This tag is for questions about how grammar works, e.g. different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean. For questions that ask whether something is grammatical, please use the "grammaticality" tag instead.

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6
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4answers
5k views

Which is correct: “on two weeks” or “in two weeks”?

In below sentence it's mentioned "on two weeks": They'll quite happily squander a whole year's savings on two weeks in the sun. whereas so far I learned to speak in this way: They'll ...
-1
votes
1answer
3k views

Can I say “Very welcome to talk to you”?

Scenario: A friend wants to talk with me about something that makes her sad, but she's busy at the moment and wants talk later. I want to express that I'll be pleased to listen to her. Can I say: ...
4
votes
8answers
778 views

What's a word for “stopping a habit”? [duplicate]

What is a suitable word for stopping doing something that had already became part of our habit, like drinking wine or to stop drinking beer? I had a computer dictionary and the word that comes out is ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“as much as” vs. “as much as is”"

In a textbook, I read this sentence: Stretch your arms as much as is comfortable for you. But can you say it without the is? Stretch your arms as much as comfortable for you. Is there any ...
3
votes
2answers
323 views

Is “Who is he?” ok when we don’t know the sex?

Suppose I see someone coming whose gender is unknown; how should I ask who the approaching person is? Should I say “Who is he?”
2
votes
3answers
137 views

Is this a proper use of a semicolon and the word “whom”?

PCAs are usually assigned to an individual with a physical, mental, behavioral, or emotional handicap; whom they work with throughout the year. Is this sentence grammatically correct? I know ...
4
votes
0answers
498 views

Guide to English Articles [closed]

I'm looking for a full and complete guide to English articles like THE, A, AN, (none). Can anyone recommend me something like that? I'd like to finally learn this and never make a mistake again. ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

“created at” or “created in”

I'm making a program and I need to label a "creation date" field. I'm not sure whether to write Created in __ or Created at __
0
votes
3answers
756 views

General rules for identifying conditional sentences?

I am trying to identify the subject and object in the following sentence: Come to me, and I'll give you a fight you'll never forget At first, it appeared as if whenever a conjunction appears ...
6
votes
5answers
6k views

“When I'm sad, I stop being sad and be awesome instead”

In "How I met your mother" TV series, there is a character Barney Stinson, who is the author of this semi-popular quote: When I'm sad, I stop being sad and be awesome instead. [sic!] Obviously, ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

could versus be able

Let me start by saying what is written in grammar books on this issue and after that I will put my question. (Take heed that this usage of "could" ONLY refers to the past and ONLY to affirmative ...
-2
votes
1answer
99 views

Incentive Structure Biased [closed]

Can nonhuman things have bias? Politicians are subject to an incentive structure biased toward the adoption of projects and programs with highly visible immediate benefits and well-hidden costs. ...
-1
votes
2answers
529 views

The Present Perfect vs The Past Tense in English [closed]

Would you agree that the present perfect is used more than the past tense by native speakers to emphasize the situation at hand? Some languages, like Arabic and Japanese, use the simple past much ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

“when” + conditional sentence + tense

1: She said she would do it when she came home. 2: She said she would do it when she comes home. Which is correct, and why?
3
votes
3answers
300 views

Is the use of the word “irony” correct in this paragraph?

I recently came across a Facebook post, about a city in India known as Patiala. I was arguing with the admin, about the correct usage of the word irony. Is the word correctly used in the following ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

“Hold Out Promise” vs “Make a Promise”

Is "hold out a promise" the same meaning as "make a promise"? Or did I misunderstand them? I found definitions for "make a promise", but couldn't find definitions for "hold out a promise".
-2
votes
3answers
1k views

Is it correct to use “either” and “too” interchangeably?

The other day, I heard someone say: I want it either. It comes strange to me. I'm usually used to hear/say: I want it too. Is it grammatically correct to use either of them?
2
votes
3answers
89 views

X should have Y to Z (in the past)

I was doing some literature homework today, when I became confused as to whether or not the following sentence is grammatical: X and Y should have killed Z to have prevented Z from killing them. ...
0
votes
1answer
7k views

“Overlaid” or “overlain” as an adjective [closed]

I have a set of three images, which I have put on top of each other in an image editing program and made transparent. I would like the filename to describe what I have done with the component images. ...
0
votes
3answers
606 views

a hard close look [closed]

Are "close" and "hard" the same below? He took a close look at the cat. He took a hard look at the cat. Or are they subtly different? For this particular usage, web dictionaries appear ...
1
vote
3answers
976 views

Purpose For, Of [closed]

1 He has no intention for marriage. 2 He has no intention of marriage. These two sentences are good English and have the same meaning. In this PDF I read: A review of the grading permit ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

'Has found' versus 'found' [duplicate]

When would one say "she has found her keys" as opposed to "she found her keys"? Are they equivalent, or at least partially equivalent? I'm not a native speaker and have been unable to find a pattern ...
0
votes
1answer
85 views

“X is famous” vs. “X was famous” [duplicate]

When saying a sentence like: Nikola Tesla __ famous because he was a genius. Should the blank be replaced by is or was? Or is it dependent on when the person is/was famous? If so, what exactly ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

How to ask “Where are you going?” when event already passed? [closed]

If my friend went to somewhere on weekend but i didn't know where did he go? And if i want to ask him like "Where are you going?" on Monday which sentences should i ask him? Where did you go? Where ...
1
vote
3answers
751 views

How to use the question mark in multiple choice questions?

