This tag is about how the grammar works: different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean.

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100 views

Are the cats and dogs of the idiom “it's raining cats and dogs” plural in usage?

I recently heard someone say the following: It's cats and dogs out there! As in "it's raining cats and dogs out there." I then thought that person should have said Those are cats and dogs ...
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49 views

What's the subject in “You, go to the store”?

In the following sentence, what is the function of "You"? You, go to the store. I know the sentence is in the imperative mood, and that generally means there is an implicit second-person ...
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58 views

What is this wordplay called?

"For these people" "For those people" When you say "these", it sounds much more 'personal', especially when done in poetry. Is there a specific literary device to refer to this, or can you just say ...
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365 views

Subject/Complement Agreement. How to describe problem with “The thing is the objects.”

In my ell answer, version 32, I provided the following, problematic, wording (especially bold italic), and I need help to better understand this issue so I can fix my answer:1 The thing is ...
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5 views

doesn't seem to rain/to be raining

What's the difference between 'It doesn't seem to rain.' and 'It doesn't seem to be raining.' Is it that the first is like the rain didn't occur often, and the second like it doesn't rain in the ...
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21 views

Is it “I've heard the story told many times” or “I've heard the story being told many times”?

I've learned that we use a bare infinitive or present participle after see, hear, watch. What happens when the object after these verbs are in a passive situation? For example, is it "I've heard the ...
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17 views

Punctuating sentences with multiple adverb forms

What is generally considered the correct way to punctuate multiple adverb forms in a sentence? E.g., She stood discreetly, close to a bus stop, across the street from the entrance of a modern office ...
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17 views

“Same as” or “same with” in this context?

Here is a quick question. Same with A, we also select this method to evaluate the plan. Same as A, we also select this method to evaluate the plan. Which one is a better way for academic writing? ...
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30 views

“…as interesting as you think” vs “…as interesting as you'd think”?

Speaker A: "You lived in Hawaii? Cool! How was it? Tell me, tell me. Speaker B: "Haha, it wasn't as interesting as you/you'd think. What's the correct option in this case? Or should I have ...
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33 views

Should I use 'among others' or 'such as' in this context?

Here are my constructions: Ability to monitor and configure devices among others the company's Cisco Systems, workstations and servers using open-source and Microsoft software. Ability to ...
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31 views

Where to put the possessive “'s” when there is a presence of a modifier?

I'm studying history and as I came across a structural conundrum that I have no idea how to answer. His successor's, Taft, Standard Oil decision suggested John D. Rockefeller's massive oil ...
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20 views

Conditional cause

I know that there are some formular of conditional sentence If + simple past, would + simple present [e.g: if I were you, I would not go.] If + past perfect, would + present perfect [e.g: if I had ...
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44 views

A “model plane” or a “plane model”: What's the difference?

Which question is correct? If they are both correct, what's the difference between these questions? How do you make a model plane? How do you make a plane model?
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51 views

“May have been” : sequence of tenses

Let us suppose we have such a sentence: John says Marry may have fallen ill. How should we change the sentence if we talk about the past? Is it correct? John said Marry might have fallen ...
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22 views

Name for the repetition evident in “How much larger should it be to be secure?”

I'm editing a post that has the sentence: How much larger should it be to be secure? I've come across other situations where there are repetitions in a sentence (such as that that) and am hoping ...
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45 views

A question on the use of 'since'.

'Since' means throughout the period from a specified point in past time to the present. Can I use it to mean 'throughout the period from a specified point in past time to a specific point also in the ...
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47 views

How to use thereby in the following sentence

Here is the sentence I want to write. Every message will carry some weight thereby inducing some load on the servers. Is this correct?
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36 views

Is it redundant to say “the plot of the story”?

I'm writing a paper about title cards and title sequences in movies and at one point I say These title cards were also used throughout silent films as they were essential to carrying the plot of ...
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99 views

Determining if “than” is used as conjunction or preposition

"than" can be used as a conjunction and as a preposition. I want to be able to tell for any given sentence containing "than" which grammatical function it has in that sentence. My current ...
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61 views

What is a difference between USED TO and PAST SIMPLE

What is a difference between: I used to smoke. I smoked. I used to be a teacher. I was a teacher.
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45 views

“She talked about how…” Grammar Rule

I'm trying to find the grammar rule or name that explains these types of sentences: The movie was about how we all need to love each other. She talked about how there is a great fear of technology. ...
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47 views

Which part of the sentence the bold part refers to?

The following is an excerpt from a USDOS Country report. I am trying to determine, based on the structure of the sentence what does the bold phrase refer to: all the charges or only the charge of ...
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28 views

“Data card deposited with Jon Doe.” Is this sentence correct?

"Data card deposited with Jon Doe." Vs "Data card deposited to Jon Doe." which is the correct sentence? Situation is that some device has been returned to the concerned department personnel.
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50 views

grammatical construct “sitting on the bench”

What is the grammatical construct or part of speech of the following two phrases in italics? Sitting on the bench, the tramp wondered about life. The tramp sitting on the bench wondered about ...
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15 views

How to use “the same as” clause corectly?

