This tag is for questions about how grammar works, e.g. different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean. For questions that ask whether something is grammatical, please use the "grammaticality" tag instead.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

2
votes
1answer
56 views

Is “intrigued” an adjective or past participle in “I was intrigued when you called me”?

I've found dictionary entries supporting both situations: for adjective: http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/intrigued for verb: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/intrigue I'd go ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

When “any” (whatever) is followed by a countable noun, does the noun need to be plural?

This is an extract from a formal certificate written by a non-native English speaker. This certification is issued to the bearer for any possible uses. Is it correct? Personally, I think it should ...
2
votes
1answer
26 views

Is there any difference between how and that?

Is there any difference between "how" and "that" in the following sentences? It’s a funny thing how most people that meditate don’t use the word meditate. It’s a funny thing that most people that ...
3
votes
2answers
83 views

a grammar question : to be in adjective clause [closed]

Please explain the grammar of this sentence: She was the first woman to be nominated for the national prize. Why do we use "to be" here? And is it necessary?
0
votes
1answer
101 views

“Should never have been” or “should have never been”? [duplicate]

Example: Methamphetamine should have never been created. or Methamphetamine should never have been created. Which one is correct? This seems like it should have a simple answer, but ...
1
vote
2answers
77 views

What is the verb form of “Enjambment”?

I wish to say in a poetry commentary something like: These two enjambing lines demonstrate... I know enjambing is not a real word, but I wish for something to substitute.
6
votes
2answers
192 views

Are stative verbs always inchoative when used with an imperative?

Wikipedia says that stative verbs are always inchoative when used as imperatives. However, negative imperatives are used to exhibit prohibition in "including the giving of prohibition," and saying ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

The same as +object or possessive pronoun

Tony has the same book as I do (He now has my very book). Tony has the same book as mine (His book is a copy of my book,it has the same title,written by the same writer). Tony's car is the same as ...
3
votes
2answers
91 views

How to Correctly Imply Possession for the Surname “Camus”

My surname is Camus. Spoken by the French it is correctly pronounced "Camu" (loosing the "s"), but spoken by the English it is all too often pronounced "Camus" using the "s". This leads to a slight ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Which sentence is phrased correctly [closed]

I think you set the bar of expectations too high for this product. I think you set the bar of expectations for this product too high. Do both work, or is one of those worded wrong?
0
votes
0answers
48 views

Need quotation marks here? [duplicate]

I want to write: When God beckons man, he remains insensible and continues to have faith in his reliance upon himself, unwilling to be a burden on God. In this context, the "faith" does not ...
3
votes
1answer
104 views

Why are the “first conditional”, “second conditional”, and “third conditional” so named?

I have learned a lot about the first, second and third conditionals, but something that always crossed my mind is why they are called 1st, 2nd and 3rd. Does anyone have an explanation for this? ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

General term for the polite part in an imperative sentence [duplicate]

Taking a few variations of an imperative sentence "Tidy your room": Please tidy your room Kindly tidy your room Tidy your room please Is there a generic term for the "Please" and "Kindly" part of ...
1
vote
2answers
57 views

Should I use quotation marks here?

I am writing a review of a French film named Les Choristes. I want to describe the troubled children in the film in this way "Those students are experts at defying teachers, they are the inventors of ...
-1
votes
1answer
49 views

Difference between “in” and “on” in this context [closed]

I was reading a book when I came across this phrase: Write a program that displays the phrase "Programming is fun" in your window. I am confused about the usage of "in" here. I think it ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Using of verbs in Noun clauses

I suggested you see a doctor. I suggested you saw a doctor. What is the difference between them as I know in noun clauses "that" and " should" may be omitted, but can we use "saw" after modal verb ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

written in, written on, written to the file [closed]

Which one is grammatically correct? The statement is written on the file. The statement is written in the file. The statement is/was written to the file. I should mention that I am talking about a ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Use of an object pronoun to introduce an explanatory clause

I am not sure about the use of an object pronoun here to introduce the explanatory clause. It seems right to me (maybe it is not), but I can't find any grammatical explanation for it. If it is not ...
8
votes
8answers
939 views

does the word “or” use Inclusive or Exclusive logic on my test? and how do I identify the logic that is being used? [duplicate]

I had taken a multiple choice business test the other day and the question was the following: 1. In Microsoft Word, the scissors function would be used to: A) Cut or select certain ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

“Attack on all of humanity” or “attack against humanity”: which is better? [closed]

Hello ladies and gentlemen, this is Semin from Turkey. I'm wondering which of the following is better in terms of grammar and meaning: I strongly condemn the terrorist attacks in Brussels. ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

“suggest you follow” or “suggest you to follow”?

For example, is it: We strongly suggest you follow the official guide. Or: We strongly suggest you to follow the official guide. ?
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Can anyone advise on a guide to the usage of “enote”?

I am looking to use "enote" in a mathematical description where the symbol occurs before the concept, and denote seems inappropriate. (I suppose with rewriting this can be overcome, but that's a ...
1
vote
3answers
75 views

What part of speech is 'as' in this sentence?

