This tag is for questions about how grammar works, e.g. different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean. For questions that ask whether something is grammatical, please use the "grammaticality" tag instead.

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Consist or Consist of [closed]

I came across a sentence which is: "The editorial panel should not consist of more than 3 members." But I'm confused that should it be 'consist' or 'consist of'.
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0answers
33 views

What is the difference between 'avoided with the use of' or 'by the use of'?

I am reading a text that refers to a ship accident that caused serious damage to the environment and was partly due to lack of knowledge of maritime English. The related sentence included this ...
2
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1answer
47 views

Why is “that” preceded by a comma in this relative clause? What does it mean?

As you know, there are two types of relative clause: Type 1 The woman who lives next door is a doctor. In this example,the relative clause tells us which person or thing (or what kind of ...
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2answers
60 views

Need help identifying epistrophe

I have a small presentation on epistrophe coming up and I want to make sure I don't say anything incorrect. Would the sentence "Ever since I left the city you, you, you" (it's from the song "Hotline ...
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1answer
34 views

the time tense (had now been detected)

Thank so much for your help. I found the following sentence in a newspaper this morning: "The virus had now been detected in 23 countries in the Americas," she added. Is the sentence's verb ...
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4answers
108 views

“It is better to X than to Y” - the structure of a difficult comparative sentence

Take the following sentence: It is better to underestimate your abilities and overestimate your risks than to go in a direction that actually involves more uncertainty than you can justify. For ...
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2answers
38 views

In/after hours. What preposition to use? [duplicate]

In/after 3 hours I will go to work. I will have to go to work after 3 hours from now.
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2answers
39 views

with you or to you [closed]

Do the prepositions have different meanings? I don't exactly know their meanings. Let me know the meanings if you have the time. Please help me.
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2answers
40 views

Use of “as” with verbs? [closed]

Would you say: I don't know anybody who has as much energy as John. or I don't know anybody who has as much energy as John does.
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2answers
34 views

Is this sentence “I barraged him with an interview” grammatically correct?

"I barraged him with an interview." The above sentence sounds wrong to me. I feel like you should barrage someone with either a plural (such as "I barraged him with questions.") or one of those ...
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2answers
34 views

which pronoun do I use here, “he” or “him”?

I had a question about possession. I wrote the sentence: He may need to stay for a while, therefore I’ll listen to any concerns you or him may have.” Is it him or he? Because it sounds natural ...
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2answers
63 views

Difference in meaning of ' Old habits die hard.' Vs 'Old habits hardly die.' [closed]

What is the difference in the meaning of these two sentences Old habits die hard. Old habits hardly die. Are they both grammatically correct? According to me, the first statement says that it is ...
2
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1answer
54 views

Double possessive: a friend of Steven's

I am wondering about the "double possessive" I have been reading about. I have a couple of sentences as an example: He’s a new client of Jane and Kevin’s and a close childhood friend of Steven ...
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0answers
43 views

Whomever or Whoever?

In the following sentence, should I use WHOMEVER or WHOEVER? I don’t want whomever it is to see that I’m a woman alone. Or should it be: I don’t want whoever it is to see that I’m a woman alone. ...
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0answers
20 views

punctuating Did you wonder [migrated]

Would this have a question mark? (This is a lead sentence) Did you ever wonder how thunderstorms are formed or what happens during a thunderstorm.
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2answers
40 views

What do we mean by the phrase 'conventions of standard written English' [closed]

A question came and it had one of its options: correct according to conventions of standard English. I don't remember the question but the question was from a grammar section. I do not have an idea ...
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0answers
2 views

When to use 'For' and 'Of' [migrated]

Are there certain situations where 'for' and 'of' may be used interchangeably and yet still 'sound' grammatically correct? Take this for example: With regard to the tribe of (or for) the men that ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

If he did or if he had

Consider the following excerpt: He couldn't follow. Just couldn't. Because if he had, he would have been [...] As a non-native speaker, I am unsure about whether to use either did or had to ...
9
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3answers
351 views

Does “They don't have a life” sound correct?

As he and I walked past a group of individuals, my rude friend said, "They don't have a life." I hadn't heard the expression before that. Does it make sense? They were individuals (plural) but he ...
2
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5answers
64 views

Can an adverb be a predicate?

Consider the following quote, I have checked that "once" is an adverb. How can it become a predicate?
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2answers
73 views

Should I say “who want” or “who wants”? [closed]

I'm french and I need your help for one little thing. I'm about to write a status on Facebook for some users of my app (most of them talk english) and I am wondering if I should say : Who want to ...
0
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1answer
40 views

Is the comma between “question” and “so” needed? If so, why?

I have come across this problem numerous times. I am unsure of why a comma is needed in phrases such as the one below — between the words "question" and "so." Our goal is to have the best answers to ...
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2answers
94 views

Is “I will sleep you to bed” grammatically correct? [closed]

Like we use "I will walk the dog to the park", is using "I will sleep you to bed" grammatically correct?
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1answer
48 views

Simple Present vs Simple Future

This is my first grammar-related post in this forum. It's my honour to be associated with professional native English teachers. My question is based on the nuanced difference between Simple Present ...
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1answer
30 views

Grammar - finished or had finished? [duplicate]

Are these two sentences same? With the exception of Rob and me, everyone in the class finished the assignment before the teacher came. With the exception of Rob and me, everyone in the ...
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1answer
32 views

Usage of “suppose”?

