This tag is for questions about how grammar works, e.g. different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean. For questions that ask whether something is grammatical, please use the "grammaticality" tag instead.

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4
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1answer
3k views

Meaning of “x is 35 times less than y" [closed]

I’m not sure of whether this is grammatically correct, although I've encountered the same expression many times before. Most Google searches show it produces 35 times less carbon than the report ...
4
votes
1answer
194 views

Is “Why Steven Sinofsky is out at Microsoft” correct?

The title of this Ars Technica piece reads: Why Steven Sinofsky is out at Microsoft Concretely, I'm wondering why (if) "out at" is correct – I initially thought "out of" would be the correct ...
0
votes
2answers
293 views

When to prepose an auxiliary in a sentence?

I read this at Time.com, and it's in the second line of the third paragraph. And wouldn’t you know it, their theory proved to be both true and statistically meaningful. I suppose it means "And ...
0
votes
1answer
85 views

Is this grammatical: “increasing pace at which” [closed]

Is this grammatical: An understanding is seen as vital due to the increasing pace at which the world's markets are integrating.
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Why is the comma inside quotation marks when people are quoted? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should end punctuation go inside quotes? From a AMS blog post: Some organizations have temporarily suspended their polling, and with the news media tabbing ...
0
votes
3answers
403 views

Explaining the apostrophe in this quotation [closed]

Stumbled upon The Case For Mitt Romney: So far, under Obama, private sector job growth has vastly outpaced the public sector. And the big public unions, like the teachers', have been directly ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Why is it correct to say “He came and said something to me” but not “He came and said to me something”?

This question was just posed to me and I couldn't give a clear answer beyond that the second just feels wrong and one would generally use a direct or indirect quotation, as in "he came and said to me ...
-1
votes
2answers
836 views

Combining 3 sentences [closed]

I am struggling to combine following 3 sentences for a one sentence. I am doubted how to do it. Any suggestions please. a) Most of the above methods often rely on the crown height model (CHM) ...
-1
votes
1answer
297 views

What term describes the relationship between 'collectivism' and 'collectivisation'?

What is collectivism, in terms of grammar, of collectivisation? Put another way: Collectivism is the [which word?] of collectivisation? Another example word pair might be centralism and ...
13
votes
10answers
2k views

What do you call something that is not first in a sequence?

Is there a word to describe something that is not the first element in a sequence, but can be in any other position? A synonym of "not first", in fact. This element is __ in this sequence.
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Would the first letter of the middle of a name such as Christian de Duve need to be capitalized [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can a sentence start with a small letter? ... if you're beginning your sentence with it? Would it be like, "de Duev notes that the molecular world must necessarily... ", ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Is the construct “[subject] allows for [object] to [verb]” correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What’s the difference between ‘allow’ and ‘allow for’? ...or should it be "[subject] allows [object] to [verb]"? I am asking specifically for sentences in the form ...
-1
votes
0answers
34 views

“It doesn't matter” or “it don't matter ”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: The grammaticality of “that don’t impress me much” I am not a native English speaker, but until now what I read was to use does with it. But in a song Don't Matter, Akon ...
3
votes
4answers
482 views

Nouns and determiners

Are singular non-proper countable nouns always preceded by a determiner (a, the, some, any, this, that)? ORIGINAL QUESTION: "Dose singular no-proper [Are singular common] nouns always preceded by ...
0
votes
3answers
226 views

Why is the pronoun required in the sentence “I know it is…”? [closed]

I am volunteering for an ESL program and one of my students wrote: I know is very rare. As a native English speaker, I know that "it" is required. But I'm struggling to come up with an ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

The usage of “the” with “least”

The main issue here is how to sort out the usage of "the" with "least". Sometimes it's clear but there are cases when I am not sure whether to use the article "the" or not. Least with verb The ...
5
votes
3answers
344 views

How can one determine if the opposite of an agent noun exists?

We know that the employer employs the employee and that the tutor tutors the tutee, but how do we know if the shooter shot the shootee? Is there a simple way to determine if an agent noun can be made ...
1
vote
4answers
757 views

Does “I am thirsty to die” make sense?

"I am hungry to die" doesn't mean that I am dying because of hunger, rather, "I want to die a lot." How about "I am thirsty to die?" Does this mean "I am dying because of thirst?" I want to know ...
0
votes
3answers
23k views

How to know when to use “someone” or “anyone”?

I am trying to write a grammar rule that will be able to identify when to use someone or anyone, and I got confused. I couldn't find any clear way to do this. For instance, "anyone can do it" is ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Should I use “the number/s of” “is/are” here? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A number of students” vs “The number of students” In this sentence: The number/s of tourists from A and B is/are 100 and 50 respectively. The number of OR the ...
11
votes
4answers
713 views

How much not better than average is enough?

This is adapted from a silly conversation I had about a baseball player. It set me wondering how to describe this sort of wordplay linguistically. HIM: Do we leave Jay in center? HER: He's ...
0
votes
3answers
183 views

“If a huge quake was to hit” — what is it grammatically? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why have the subjunctive and indicative converged in Modern English? When should I use the subjunctive mood? “If I was” or “If I were”. Which is more common, and which is ...
0
votes
2answers
469 views

Mixed tenses in a sentence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: ‘Had’ or ‘has’ to describe a past condition which is still present? Tense change: previous actions on something that's currently true The employee was injured while ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

“going to” vs “will”

I know several questions were asked about the difference between "going to" and "will". Based on several answers (see, for instance, here, here and here), I understood that "will" is more spontaneous ...
5
votes
5answers
1k views

What is going on in this sentence?

