This tag is not for questions on whether something is grammatical. It's for questions about how the grammar actually works: different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean.

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1answer
8k views

“Where he is” vs “Where is he” [closed]

What is the difference between the following. "You know where he is" and "You know where is he"
6
votes
4answers
3k views

“We are all of us engaged in…” What does 'all of us' mean here?

I read the following sentence in Chicago Sun-Times's review of the movie In Time: We are all of us engaged in the trade of buying and selling time. The sentence sounds grammatically weird to me. ...
8
votes
3answers
968 views

Why some questions are written in this funny way?

There, I did it myself. Instead of asking "Why are some questions written in this funny way?", I produced what strikes me as bad English ever so often: Questions that are formed by starting out with ...
4
votes
3answers
219 views

Is “remains” in “Xenophobia remains in our society” a linking or intransitive verb?

Yet another grammar question. I know that 'remains' can be a linking verb in many contexts, but I'm undecided on whether it is linking in the sentence "Xenophobia remains in our society". I feel ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“Like us” or “like we do”

Do the following two sentences have the same meaning? They go to school like we do. They go to school like us. I know the first one is correct, but I am not sure if the second one is ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

Are there specific rules to build expressions with or without articles?

In English, there are lots of expressions built using articles like: at the station to the cinema play the piano have breakfast (no article) take a bath take a shower Are there specific rules or ...
0
votes
2answers
968 views

Present perfect versus past perfect

I have marked those books yesterday. I had marked those books yesterday. Which sentence is correct? I know that: The present perfect is used when an action begins in the past and continues ...
-1
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2answers
1k views

What do you call someone who is asking for information? [closed]

A petitioner? I'm not sure... Any suggestions?
0
votes
3answers
925 views

Is this slogan proper English? [closed]

We are a group of web developers, creating our online presence ... We chose this slogan, "Web passionate young powers at your service" Is this proper English? Does this hold any "contempt" ...
-1
votes
3answers
228 views

Which usage is more common? (singular / plural) [closed]

Which one of these is more common or better to use? Delete selected Item(s). Or Delete selected Item/s. Note: It should be used in our Document (not a Program).
2
votes
2answers
20k views

“I had sent you”

I received the following email today, we discussed the report before the email where I told the person that I hadn't(also can I use hadn't here) received it. I was wondering if it's all grammatical. ...
-2
votes
4answers
3k views

“Me” or “Myself”- which one is correct here? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it correct to use “yourself” and “myself” (versus “you” and “me”)? you and myself/me will enjoy the function ...
2
votes
5answers
3k views

“It took me all of ten minutes to find out” - what does “it took me” mean? [closed]

I have a little confusion on understanding the sentence: It took me all of ten minutes to find out . Why couldn't it be "I took all of ten minutes to find out"?
2
votes
2answers
639 views

Single or Plural: Asking for names of people

If I were to ask the name of two people, should I say "What is the name of PersonA and PersonB?" because each person has only one name or "What are the names of PersonA or PersonB?" because I am ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Take a walk vs walk

Can we say that I am going to take a walk instead of taking the bus? Or should we say I am going to walk instead of taking the bus?
0
votes
1answer
389 views

Can the word 'freed' be used as an adjective? [closed]

For example: "Freed memory can be reused by another computer programs"?
-2
votes
1answer
498 views

Describing a place that is not very busy [closed]

How would you describe a place, a dorm to be more specific, that's not very crowded? At dorm X there is not a lot of people who live there ( this is my wild guess )
1
vote
3answers
4k views

'much better' spoken rather than written English?

Is it grammatically correct to use in a publication, that something is (a) 'much better' way of doing something?
0
votes
1answer
744 views

Do vs. does in a statement [closed]

In the statement "Editorial use of images do not require a model release." which form of do/does would be correct? Should the verb agree with images (as in "images do not require..."), or with ...
9
votes
2answers
564 views

Stop if you feel faint or pain! [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Ellipsis that results in one word serving as both subject and object I am “adjective” and I am “present continuous” in one sentence I was using some exercise equipment ...
0
votes
2answers
126 views

Wash Hands to Serve Safe Food?

The other day I saw a sign in a restroom saying: Wash your hands thoroughly to kill bacteria and serve safe food It struck me as wrong somehow, since it gave me the immediate humorous mental ...
-1
votes
1answer
194 views

Why can't I put 'a' or 'the' before 'different clubs'? [closed]

Is there a specific rule saying that 'a/an' and 'the' should not followed by the word 'different'? "I go out to different clubs with my boyfriend". I know there are some fixed expression for using ...
1
vote
1answer
766 views

“From around the world” vs “Around the world” [closed]

What is the difference between "from around" and just "around" in the following context or in general? I participated in an event where I met some people from around the world. I participated ...
0
votes
3answers
7k views

“I am trying to learn” vs “I try to learn”

What is the difference between present simple and present progressive when it comes to actions like the following? At school, I am trying to learn a wide array of subjects. At school, I try ...
1
vote
2answers
641 views

Complex reported speech question

I had the following sentence today in my exam: "Would you like to come with us to a service in the Maori Church?" asked my hostess. "Indeed, I would," I replied. What would be the indirct ...
1
vote
1answer
806 views

Make it a compound sentence question

Make it a compound sentence: Enticingly served, it comes in four bowls. I had this today in my exam and I wrote It comes enticingly served in four bowls. Is this correct? If not, what is the ...
0
votes
1answer
18k views

Usage of 'if' and 'if not' to mean 'and perhaps even/also'

Consider the sentence: While this assumption, on its own, is relatively innocuous, if implausible, in practice, it is supplemented by assumptions... The 'if' here really means something more ...
5
votes
4answers
9k views

“So that it be” vs “so that it is”

Recently on IRC I said this: I do not believe in proving the correctness of already constructed programs. I believe in formally deriving programs so that they be correct. And I got almost ...
7
votes
5answers
7k views

Is the phrase 'according to me' correct?

