This tag is about how the grammar works: different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
1answer
36 views

Would “Human Resources are excited or is excited” correct? [duplicate]

Would "Human Resources are excited or is excited" be correct?
0
votes
2answers
41 views

whether or not usage [closed]

Waiting for the answer whether or not configuration changes helped? I am struggling with the second part of the question. Does this sentence correct or i need to change it?
0
votes
4answers
68 views

Willingness to learn a language / “reactivate” school knowledge [closed]

In a job ad it says that one should be able to speak German and Polish and that one should be willing to learn French. I had French in school and now I want to express my willingness to learn French ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

Is it correct to use multiple adjectives that mean the same thing as one adjective?

I came across this quote from some popular guy who likes to use big words and I was wondering if it's correct. Their vacuous posturing, pharissaical sanctimonies and sadducceical homilies now ...
-5
votes
2answers
36 views

Does this grammatically make sense? [closed]

I make new videos on every other Fridays OR I make new videos every other Friday? And also is it right to say "No one would notice if i'd forgot to put blush on one side of my face?"
0
votes
0answers
24 views

How to pied-pipe “only in respect to which … by … rule”?

I'm trying to pied-pipe the last dependent clause for simplicity, following Prof Lawler's comment: ...but not to legislative facts that will produce adverse consequences to them [//] only in ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Can a past participle phrase be passive voice?

The man, although shown to be innocent, was persecuted. Would the participle "shown" in the sentence above constitute as passive voice? I thought that since the participle was in a participle ...
0
votes
1answer
127 views

Can “what” be plural? [duplicate]

I searched The Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA) for "what make you". 10 results were returned. Here are some of the results. GROSS: So what happens, in a way, is that this young star ...
-4
votes
1answer
46 views

Morphemes Need help really bad [closed]

I need help with some mutliple choice If the word glub means 'a silly remark' a possible verb meaning 'to say something silly' could be: a) glubber b)glubby c)glub d)glubberish e)glubbly
2
votes
5answers
258 views

would if faced with the same circumstances

I argue instead that politicians have in fact behaved rationally or at least no differently than their Western counterparts would if faced with the same circumstances. I understand the meaning of ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Nonetheless or nevertheless? [duplicate]

I have looked up the difference but I cannot decide which word to use. I am talking about my high school experience. "There was always something to be done, from [this] to [that]. ...
1
vote
2answers
115 views

Respect level languages in English [closed]

I would like to ask about respect level languages in English. I was taught to always use "would like to" instead of "want to" to express politeness and respect. However, I am not sure whether this ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

“To How” or “In How”?

I have the sentence: "Since that experience, I have made changes to how I address all of my courses." Should I use "to how" or "in how" for any grammatical reason(s), or is it simply a matter of ...
-1
votes
1answer
72 views

Is “You might could talk to her family” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Following up my previous questions on the usage of the word / phrase ('banzai' and 'ring the cherries') in Thomas Harris' thriller, ”The Silence of Lambs,” I came across the following passage in the ...
-1
votes
1answer
80 views

What parts of speech are in the sentence, “He went to the moon”?

What parts of speech are in this sentence: He went to the moon. I’m confused about part of speech to assign to “to the moon”.
1
vote
1answer
47 views

What is the difference between “into” and “in” when cutting something [duplicate]

How can I explain the logical meaning of the difference between into and in when cutting something. For example, 'Cut the peach into 3 pieces' vs 'Cut the peach in half' Thank you!
0
votes
2answers
47 views

Is “educate not exclude” grammatically correct?

The following is part of a Huffington Post article. There seems to be something missing between "to educate" and "not exclude" — or is this sentence correct? I believe the purpose of public ...
0
votes
2answers
44 views

How to deal with parallel structure where the plurality of the nouns changes?

This is the intent of what I want to get across: You are participating in a discussion with the moderators and as a moderator. I want to emphasize in particular that he is not only speaking with ...
1
vote
2answers
34 views

“which” with non-noun-phrase antecedent

I became a little unsure regarding to grammar while writing a sentence that, "... will either pass through the top-right or bottom-left corner, during which ...", in which case "which" has an implied ...
-2
votes
0answers
29 views

'Is there any + verb' vs 'Are there any + verb'? [duplicate]

What are the similarities and differences? I'd guess that because 'any' means 'at least one person', both are the same? Moreover, regarding each construct separately, must the verb be singular or ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

“Method proposed” vs “proposed method”

Should we write "Method proposed" or "Proposed method" for the title of a section in an article?
-1
votes
2answers
44 views

How to use “of which” to refer to a percentage

Please help me with the use "of which" in the below context: Original sentence: A and B caused the problem for 50% and 23% of the elderly people in England respectively. Rewrite (option 1): ...
2
votes
2answers
59 views

Verb or Adjective?

I read the following sentence in a grammar drill: I was disappointed. The ans key marks disappointed as adjective. I thought it to be a compound verb - was disappointed. Is that correct ?
11
votes
7answers
1k views

What part of speech is “telling” in “that would be telling”?

In the phrase "that would be telling", what is the word "telling"? I think it would be either an adjective or a verb, but which is it? Neither seems to be obviously wrong. I think the former would ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Correct question form with “supposed to”? [closed]

I am wondering is following question correct: Is it what was supposed to be done here? Thanks in advance.
1
vote
1answer
34 views

Is “Don't just talk to your audience, play with them” correct ?