I was helping my brother study for the SAT, and we came across this sentence: While it was different from all the other classes he had taken, Eric was unhappy with his psychology class. The ...
3
votes
2answers
6k views

Usage of “to be done” [closed]

The following is a transcript of the well-known recorded lecture by Prof. Michael Sandel of Harvard University (the cited portion starts at 43:36): The only argument this painter makes is that the ...
3
votes
4answers
13k views

Is “is been” a valid construction?

I have found sentences in some contexts which surprisingly use "is" and "been" together: He is been watching too much television lately. She is been feeling a little depressed. The compiler is been ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Much of it is” or “Much of it are”? [closed]

I'm writing an college-entrance essay and for me it's imperative that I understand and implement the correct one of these two expressions: "Much of it is" or "Much of it are" If you need ...
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votes
1answer
318 views

At what usage level does a grammatical error become acceptable? [closed]

Is there any rule for the usage level of a grammatical error above which it is no longer treated as an error?
0
votes
1answer
18k views

What grammar structure is “having + [verb]-ed”? [closed]

I asked this question on another site, but have not received any answers. What grammar structures are these? Having finished his reading he went out for a stroll. She reproach me with ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

Interrogative sentences without auxiliary verbs and declarative sentences with auxiliary verbs [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it OK to add a question mark to show inflection? Sometimes, auxiliary verbs or helping verbs are not present in some interrogative sentences in some specific contexts ...
1
vote
2answers
10k views

The right usage of “basically” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “have basically been doing something” or “have been basically doing something” I'm searching basically for conversation classes" or I'm basically searching ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

Adverb vs. direct object [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What exactly is an “adverb”? Consider the following sentences: She went home. He swam yesterday. Are the words "home" and "yesterday" adverbs or direct ...
7
votes
5answers
545 views

Cooking apples and cleaning ladies

Consider the following sentences: Cooking is my favourite activity. Cooking apples are essential for this recipe. Cooking functions in the first sentence as a gerund. How does it function in the ...
-3
votes
2answers
8k views

Should I use “is” or “are” in this sentence [closed]

Could anyone please tell me which one of these sentences is correct? If you are thinking about it, chances are that so is many others! If you are thinking about it, chances are that so are many ...
0
votes
3answers
101 views

“allow a home run to” or “allow a home run from”?

I came across a baseball news and noticed the author used some pitcher "allows a home run to" some batter, not "allows a home run from." The batter hit the home run, so it seems to me that "allow a ...
-1
votes
1answer
6k views

What is the origin of the “should of” instead of “should have” mistake? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How did the use of “could of” and “should of” originate, and is it considered correct? Recently, I tend to stumble a lot over the mistake that people write should of ...
-2
votes
1answer
60 views

The range of attributive

I have a clause from DirectX SDK as below: The position, velocity, and orientation of sound sources and listeners in 3D space are represented by Cartesian coordinates what's the range of world ...
3
votes
7answers
2k views

Is “unpeeling an orange” grammatically correct?

I found this unsourced reference. Which made me wonder if it is correct or not? Could this be considered an "auto-antonym" like ravel and unravel?
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Why can we use “die” in the present progressive tense? [closed]

"Ask her to wait a moment - I am almost done. " Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855), while working, when informed that his wife is dying. Why can we use "die" in the present progressive tense?
2
votes
2answers
832 views

Is there a grammatical error in the following sentence?

There is either one or no errors in the following statement. Every spring in rural Vermont the sound of sap dripping into galvanized metal buckets signal the beginning of the traditional season ...
5
votes
1answer
154 views

is there any reason to write Computer Science, Department of

On some universities’ web pages, like Oxford university, they write: Computer Science, Department of For me it is more intuitive to say: Department of Computer Science Can somebody explain ...
1
vote
2answers
116 views

Can I say, “Choose your true, new flavour”? [closed]

What the phrase is expressing is, "Choose what's truly your favourite flavour". Can I say, "Choose your true, new flavour"?
36
votes
5answers
4k views

Is “the girls are want to gossip” correct?

Is this the correct use and placement of want? The girls in the office are want to gossip. Does anyone have a reference citing this use?
-1
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2answers
248 views

“Layman” and gender equality

Is it correct to write: He wants to explain X concept to the layman, not before warning him ... Or should I write: He wants to explain X concept to the layman, not before warning him or her ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What is perfect in present perfect continous tense? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is 'present perfect' present if it happened in the past? And why is it 'perfect'? This is a mystery for me. Why do we say perfect in tenses, for ...
1
vote
1answer
447 views

Which are the main and subordinate clauses in this sentence?

Which are the main and subordinate clauses in the following sentence? Individual components do not directly depend on other components, which means that they can be more easily developed in ...
3
votes
2answers
322 views

Can all question words be followed by “the hell”?

What the hell did I marry? Why the hell did I marry? When the hell did I marry? Where the hell did I marry? ... Can all question words be followed by "the hell"?
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Confused by the past tense and the present tense

Suppose I'm talking about some design scheme. I say something like "foo was once designed and implemented in a way called bar that ...". Then I want to introduce the original scheme "bar", for ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Do I need one or more commas in this sentence?

May I suggest that you keep on searching Asda or better yet go back to Primark. It looks as if at least one comma is needed here. I was thinking: May I suggest that you keep on searching Asda ...