Which one of the following three forms is correct for a multiple choice question? Do you prefer the blue dress? or the red shirt? Do you prefer the blue dress or the red shirt? Do you ...
6
votes
2answers
5k views

“Suspect” versus “Suspicious” as Adjectives

A recent question on this site ("to suspect" vs "to be suspicious of") asks about the difference between "to suspect" and "to be suspicious of." An even more complicated situation ...
3
votes
3answers
31k views

“on par with” vs “on a par with”

Which of "on par with" and "on a par with" is the more correct way of saying that two things are of equal value, and why? Examples from a couple of google searches: "His verbal intelligence was not ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

“to suspect” vs “to be suspicious of”

What's the difference between "to suspect someone" vs "to be suspicious of someone"? For example, what's the difference between these two sentences: I'm sorry for suspecting you. I'm sorry for ...
3
votes
3answers
14k views

'Keeping up-to-date on' or 'Keeping up-to-date with'?

I recently replied to someone who was informing me about my application for something. I replied "Thank you for keeping me up-to-date on my application". Afterwards I wondered if I should have written ...
2
votes
2answers
311 views

Can “with” be replaced by “to” after verbs? [closed]

Does this replacement change the meaning to something wrong? Examples: I came with her or I came to her I talk with you or I talk to you
4
votes
5answers
11k views

When is “to” a preposition and when the infinitive marker?

I want to see you. I look forward to seeing you. How can one say "to" in the first sentence is an infinitive marker and in the second sentence a preposition when we are given just the ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Why does “want” take a preposition but “insist” does not?

Why can't you say: "I insist you to do that!" After all, you can say: "I want you to do that!" What's the difference between these two verbs, that they need to be used in sentences ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

None have showed up? Huh? [duplicate]

Has the language really changed this much in twenty years? "None of your students have showed up" - a sentence supplied by this very website as a proper one - seems wrong on two counts to me. Twenty ...
3
votes
3answers
19k views

Is “curious of” acceptable or even better than “curious about”?

Many speakers and internet writers seem to use "curious of" in place of "curious about". For example: I am curious of what he thinks. This is in spite of what seems to be, by the rules of ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“Need to” as an English Modal

In my studies of both theoretical and applied English linguistics, we studied English modals more than once. So a question came up on this site earlier today. I explained that "need to" is a modal. ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

To Be Used Of/For

Does "to be used OF" mean "to be used FOR": wikipedia The English term "empiric" derives from the Greek word ἐμπειρία, which is cognate with and translates to the Latin experientia, from which ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

How to express “From the point of view of Information Theory”?

I would like start a sentence with "From the point of view of information theory, ...", but this sounds a bit uneloquent to me. Can I say, "From an information theoretical point of view, ...", or ...
-1
votes
2answers
171 views

Post Question To

If Craig wrote a question on an online forum and the question was intended for Larry: Craig posted a question to Larry. Should the part "to Larry" modify "a question", or "posted"? In ...
1
vote
2answers
8k views

… 'can be found in' 'can be found on' ? (Prepositions)

Which is the correct way of saying, the document can be found in www.example.com/ark or the document can be found on www.example.com/ark or the document is located at www.example.com/ark
0
votes
1answer
218 views

On His Post, At His Post

I have this: link On 21-22 April 1914, while leading three picket launches admist heavy enemy fire, McCloy was wounded but remained on his post, enabling cruisers to save American lives. For ...
-1
votes
4answers
1k views

Correct preposition for “porch”

I would like to know whether 'I park my car 'on the porch' or 'in the porch' is correct?
1
vote
2answers
130 views

He _____ his ego [closed]

When talking about not letting one's 'ego' prevent oneself from helping his enemies: He __ his ego and helped his enemies. Would "swallow", "hide", "put down", "lay down" work there?
1
vote
1answer
162 views

With + adverb structure

The strange example makes me confused - with + adverb : "Red items need dealing with immediately after the process..." How correct and common of this structure?
0
votes
1answer
628 views

get as far as doing something [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the meaning of “get as far as doing something”? According to my dictionary, we can use this expression to talk about how much progress someone makes, or how much ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

“as far as” vs. “so far as” vs. “in so far as”

Are these sentences the same? As far as I know, he's going to Chicago. So far as I know, he's going to Chicago. In so far as I know, he's going to Chicago. I think that they are the ...
1
vote
2answers
161 views

“as far as” vs. “to”

Is "as far as" the same as "to" in these sentences? I read as far as the third chapter. I read to the third chapter. and I'm going by train as far as London. I'm going by train to ...
-2
votes
2answers
277 views

Can you help me to formally define the phrase “to edit <something>”?

I am in a situation on Meta Stack Overflow in which I dispute the validity of the system notification text "Code in your answer has been edited", because there was no code in the answer before the ...
6
votes
2answers
34k views

Which one is correct? “has been taken already” or “has already been taken”

I'm creating a registration form. I want to display a message if a particular username already exists. So which sentence is correct? This username has already been taken by another user. Please ...
1
vote
2answers
612 views

“Somehow” or “In somehow”?

So far I had never found "somehow" used with "in". Is still this the normal adverb? Could I use "somehow" alone? Ex: I'll fit you in somehow.