Tagged Questions

This tag is about how the grammar works: different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean.

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0
votes
0answers
25 views

Complex usage of “nor” and explanation

I'm positive this is an acceptable usage of "nor," but I can't find a rule that explains the usage. Please help! He was too tired to walk to the next open crossing. Nor to start an argument.
2
votes
2answers
77 views

Grammatical Reasoning?

This is clearly an ungrammatical sentence: "Freddy would like to see the home-opener, but tickets are unable to be purchased by him." An obvious correction would be: "Freddy would like to see the ...
-1
votes
1answer
48 views

is “click to image to enlarge” correct ? [closed]

I saw this sentence in a English website. Is “click to image” correct?I think it should be “click image to enlarge”
0
votes
2answers
93 views

“is no longer working” vs “does not work anymore”

Mr.John does not work in plaza hotel, anymore vs Mr.John is no longer working at plaza hotel Which one is correct to say? If he's not working, currently.
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Induction on vs with respect to [closed]

Is there any reason why mathematicians say "I will prove by induction on n that" rather than "I will prove by induction with respect to n that"?
0
votes
2answers
44 views

“The + noun + of” construction meaning specific instances

Help me, please, with the next question. There is a book "The rules of management". Does the construction in the title says to us that in the book are all the rules of management (that I can't ...
0
votes
5answers
62 views

Use of subjunctive in English (and other languages alike) [closed]

I first learned about the subjunctive mood in my Spanish class. The main purpose of subjunctive is to express doubt and uncertainty, what I learned in class. I have posted about subjunctive in ...
0
votes
2answers
33 views

Uses of Reflexive pronoun [duplicate]

We use reflexive pronoun after some verbs like *avail ourself, acquitted himself, absented themselves * etc and some time we have to avoid from reflexive pronoun after some verbs like break, burst, ...
2
votes
3answers
85 views

Does the phrase “espoused narrative” make sense?

Recently I've been told my usage of this term is incorrect, but I've seen it being used often enough. Context I've pulled from google "This may well also allow the EU to illegitimate these ...
-1
votes
1answer
113 views

Confusion about “very” and “very much”

I have few confusions regarding the usage of very and very much. 1. From OALD I found this usage guide - It states that very can be used with past participles used as adjectives, but not with ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

use of I and me at the beginning of a sentence [duplicate]

Which one is correct: I and my father are going to the market. Me and my father are going to the market.
0
votes
2answers
63 views

Why is it called zero conditional?

What's the meaning of the zero conditional or the first or the second .. Does it mean the form of the verb and what does that exactly mean does it mean infinitive although the present simple is used! ...
6
votes
2answers
390 views

Odd British pluperfect subjunctive construction?

I read this sentence in the Guardian today, and I couldn't figure out if it was an error or a regionalism. (I did, however, figure out that I don't know my grammar too well!) [the mid-18th ...
2
votes
4answers
79 views

Future Seen from the Past

What is difference between these two sentences: They left at 6 a.m. and would reach London after four hours. They left at 6 a.m. and reached London after four hours. The book, Oxford ...
0
votes
0answers
6 views

Is A Expression like “How long does this letter take to arrive at London” unnatural? [migrated]

(Excuse for my broken English) I am Japanese student studying in English. Other day, my classmate was asked to translate above sentense into English by the teacher. この手紙がロンドンに着くまで、どのくらい時間がかかりますか? ...
0
votes
2answers
67 views

Choice of tense to describe continuing status of an object

Hi I am so confused by the English tenses when I try to describe, for example a status change, something happened in the past, just at a point in time, but is still true until now. Please list those ...
-1
votes
2answers
66 views

Using the word “whether” instead of “which”

Can I use the word "whether" instead of "which" as in the following sentence? "How to Decide Whether to Use Product A or Product B" (this is a heading) I would usually write it as "How to Decide ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

“I'm sure this would not have happen” vs. “I'm not sure this didn't happen”

I was asked what's wrong with this sentence: I'm not sure this didn't happen. I didn't think it was incorrect, but my friend said I was. So, is the sentence correct either way, or is one correct and ...
-1
votes
1answer
20 views

Is this grammatical “one of them say~”? [duplicate]

I was listening to BBC while reading the script and the announcer said... "Then I heard one of them say his parents were dinosaurs" Is that correct? I don't think so.
0
votes
1answer
42 views

How to express relation that something belong to something, using noun phrase?

I want to express the belong relation between things, but not use of or 's such as "path of file" or "file's path". In coding, there is sometimes a need to express "belong" relation in an identifier ...
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Which proforms have “Tom” as antecedent in “When Tom won, his friends cheered for him” [migrated]

When Tom won the talent contest, his friends cheered for him. In this sentence, what is the pronoun that matches the antecedent Tom? I suspect it is "him", but can it also be "his" in this case? ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Is a value something to “indicate” the valued thing?

Sorry for the confusing title. I came across the below sentence, and am wondering if the word "indicate" collocates with the word "value" as in this case: The PCS (Print Contrast Signal) is a value ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

“Him” or “his” used with “resulted” [duplicate]

Which sentence is more grammatically correct: Jack’s predilection toward competitive sports resulted in him becoming a great tennis player. or Jack's predilection toward competitive sports ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Part of Speech, adverb or adjective?

