This tag is for questions about how grammar works, e.g. different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean. For questions that ask whether something is grammatical, please use the "grammaticality" tag instead.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
1answer
171 views

Yet another question about the pronunciation of the letter i

First, let's not talk about the long i (as in the name of the letter) or the short i (as in 'incorrect') pronunciations. This question is about the third and usually not talked about pronunciation - ...
3
votes
3answers
240 views

subject - verb - ? and parsing

Compare these 2 sentences: The capital of Belgium is Brussels. Brussels is the capital of Belgium. I have a few questions: What is the grammatical name of the non-subject, non-verb part in the ...
0
votes
1answer
477 views

Only requires or requires only [duplicate]

I am always unsure about the position of "only" in the sentence. For example: This ticket only costs 5 dollars. This ticket costs only 5 dollars. Are there any difference? Which one is ...
-2
votes
1answer
93 views

What to use : “that” or “who”? [duplicate]

Consider this sentence : "I was going down the hill and on my step down I saw a guy who appeared to be disguised". "I was going down the hill and on my step down I saw a guy that appeared to be ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

How to ask this as question [duplicate]

I am wondering how to turn the following into a question "Narendra Modi is the 18th Prime Minister of India" How to ask this as question, so that answer will be 18th I have tried searching ...
4
votes
3answers
4k views

Why “like doing something” or “like to do something” but only “dislike doing something”?

At a further education course for teachers, in Switzerland, (given by two native speakers of English), someone came up with the question of whether you could say "dislike doing something" and "dislike ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

What size of number should be written in digits as opposed to spelt out? [duplicate]

I was taught that small numbers should be written with letters and not numerals. For example "5" would be "five". I've heard conflicting rules and am wondering what the largest number that should be ...
3
votes
2answers
409 views

word order in superlatives: “She booked the earliest flight to London she could.” or “She booked the earliest flight she could to London.”?

What is the correct (Ooops, I'm afraid it's me again! rule-o-cratic French speaker), preferred, then, word order in a superlative? "She booked the earliest flight she could back to London." or "She ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Why can “which” and “who” be dropped in some sentences? [duplicate]

These two sentences are trying to express the same thought: Now we examine the trunk, which is also called the boot, especially outside North America. Now we examine the trunk, also called ...
1
vote
3answers
6k views

Use of “ and so”

If "and so" connects predicates such that the second is the result of the first, do we need to repeat the same words in the second? For example, It does not exist locally and so globally. or ...
0
votes
2answers
537 views

Possessive of crowds

The subheading of this news story says, "Threatened showers don't mute crwods' enthusiasm" [sic]. Separate from the misspelling of crowds, is it appropriate for the apostrophe to go before or after ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

In the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-centuries; suspended hyphen [duplicate]

How would you suggest to list centuries here: Suspended hyphen: In the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-centuries... Separated by commas: In the late nineteenth-, and early twentieth-, ...
1
vote
1answer
534 views

Are there rules governing pre- and/or post-modification of noun groups by participial adjectives?

Which of the expressions "supplies needed" and "needed supplies" is / are correct? Have we now received all the needed supplies? Have we now received all the supplies needed? Is there a ...
1
vote
3answers
868 views

“be about to” and “soon”, “immediately”

I am wondering whether I can use "be about to" and "soon" or "immediately" in one sentence? I found online that the following two sentences "The medical team is about to start immediately" and "He is ...
2
votes
2answers
444 views

“Hadn't I” vs. “Didn't I” [closed]

Which one of the sentences is the correct, and why? I had breakfast yesterday, hadn't I? I had breakfast yesterday, didn't I?
2
votes
4answers
467 views

What type of grammar construction is this

She thinks herself able to best him in this argument. She thinks that she is able to best him in this argument. She thinks herself to be able to best him in this argument. Are the first and the ...
0
votes
4answers
588 views

what is the meaning of “total of” followed by three categories

If I said "a total of 100 quality engineers and inspectors," does this imply the number of engineers and inspectors add up to 100? If not, how would I phrase the sentence to mean the number of ...
0
votes
5answers
22k views

Is this correct "I'll be looking forward to helping.. ? Read on please

First of all some background. An acquaintance asked by email if I'm willing to offer advice on a project he's starting to develop. I answered yes for sure.He responded Wonderful,Stay tuned. I have no ...
2
votes
3answers
835 views

Is the word a or an used if it is in front of 80%? [closed]

Here is the sentence I'd like to use: I reviewed the applications of those who passed the written test with an 80% or higher.
0
votes
1answer
777 views

Difference between “There is to be” “there has to be” [closed]

"There is to be an urgent ministerial review of language learning." Does this mean that the review is going to take place, or does this mean that there should be a review? I am a little clueless.
-2
votes
2answers
3k views

“Are you kidding me?”- Is it grammatically correct? [closed]

I often hear people saying "Are you kidding me?". To me this is grammatically wrong- it should be "Are you kidding?", full stop. "Are you kidding me?" sounds wrong, but is it actually wrong?
0
votes
1answer
23k views

Is “keep updated” proper usage of those words?

I'm far from being an English major, but I have a simple question. If someone were to say keep updated in a sentence, is that correct? I know the usage, tense, and other things matter, but is it ...
5
votes
6answers
3k views

Does the word Effortless imply a negative or a positive comment?

I watched a TV show where a group of dancers were performing a number. After that, the host interviewed one of the audience and he was told that the Group A's performance was effortless and gave a low ...
5
votes
2answers
43k views

“On a page” or “in a page” for a web page

Which is the correct usage: Something on a page OR Something in a page By page, I mean a web page, not a physical book page.
0
votes
1answer
9k views

“Internship at” or “Internship in”?