Science doesn't fare as well for pessimists. They not only have lower levels of happiness compared to optimists, but research shows that people with negative thoughts are 3 times as likely to ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Singular subjects, plural pronouns [duplicate]

"My lesson plans come from each student as they walk in the door." It's very clunky to say, "As he or she walks in the door." Verbal usage is typically "they." Are there any solutions out there? ...
1
vote
2answers
63 views

Because of a reason vs for a reason

When people say "Everything happens for a reason" it sounds like that "reason" is in the future. Is my interpretation wrong? If not, how do I clearly state that "Everything happens due to cause and ...
-1
votes
1answer
83 views

Do you italicize fictional company names? [closed]

Generally in fiction writing, you don't italicize company names (even though you would italicize the name of a newspaper). But what do you do if the company name is fictional, especially a name that ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

How is the sentence “My mama don't like you, but she likes everyone” correct?

I just heard Love yourself by Justin Bieber. I thought I heard "My mama didn't like you but she likes everyone" from the song. Then later I found lyrics on some websites(listed bellow) but it's not ...
2
votes
1answer
74 views

Is “put someone on/over to” for “put someone through/connect someone to” idiomatic?

Where in the English speaking world do they say, "put someone on/over [to]" for "put someone through/connect someone [to]" as in: If you'd like to speak direct to one of our technicians about ...
0
votes
5answers
105 views

“With tiredness and underperformance the result” - Two adjacent noun phrases

Does anyone know what sort of grammar rule is applied in this sentence (the bold part)? I've never seen this before: ... something we should all spend roughly one-third of our time doing, but ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

“people aged from 15 to 24” vs “people ages from 15 to 24”: which is grammatically correct?

Here is a sentence excerpted from an APA psychological research paper, Teen suicide is a growing health concern. It is the third-leading cause of death for young people ages 15 to 24, surpassed ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

“And yet we're meant to be educating them for it.” What does this mean? [closed]

I was watching a TED video and didn’t get a few of the sentences. I hope someone can explain them to me. So I have a big interest in education, and I think we all do. We have a huge vested ...
11
votes
3answers
274 views

Inversion or fronting with “so”

Sentences such as: So says the preacher. So began the fight. Are they an example of inversion? I searched around, but all I could find was that the inversions with so can happen with only ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Conjunction And to express one idea

Please take a look at this sentence: There is a philosophical question and an issue of humanity "what are aliens?". In this one, I want to express "philosophical question"(a) and "issue of ...
1
vote
2answers
52 views

Please Help Me Punctuate This Sentence Correctly [closed]

I'm particularly interested in getting the punctuation correct, and I'd like to keep it all in one sentence. Thanks! Here's the sentence: It allows you to test on multiple browsers, and clicking ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Is it correct to say “unbinded”? [closed]

Let's say I have two objects that I want to bind together (just in abstract manner - matching abstract object). Now, let's say I have an object that is not bound to any other object. Can I say that ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Correlative Significance of “Whose” [closed]

Does "whose" correlate with a noun or a possesive determiner? For example: "Whose dog is that?" "That's Johnny's dog." This would imply that "whose" correlates with "Johnny's" or that "whose dog" ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

about the usage of “the” before a possession construction [duplicate]

There are examples I took from Murphy's English Grammar in Use, Unit 81B the Carters' house Mr and Mrs Carter's house I couldn't understand why the latter goes like that and not like "the Mr and ...
1
vote
1answer
17 views

“Select parent set of selected items to change to”…?

I am writing a program where each item has a "parent set" attribute. I am trying to create a function that changes the "parent set" value of selected items, and am having troubles trying to phrase ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Is “War needs heroes” grammatically correct? [closed]

It's intended to be used as a slogan of a war-type game. Should the subject be "war" or "a war" or "wars"? And what the verb form should be accordingly?
0
votes
3answers
243 views

“Did you get it” vs “Do you got it” [closed]

I understand that Got = Did + Get. So, we are saying "Did you get it?". I am expanding it again like this : Got = Did + Get = Did + (Do + Get). So, is it correct to ask "Do you got it?" I can ...
1
vote
3answers
118 views

Controvery over subject-verb agreement in this sentence

The sentence Women driving cars is, of course, such a foreign sight to a society like Saudi Arabia The subject is not "women" (otherwise, the verb would have been 'are'); the subject, as I ...
1
vote
2answers
64 views

Is saying “may have” incorrect?

I believe I've heard that might is the past tense of may. So you should say might have never may have.
-2
votes
1answer
51 views

Use of will in condition clauses [duplicate]

I've got following sentence in a visa application form: You are not required to provide a medical certificate or Chest X-ray Certificate if you will be in New Zealand for less than six months. ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Use of the word 'respectively' [duplicate]

I want to know if the following sentence is grammatically correct: "John's largest tomato and largest pumpkin outweighed Bill's by 2 and 17 pounds, respectively." I am trying to say "John's largest ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Using THE in Sentences [duplicate]

When there is a phrase like "the page of the book," is it correct to put both the in the sentence? What are the rules in general? What if we had more OF in the sentence? e.g. "the room of the ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Is there a common rule for punctuation or is it contextual?

The comma, with words like but or since- is it placed before or after these words? Is there a particular template to follow or is it contextual?
1
vote
0answers
27 views

Bust confusions? [closed]

I'm wondering if we can say 'bust confusions', as in the title 'Common Grammar Confusions Busted!' Thank you! Yatt
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Is “Dumb thing's broken” grammatically correct?

I'm studying English watching Big Hero 6. The movie script has a line "Dumb thing's broken." (Hiro's line) My question is that if it's grammatically correct. As far as I know, the noun 'thing' is ...
0
votes
2answers
44 views
2
votes
1answer
62 views

Using “will” after “when” referring to the future [closed]

I'm going to send an email to a professor. There is a sentence that I think may be wrong because I'm not sure about using will after when, even though it obviously refers to the future. But ...