Here is a sentence written in a book: the automobile, popularized by Henry Ford, was invented around the same time as the Wright brothers developed the airplane. I found the use of grammar in ...
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26 views

“Question”/“issue” followed by “of”

"This raises the question [of] when the event happened." "This raises the issue [of] whether the Government would approve." Is the inclusion of "of" in these and similar sentences (a) necessary, (b) ...
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59 views

Semicolon usage: is this usage appropriate?

Is this usage of a semicolon grammatical? I understand that it's used to separate two clauses in a sentence, but am uncertain on the validity of its usage in this scenario Sound can be represented ...
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77 views

What is the grammatical function of “in my opinion”?

In phrases such as "X is better than Y in my opinion" what is the grammatical function of the phrase "in my opinion"? I know that prepositional phrases can function as adverbs or adjective depending ...
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34 views

Sound or sounds

There is a sound puzzle board for babies which has many different sounds and plays accordingly. I wonder if I can say "let's play with sound" refering playing with the board; or should it be "play ...
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29 views

Correct grammar: “House of…” or “House for…”

I was recently reviewing a piece for a friend and they had written, "We want to be known as the House for New Art". I believed the grammar should be "House of New Art". Which is correct?
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52 views

Relative and demonstrative pronouns “that” and “those”

I think the sentence the difference between the behaviour of young people today and that of those in the past is correct, as that (relative pronoun) replaces behaviour and those (demonstrative ...
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50 views

Is the 'unmarked'/standard/basic form called the oblique/objective case?

[Source:] This happens because what linguists would call the “unmarked” or standard, basic form for pronouns turns out to be the objective form—me, him, her, them, and the like. This is the form ...
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53 views

What governed present subjunctive uses in archaic English?

Source, para 4 : p 2 of 2, 'Against YA', by Ruth Graham, slate.com Fellow grown-ups, at the risk of sounding snobbish and joyless and old, we are better than this. I know, I know: Live and let ...
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104 views

“In here”, “from here”, and“at here”

I just read the discussed topic "look here vs. look at here". Which one is correct? "Look here" or "Look at here"? I was wondering what the reason is for not using the preposition ...
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49 views

is there a syntactic error in this sentence?

The receptionist’s firm voice was backed by the guild’s evaluation system and by extension the combined effort of many adventurers. I somewhat believe this sentence is right grammatically if ...
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61 views

“I might as well have imagined” vs “I might as well have been remembering”

Which one is the correct form, or at least the most commonly used? Example: 1207 B.C. Wow, I found it impossible to imagine a time as far in the past as that. I might as well have imagined ...
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42 views

Which personal pronouns take dependent clause and which personal pronouns don't take

Note from The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language - (Page no. 507) i. It is I [who am at fault]. ii. It is me [who is at fault]. Example [i] follows the general rules for ...
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54 views

Introductory books for language theory

I have computer science background and I am looking for some NLP algorithms for stemming, POS tagging etc. The language under consideration is "agglutinative and inflectional". Since from CS ...
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440 views

From one to another or From one to the other?

Is there a difference if I say "the recipe varies from one cook to the other" or "the recipe varies from one cook to another"?
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47 views

“Grown substantially” or “substantially grown”?

a non-native speaker with a simple question here. I want to say that a research field has become much bigger in recent years. Is it correct to write Since _____, the field of ______ has grown ...
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67 views

You drove faster than was allowed, so you got a speeding ticket

You drove faster than was allowed, so you got a speeding ticket. I think that the above sentence is grammaticaly correct. Why is not possible to write: You drove faster than it was allowed, so you ...
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819 views

Far more … than meaning

Theft of an idea is far more difficult for proving in court than word-for-word plagiarism. Can far more be used in that sentence? What does it mean?
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69 views

Grammar rules for comparisons with similar structures

The original quote I would rather suffer the pain of discipline than suffer the pain of regret Variations: I would rather suffer the pain of discipline than the pain of regret I would ...
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46 views

OF as a part of speech

What part of speech is the word "of" in the phrase "made of"? Trying to review the word "of" I the command :"Go and make disciples of all nations". Please help
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276 views

Is the term, gone from blank to blank, academically acceptable?

Is the term, gone from (blank) to (blank), academically acceptable? If not what alternatives are there to state the same thing in a more precise manner?
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26 views

Do I say “tabloid and live television, and professional wrestling” or “tabloid television, live television, and professional wrestling”?

This is the sentence I wish to check: "Author Chris Hedges writes about how entertainment industries, like tabloid television, live television, and professional wrestling, showcase crude examples of ...
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58 views

Is my usage of “can apply” correct in the given example?

The concept of different techniques yielding different (though correct) results can apply to the measurement of physical properties such as A, B, C, and D. Is the usage of can apply here ...
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57 views

When using “unless”, does noun or pronoun come first?

Usually in a sentence, we define the noun before using pronoun when it is clear that the pronoun is referring to a specific noun. For example, "John said that he...." rather than "He said that ...
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107 views

''I hope so.'' vs ''I hope not.''

If I want to agree on a negative sentence, which sentence can I use? How about the following case? A: Believe me.I'm not telling a lie. B:
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88 views

Can a be verb and an ordinary verb share the same subject?

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? An apple is red and has a spherical shape. In comparison, I'm pretty sure that the following sentences are correct: An apple is red and green. ...