"There ain't no tellin'," sobbed Nancy. "She lay back that white an' still she might easy be dead; but Miss Polly said she wa'n't dead--an' Miss Polly had oughter know, if any one would--she kept up ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

To-infinitive usage: which sentence is correct? [duplicate]

which one of the following sentences is correct and why? Her face was intentionally blurred in the photo to not to reveal her identity? Her face was intentionally blurred in the photo not to reveal ...
0
votes
0answers
52 views

Far more … than meaning

Theft of an idea is far more difficult for proving in court than word-for-word plagiarism. Can far more be used in that sentence? What does it mean?
0
votes
1answer
75 views

Very great or great? [duplicate]

Is it correct to say 'a very great refrigerator'. Isn't just 'a great refrigerator' enough? Should we use 'very' before 'great' as in a very great man, or is it 'a great man'. Why? Thanks. sundaresh
0
votes
0answers
30 views

What is wrong with these sentences? [duplicate]

I am new in this site : I faced problem to understand what is wrong with these sentences : (i) One must do what he thinks best. (ii) Can I leave the room now, Sir? I don't understand why first one ...
1
vote
3answers
42 views

How to parallel “A be B” and “A do C”

From Barron's 6 ACT Practice Tests: The books are either explicit, describe graphic violence, or use questionable language. Is this grammatically correct? If not, is there any way to parallel "A ...
2
votes
2answers
74 views

Is “apropos” commonly used in everyday life? [closed]

Would I be understood, if I used apropos in my speech for typical New Yorker?
-2
votes
2answers
49 views

How to remember the terms for noun declensions?

I'm aware of the etymological fallacy, but would knowing the etymology of the following words help me understand them? I'm always confused as to which is which, and I need to consult a dictionary ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Usage of I and Myself [duplicate]

Mail : "Who will be doing the validation?" Reply : "Myself and Sarah will be doing validation" I believe the usage of myself is incorrect here. It should be "Sarah and I will be doing validation". ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Difference between agenda and schedule

I am not a native speaker. A business friend will be in town soon, and I am trying to draft a file to schedule his trip. He will have a lot of meetings in town and then he need to travel in several ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

does a semicolon or comma belong before “is this correct?”

You went to the store and bought chips, is that correct? You went to the store and bought chips; is that correct? You bought a bag of chips, correct? You bought a bag of chips; correct? Thanks for ...
0
votes
2answers
22 views

“statistical hypothesis testing”

Can I put "do" in front of "statistical hypothesis testing"? Thanks. To address the management of any high risk aspects of the proposed work, we will do statistical hypothesis testing to decide on a ...
1
vote
3answers
98 views

“become a President” or “become President”

If he had not been a film star, he would not have become President. In my opinion, "a President" is correct. Examples: "My dream is to be a teacher" "My dream is to be a President" ...
0
votes
5answers
65 views

Does “I wouldn't do this, if it wasn't compulsory” sound natural? [closed]

Would the above sentence sound natural? If not, what would be the modification?
2
votes
2answers
41 views

Why can we omit a phrase that ends up changing the meaning of the preceding statement

I'm certain my terminology is wrong. Sorry in advance. I'm working with a student trying to understand a tutorial on 3D modeling written in English. The student is Japanese. The translation is not ...
0
votes
1answer
88 views

“Despite not being” vs “despite of not being” [closed]

What's the different between despite not being and despite of not being? Example: She wore a turtleneck sweater and a floral skirt that reached just above her knee. Despite (of) not being ...
-1
votes
1answer
35 views

Use of “one of” with “and” and “or.”

Is either of the following is proper? Are you related to one of George or Mike? Are you related to one of George and Mike? I'd like to ask a yes-or-no question to determine whether you are related ...
1
vote
5answers
629 views

Is “I always found their sight relaxing” grammatical?

I ask because the sentence returns 0 results in Google. I'm a little confused. Is the sentence grammatical? If not, what's the correct alternative? Here's an example of the sentence in a context: ...
-2
votes
0answers
27 views

Past simple and Simple past

We can say both. Why ? "Simple past" seems to be the grammatically correct one (adjective first) but "Past simple" is the one we do use... Is there a reason ?
6
votes
3answers
510 views

Rose “to a crescendo” or “in a crescendo”?

What is the correct way of saying that the song grew louder gradually? His song rose in a crescendo His song rose to a crescendo.
0
votes
0answers
5 views

Past tense vs present tense [migrated]

I have a question about tenses in writing. I’m writing a short story. I am using the past tense, but I have sections where I describe people and places that are supposed to still be in existence. ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

the verb 'declare' without a person who declares

Someone declares that the changes are aimed at combating untimeliness and incompleteness in [name of tax] tax assessment and withholding by tax agents. How would you express the said idea without ...
-1
votes
1answer
21 views

Comma-use and possibly other errors in text [closed]

Are their any error the text below? Other requirements: Fluent English speaker Excellent, near perfect grammar Is the comma-use correct?
0
votes
0answers
23 views

usage of “name” as transitive verb [migrated]

I was having a look on usage of name as verb here. I could understand the meaning of following correct usages. He named his dog Shandy. He could not name his attacker. Name a pet animal. I want to ...
3
votes
4answers
521 views

Is there a generic word for “all of x type of thing”?

I am looking for a generic collective noun that can be acceptably used to refer to all existing things of some particular kind. It would apply to "all existing trees", "all existing vehicles", "all ...
1
vote
0answers
54 views

Can I Get Any Critiques For this? [closed]

I'm fifteen, and I'm writing a novel. On many websites, almost everyone says that you can't write up to perfection as a teen, and I know it's true. Because whenever I compare my writing to the works ...
2
votes
3answers
81 views

order of adjectives - deleted recent questions vs recent deleted questions

From what is introduced here, "recent" is a kind of age and "deleted" seems to be a kind of specific opinion, so this structure seems to be correct: "deleted recent questions". Actually I was ...