field of ______ has grown ...
0
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0answers
64 views

You drove faster than was allowed, so you got a speeding ticket

You drove faster than was allowed, so you got a speeding ticket. I think that the above sentence is grammaticaly correct. Why is not possible to write: You drove faster than it was allowed, so you ...
0
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0answers
23 views

Is a value something to “indicate” the valued thing?

Sorry for the confusing title. I came across the below sentence, and am wondering if the word "indicate" collocates with the word "value" as in this case: The PCS (Print Contrast Signal) is a ...
0
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0answers
283 views

Far more … than meaning

Theft of an idea is far more difficult for proving in court than word-for-word plagiarism. Can far more be used in that sentence? What does it mean?
0
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0answers
51 views

Grammar rules for comparisons with similar structures

The original quote I would rather suffer the pain of discipline than suffer the pain of regret Variations: I would rather suffer the pain of discipline than the pain of regret I would ...
0
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0answers
40 views

OF as a part of speech

What part of speech is the word "of" in the phrase "made of"? Trying to review the word "of" I the command :"Go and make disciples of all nations". Please help
0
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0answers
173 views

Is the term, gone from blank to blank, academically acceptable?

Is the term, gone from (blank) to (blank), academically acceptable? If not what alternatives are there to state the same thing in a more precise manner?
0
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0answers
24 views

Do I say “tabloid and live television, and professional wrestling” or “tabloid television, live television, and professional wrestling”?

This is the sentence I wish to check: "Author Chris Hedges writes about how entertainment industries, like tabloid television, live television, and professional wrestling, showcase crude examples of ...
0
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0answers
46 views

Is my usage of “can apply” correct in the given example?

The concept of different techniques yielding different (though correct) results can apply to the measurement of physical properties such as A, B, C, and D. Is the usage of can apply here ...
0
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0answers
46 views

When using “unless”, does noun or pronoun come first?

Usually in a sentence, we define the noun before using pronoun when it is clear that the pronoun is referring to a specific noun. For example, "John said that he...." rather than "He said that ...
0
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0answers
58 views

''I hope so.'' vs ''I hope not.''

If I want to agree on a negative sentence, which sentence can I use? How about the following case? A: Believe me.I'm not telling a lie. B:
0
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0answers
64 views

Can a be verb and an ordinary verb share the same subject?

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? An apple is red and has a spherical shape. In comparison, I'm pretty sure that the following sentences are correct: An apple is red and green. ...
0
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0answers
23 views

Is the use of “review”, “has identified”, “has contributed” and “indicate” right?

Is the use of "review", "has identified", "has contributed" and "indicate" right? Thank you. The above studies apply to the research problem because they review lack of nursing programs faculty ...
0
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0answers
30 views

How to pied-pipe “only in respect to which … by … rule”?

I'm trying to pied-pipe the last dependent clause for simplicity, following Prof Lawler's comment: ...but not to legislative facts that will produce adverse consequences to them [//] only in ...
0
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0answers
48 views

“To How” or “In How”?

I have the sentence: "Since that experience, I have made changes to how I address all of my courses." Should I use "to how" or "in how" for any grammatical reason(s), or is it simply a matter of ...
0
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0answers
50 views

Using localising adjectives + adverbial construction with 'where'

I am wondering whether it is possible to use an adverbial phrase with 'where' to describe words like 'ashore' or 'aground'. Examples: I stepped ashore where the sun was filling with a red ...
0
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0answers
77 views

A few contexts with the Present Simple which make me puzzled

These extracts are taken from an old English text book written by A.S. Hornby. 1) A: You were out very late last night. I know! B: Quite right! I was out until three o'clock. And I had too many ...
0
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0answers
71 views

Is it correct to ask “Where are we holding in regards to that” when asking about the status of an application or the like

I was asking a banking rep about a recently submitted application for financing - Where are we holding? Is that grammatically correct? For example - I would ask the question - At what stage is the ...
0
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0answers
84 views

Starting a sentence with “In which”

I sometimes see sentences that begin with "In which", but I can't seem to understand the meaning, e.g.: In which James demonstrates the presentation he's been working on. Is this grammatically ...
0
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0answers
146 views

Where to put the adverb in passive sentences?

While writing another question on this site, I was uncertain about placement of adverbs in passive sentences. It shouldn't frequently be used in the context of immaterial things. It shouldn't ...
0
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0answers
40 views

Contrator, contractee… and disease?

On my security card at work is written "Contractor" in big, bold, capital letters. A thought just crossed my mind (as I work for a medical company): If I am the contractor, am I the one passing the ...
0
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0answers
80 views

Why present simple not continuous

I have a few sentences here: A) The instructor explains the diagram to students who ask questions during the lecture. Why are "explain" and "ask" used here in present simple, and not in the ...
0
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0answers
44 views

All of + possessives

may I ask a question about the correct use of "all of"? As far as understood from a previous post, "of" must be used when followed by a pronoun. What happens with possessives? My example: "beauty in ...
0
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0answers
110 views

Sentence diagramming trouble with figuring out subordinators and relative pronouns

http://imgur.com/a/dyALV for the pictures. In the diagrams my main concern was figuring out if the use of "that" was under the context of it being a relative pronoun or a subordinator. I have trouble ...
-1
votes
0answers
41 views

Are you in need of a circumlocution?

I have found Americans persistent in using the term "in need of" where "need" will do perfectly. I was taught (in British education system) this was verbose and to be avoided at all reasonable costs. ...
-1
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0answers
31 views

Using “for” when talking about continuous actions

Another question rose in my mind, which I haven't been able to find an answer for. And it all revolves around this particular word: "for". For whatever reason I woke up today and suddenly was very ...
-5
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0answers
66 views

Which prepositions after verbs “affect” and “influence”?

I am confused about the prepositions that may come after verbs affect and influence. In what conditions can we use on, over and by?