I am about to print out some business cards and I was wondering if Don't just talk to your audience, play with them is correct. I understand that as "audience" is singular, it should be Don't ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Parts of Speech and Grammar Point for -ing

Can someone help me to explain the two following structures — identifying parts of speech, and in particular why we’re using the -ing form of have in the first? How about having lunch? Why don't we ...
-2
votes
3answers
46 views

Should there be an apostrophe? [closed]

Should there be an apostrophe after transfers in the sentence below. "Once the Form A Freehold Transfers have been returned to our office."
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Adding an 's' to day [duplicate]

Should it be 30 day free trial or 30 days free trial? I believe it should be 30 day free trial but I can't find the grammar rule to back this up. I am trying to explain it to someone who is not a ...
2
votes
2answers
83 views

“Have got” used with “since”

Is it correct to say: I have got a bank account since I was 18? I think that it is wrong because since implies something that has happened in the past and is still happening, while got is ...
-1
votes
0answers
34 views

Yet so far hath discretion fought with nature [on hold]

Here's from Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 2 Yet so far hath discretion fought with nature That we with wisest sorrow think on him, Together with remembrance of ourselves. I'm wondering about ...
0
votes
3answers
102 views

Each question carries 0.5 marks vs Each question carries 0.5 mark [duplicate]

Which one is right and why? Does the answer change if instead of 0.5 we have let say 5.
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Do these mean the same: “your friends, boss” .vs. “your friends, your boss”?

Do these have the same meaning? And are they both grammatically correct? your friends, your lover, your boss, your dog. your friends, lover, boss, dog. I don't want to put "your" after ...
0
votes
2answers
99 views

“Matt was phoning while we were having dinner”

I'm self-studying now and I've found an exercise. Matt ... while we were having dinner. The correct answer is phoned. But I couldn't figure out why was phoning is not a right choice. There is ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Historicist critics incline

Historicist critics are inclined, even now, towards the explanation that Melville is Bartleby himself. Could you please explain to me why there is passive voice used in the sentence above? Can I ...
2
votes
1answer
107 views

Are there any universal rules in appropriating “_an,” “_sh,” “_es,” “_ch” for the demonyms of countries? [duplicate]

Suffixes indicating people and language of country vary by country: _an: American, German, Italian, Belgian, Australian, Russian, Ukrainian, Korean, Mexican, Brazilian, Chilean, Argentinean, ...
0
votes
3answers
63 views

Contraction [SUBJECT] + is with proper noun ending in s?

The possessive form (the car of Jesus) would be Jesus' car. If we say Jesus is 11. Would it also be Jesus' 11? Jesus's 11?
0
votes
0answers
5 views

Which is the correct grammar for the following phrase? [migrated]

I ask you consider I ask that you consider I ask you to consider Which is correct?
1
vote
0answers
15 views

How the verb becomes a gerund after “to”, e.g. “committed to helping you” [duplicate]

When we say I am looking forward to seeing you. instead of I am looking forward to see you. is the word "to" a preposition, attached to the verb as one word?
-1
votes
1answer
38 views

“We propose the session focuses on …” or “We propose the session focus on …” Which is correct? [duplicate]

I understand a verb in English needs to match the sentence subject. Is the subject here "we" or "session", or am I seeing this incorrectly?
-1
votes
1answer
46 views

Exceptions of Parallelism

Ok, it all starts with this we learned back in our elementary school that is called parallelism. What it basically says is that you can't compare a thing to a person and vice versa. But here is ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Single quotation marks: punctuation marks outside or inside? [duplicate]

I use single quotation marks to provide translations of foreign terms and to highlight titles of parts of my dissertation. I'm confused where I should put commas and periods when they appear next to ...
-1
votes
1answer
44 views

Can a kangaroo jump higher than/above the building?

A building cannot jump. We generally use "higher" to campare with something that can jump. But, can we use "higher" in this context? It comes from the following joke - Q. Can a kangaroo jump higher ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Best English grammar book [duplicate]

First of all sorry for not asking a technical question. Actually I need to know the best English grammar book in terms of completeness and depth of every topic. Any help would be appreciated.
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Apple's advertising slogan [duplicate]

Apple has an amazing marketing/advertisement team. Their ads and presentations are always amazing. In 1997, they had an iconic "Think Different" campaign for their new slogan. Within commercials they ...
0
votes
1answer
184 views

have been + V ing vs have been + V ed

I know that Present Perfect Progressive is have been + ing. I've been learning since 9 o'clock; But which tense is have been V + ed ?
1
vote
0answers
61 views

Is there any differences between “I suggest doing” and “I suggest you do?” [duplicate]

I know that both "I suggest doing this" and "I suggest you do this" are grammatically correct. But I wonder if they have same meaning or there are subtle difference between them.
0
votes
1answer
24 views

If I hyphenate first-order conditions should I also hyphenate higher-order conditions?

It seems to me that the hyphens in "first-order conditions" and "second-order conditions" are correct, but I'm editing an article that also mentions "higher-order conditions" and "lower-order ...
5
votes
2answers
109 views

sound and noise from across a wall dividing two rooms [closed]

What is the word used to describe the disturbing sound/noise hear across an adjacent wall where a couple are engaging in sexual intercourse?
2
votes
3answers
179 views

How to use “The first thing I did was”? [closed]

I'm unable to figure out if the following sentence is correct: "After I watched the movie, the first thing I did was shutdown the laptop and go outside" Is this grammatically correct? Or should it ...