Which one is correct in what case? I have found someone suggesting that you use "at" for organizations and "in" for fields or disciplines, e.g., I've got an internship at NATO, and he's got an ...
0
votes
3answers
14k views

Is it correct to say “ have been not” in English? [closed]

For example , is it correct to say that " The service has been not available since 3 days ago ". And, Is the meaning of it different from "The service has't been available since 3 days ago" Edit: ...
-3
votes
1answer
107 views

“gone flow by”-Is this phrase correct? [closed]

"gone flow by". What are the problems in it?
5
votes
2answers
5k views

is “I does” grammatically correct? [closed]

I heard the following in a song: "It's my world, I does what I wish to" I wondered if this is correct and if it means same as "I do what I wish to"
2
votes
2answers
139 views

“compared with” vs “in comparison with” vs “assessed in comparison with” [closed]

what would you consider more appropriate? -"She is writing her thesis under my guidance on a topic related to the Australian tax system compared with the European one", -"She is writing her thesis ...
0
votes
3answers
167 views

Can you use 'correlation' in the following form? [closed]

Is this a correct usage of 'correlation"? Studies indicates a correlation between A with B? Ex: Studies indicates a correlation between early exposure to music and song with future success in math ...
0
votes
1answer
94 views

“the” before “condition” [closed]

Should we write "the" before the word "condition"? that is,if two conditions A and B are known which of the following is correct? Conditions A and B. or The Condition A and B.
0
votes
2answers
1k views

How correct is the Southern colloquialism “y'all” in correct English grammar?

Have I capitalized and punctuated correctly above? (Note the space between last letter and question mark in title? (We'll, it was there!))
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Is this grammatically correct: “It has happened for a while now.”

If not, why? I think it sounds awkward but I cannot be sure it's incorrect.
2
votes
2answers
6k views

Geometric or Geometrical?

I have read the excellent answers to Why is it "geometric" but "theoretical" - my question is specifically about usage. Is there a best practice for deciding between the variants "geometric" and "...
-1
votes
4answers
7k views

“May not have [noun]” or “may have not [noun]”

Which of the following is correct: may not have or may have not? For example, which sentence should one write? They may not have apples. They may have not apples.
-1
votes
1answer
303 views

(plural noun) “are” never “a” good idea. [closed]

I'd like to know how to explain the grammar in this kind of sentences. It seems to me that the plural noun here works like a collective noun... Or does it purely depend on the context rather than some ...
0
votes
2answers
8k views

Is 'have having had' correct English? [closed]

How does one deal with have having had a messy relationship breakup? or How does one deal with have having had a near-death experience? This intuitively seems be correct English, but it's also ...
0
votes
1answer
195 views

What is the correct grammar? [closed]

Which phrase is correct grammar? At a recent funeral of a married couple whu died 2 days apart, the funeral home printed the following phrase on the bulletin. "2 life's well lived" Or "2 lives well ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Is back-shifting necessary in speech and writing [duplicate]

Can I say "I told you he is going to the book club" when he has already gone there by now; or is it necessary to back-shift it to past i.e. "I told you he was going to the book club". So will I be ...
-1
votes
1answer
6k views

use of “also” vs. “and also”

In the following, which is better to write between two sentences: ". Also" or ", and also" : Another drawback in the convenient setting is that operational vector fields do not have integral ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

Using “will” in a sentence vs not using “will”

I'm an ESL teacher. A student asked me a question regarding this sentence. "Don't phone Ann now. She'll be busy." The student asked me why we have to use "will" in the sentence. Why shouldn't the ...
1
vote
1answer
117 views

When writing a title, do you capitalize “the” in names like “Boris The Animal”? [duplicate]

When writing a title, do you capitalize "the" in names like "Boris The Animal", "Mike the Bike Guy" or "Tom The Dancing Bug"?
11
votes
3answers
1k views

down the hall to the left

Why do people say like "down the hall, road, alley, etc" when it is not down in any way. Why can't we say like "it's straight this corridor, road, etc"?. Why do say "it's straight down this corridor, ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Regarding the tense of that clause after “make sure”

As for the tense of that clause after "make sure", what is the difference between present tense or future tense. Thank you so much!
16
votes
4answers
4k views

Saying something is “for real” vs just saying something is “real”

I have a silly question that's been stuck in my head for a little bit. There was a movie that came out a little while ago called, "Heaven is for real" ... and something about the word "for" in that ...
1
vote
2answers
148 views

Why do we say “talk about the telephone” but “talk about televison”?

Teachers and native speakers :) I was doing exercises about passive, came across these two sentences: "When was the telephone invented?" and "When was television invented?" (without "the") And we say "...
4
votes
7answers
2k views

Is it possible to write an infinite sentence that is grammatically correct? [closed]

I was wondering if this was technically possible in English. I did not know if there are specific grammar rules that would make an infinite sentence impossible.
1
vote
3answers
147 views

Fragmented questions

How should the following sentence be punctuated: If it's not raining, where should we go? The lake? The beach? I ask because the last two questions are fragments.
0
votes
2answers
272 views

Adjectives in places of adverbs

I was reading this thread, and I thought asking this question again in Usage forum would make my understanding more clear. I am briefly explaining the question here. She plays it cool. He ...
1
vote
2answers
90 views

What is this emphasis “did”?

And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks that the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him. Is this archaic? I see many instances of this usage where simple verbs would be enough in ...