Is the saying "According to me" correct? I believe it's incorrect, and that "In my opinion" is better. Can anyone clarify?
4
votes
1answer
624 views

Whether you need the word 'to' in the sentence - Which place do you want to go to?

Which sentence is correct and why? Which do you want to go to? Which do you want to go? I am a native English speaker and was asked this by a Japanese person. I think number 2 is not correct but I ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

Should you use past tense for a fact that still remains in force?

For example what variant is correct? He was the man who did that first. He is the man who did that first. He himself appeared in a film about his life. He himself appears in a film about his life. ...
-2
votes
1answer
7k views

“Had you been there for quite sometime?”

Can we say "Had you been there for quite some time?" without saying "before" this and that? Or should we rather say "Were you there for quite some time"?
2
votes
0answers
65 views

“You went there?” in English [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it OK to add a question mark to show inflection? Can we say in a conversation "You went there", and by stressing the statement, mean "Did you go?" I know one ...
-1
votes
1answer
655 views

Is the proper phrase “Be Discovered” or “Get Discovered”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is “to get” sometimes used where “to be” could be used? I am working on a website and I'm having a little difficulty selecting an appropriate ...
0
votes
1answer
687 views

while he works or while he working or while he is working [closed]

I want to tell my friend "please take photos while the painter does something" but I don't know which one is correct way to say it. "Please take photos while the painter paints" "Please take photos ...
6
votes
4answers
13k views

Continuous vs contiguous when talking about files

Files on a file system can be fragmented meaning they're split into several parts that are scattered all over hard disk. This usually means that reading these files is much slower because disk ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“Against traffic” or “Against the traffic”

The following first sentence comes from Wikipedia, which 'the' is not used before 'traffic', while the second one comes from BBC, which has 'the' before 'traffic'. I wonder if both usages are correct ...
0
votes
1answer
162 views

Article or no article: “at the price of a higher workload”?

The finer points (the infamous 10%?) of when to use indefinite articles still manage to elude me sometimes. Does the article "a" belong in the following sentence or not? However, [foo] yields ...
1
vote
2answers
825 views

Storytelling In Simple Present

When telling a story in the present tense, what tense should we use for actions that take place before another action in the story, for example: The king turns to his wife, who has already had a ...
-1
votes
2answers
551 views

“Two films don't a revolution make”: is this sentence grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is “xxxx doth not a yyyy make” considered valid English? Proper usage/origin of the generic phrase “[action phrase] does not a [noun] make” “Dazzling ...
2
votes
3answers
807 views

Is this an instance of personification or is it a simile?

I've been sometimes a little confused on how direct personification must be. For example, consider the following phrase used to describe a river: Like a snake it winds through the craggy ...
0
votes
2answers
925 views

“If we were going outside” in polite requests [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Was” or “were” in subjunctive clauses Can we use "if you were going outside, please let me know" or "I was wondering if you were going outside" ...
10
votes
4answers
9k views

Is “It is you who are mistaken!” correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What rules make “Remember me, who am your friend” grammatical? This is a line spoken by the Emperor to Luke in Star Wars. I always wondered if this is grammatically ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Present perfect for past action with present effect

If I seem tired, can I say: "I haven't slept last night"? If not, why have I been told that we use present perfect for actions that have present effects?
3
votes
1answer
500 views

How to Explain Dependent Clause to a German?

I'm trying to help a friend with written English. I told her that I wouldn't be able to provide too much assistance in the way of grammar because I quite frankly just don't know the rules. I'm ...
-1
votes
1answer
3k views

Should I say “another ones” or “another one's” [closed]

Since I'm implying possession should I say another one's and your's? The book could either be yours or another ones. Is it "yours" or "your's" and "another ones" or "another one's"?
2
votes
2answers
5k views

“It's taking me forever” vs “It has been taking me forever”

If you are writing a long report, which one sounds more natural: "Oh, this report is so long, it's taking me forever" or "Oh, this report is so long, it has been taking me forever"?
16
votes
5answers
2k views

I think him to be about 50 or I think he is about 50?

I have two options. Which one is correct? a) I think him to be about 50. b) I think he is about 50 If both are correct, should I avoid one or the other?
-1
votes
4answers
7k views

“More than (what) meets the eye”

Is it correct to say more than what meets the eye? More than meets the eye sounds incorrect, but I've seen a lot of people use it and that confuses me. What acts like an object to the phrase which ...
1
vote
3answers
17k views

“I need to” vs “I will need to”

Can we use "I can't come right now, I need to take a shower" if we are informing a friend? Or should it be "I can't come right now, I will need to take a shower"?