What is correct/wrong? So far we supposed that it is on you to check whether to send dunning letters by E-Mail or by mail. or: So far we've supposed that it is on you to check whether to send ...
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0answers
7 views

The Second Conditional [migrated]

If I saw him yesterday,I'd talk to him. How should I understand the meaning of this sentence? As I understand this meaning should refer to unreal situation.
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1answer
49 views

Ambiguity with appearance as plural or singular [duplicate]

It is more common to write: "People care too much about their appearance." This is because it is being used as a "non count" noun and the plural could confuse people into thinking the writer means the ...
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0answers
33 views

I was asked if I …? [duplicate]

It seems to be a matter of opinion whether If I was a sailor, (seven oceans I'd sail to her) is correct or "were" must be used, but if you consider it to be wrong, would I was asked if I ...
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0answers
39 views

have difficulty in understanding usage of being [migrated]

I have recently encountered some sentences relating to being while reading some books. However, the sentences don't make a sense for me because I can't understand them. Could you explain me the ...
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votes
0answers
31 views

Connect three sentences and make a shorter sentence [migrated]

Suppose three sentences: 1- I have eaten lunch. 2- I have slept. 3- I have come here. Is it right to say: 'I have eaten lunch, slept and come here.'? What about 'I have eaten lunch, have slept ...
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1answer
51 views

Using the idiom “peace of mind”

Which usage is more appropriate, or are they equal? It afforded me the luxury of travelling and the peace of mind in knowing that I could work anywhere. It afforded me the luxury of travelling and ...
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0answers
30 views

Nowhere near and nowhere close to

I am so confused about which is modifying which. In the sentence below: It was nowhere close to being done. Nowhere: An adverb modifying close It's the farthest I could get. I don't know if ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Articles before percentages earned?

When writing about grades, does the percentage need an article? "Jenny earned an 87% in the AP Psychology course." Or just "Jenny earned 87% in the AP Psychology course." My thinking is, you would use ...
0
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2answers
67 views

Should I use who or whom? [duplicate]

This is part of my sentence (for an essay): "For example, Kate- the Governor's sister, who/whom was later executed-...." Should I use who or whom in this situation?
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1answer
41 views

When I am quoting something does it need to be incorporated into my own sentence? (Also, should I use an ellipsis?)

I am writing an essay for my English class. At one point I make a statement about the book and end the sentence. Afterwards I've inserted a direct quote from the book on its own. Here's an example: ...
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1answer
44 views

Rules before we were born [closed]

The creators of English grammar created the rules for English before I was born. Has those rules been updated to cover todays writers? English 1
1
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1answer
68 views

What are the levels of proficiency in english and the vocubulary subsets at each level [closed]

What are the levels of proficiency in english and the vocubulary subsets at each level. As in how many words should a person know at each level of english proficiency and is there a reference list of ...
-1
votes
1answer
72 views

The Who/Whom examples in Strunk and White's Elements of Grammar [duplicate]

From Strunk & White, Elements of Grammar, 3rd Ed., p.11: "When who introduces a subordinate clause, its case depends on its function in that clause." They then give four examples without ...
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0answers
77 views

Is “sing” a noun or a verb in this quote by Samuel Beckett? [migrated]

"When you are up to your neck in shit, all you can do is sing." Samuel Beckett I just checked some credible online dictionaries like Longman, Macmillan and American Heritage and they all had "sing" ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

What is the meaning, form and pronunciation for the items listed in bold? [closed]

Tide laundry detergent is meant to be used for household cleaning purposes, but thieves are turning it into something dirty. Authorities are reporting a spike in thefts of Tide, and in some cities ...
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0answers
18 views

Aptitude for or in

Aptitude in carrying out the qualitative analysis of financial parameters of companies’ performances has also paved my path. Do I use "in" or "for" with aptitude? I am a little confused about the ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Is it “give a credit for” or “give credit for”?

My first language does not have articles, and I am really struggling to understand why people sometimes use them and sometimes do not. I understand general rule that "the" means one specific thing and ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

is “on it” must be there in this sentence?

I have seen the following sentence in a book: ..., but the branch with the eight apples on it was in his hand when I first saw him. My question is, is "on it" a necessary part from this sentence? ...
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0answers
43 views

'Neither' and 'Nor' Usage

What would be the correct sentence? Neither does he abuse nor does he beat. or Neither does he abuse nor he beats.
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0answers
4 views

Which is grammatically correct “I no longer think that.” or “I no longer thought that.”? [migrated]

IF you want to know the context below is the excerpt "I used to think romantic love was a neurosis shared by two, a supreme foolishness. I no longer thought that. There's nothing foolish in loving ...
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0answers
73 views

The sentence from a Hotel Transylvania

What is the structure of the sentence: "that's asking a lot?" Is it passive or not?I mean, if the meaning is passive, can't if be a passival in present continuous?
2
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1answer
58 views

“It's as same watch as the one I lost.” - What is wrong with the sentence?

Are the following sentences grammatically correct? If not, what's wrong with them? It's as same watch as the one I lost. It's the same watch as I lost.
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0answers
38 views

Can the Personal Pronoun I Be Put in the Nominative Case before the Gerund?

In the recently published Report on the Death of Alexander Litvinenko by Sir Robert Owen there is the following sentence in the statement of one of the witnesses (Boris Berezovsky): "This resulted in ...
0
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1answer
56 views

Comma before adverbial participial phrases (reduced adverbial phrases) and participial prepositions

Another tricky comma question that has recently popped up in my line work that I have not been able to resolve to my satisfaction. Apologies it's a bit long, but all parts are related and additional ...