This tag is for questions about how grammar works, e.g. different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean. For questions that ask whether something is grammatical, please use the "grammaticality" tag instead.

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23 views

“Does my dividend increase over years?” or “Is my dividend increase over years?” [migrated]

I was wondering, which sentence is more accurate? Or, both are acceptable? Does my dividend increase over years? Or Is my dividend increase over years?
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2answers
47 views

Simple past tense vs. perfect past tense [duplicate]

What are the difference between the following sentence? I ate apples. I have eaten apples. When should we use simple past tense? When should we use perfect past tense?
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1answer
74 views

Can “broken foots” be used instead of “broken feet”? (U.S.)

I recently read a sports article that stated: The bad news is that Watkins might be the team's most dynamic playmaker and broken foots can be complicated. My immediate reaction is it should be ...
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1answer
22 views

Proper use of a pronoun [closed]

is i proper to say: we look forward to seeing you, X and Y? or or looking forward to seeing X, Y and you.
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2answers
44 views

“Earthquake measuring” vs “Earthquake measured”

"An earthquake measuring 5.0 on the Richter scale jolted Sikkim on Thursday, Regional Seismological Centre sources said." I don't know why this sentence isn't wrong. It should be: "An ...
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3answers
58 views

Sentence parallelism

Is the following sentence parallel? Globalization causes international goods to be available in different countries, better cultural change, and international trade to be more efficient.
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1answer
27 views

Answering a letter Help with advice [closed]

I received a letter I'd like to start my answer with the following sentence: I am writing this email because you have sent me an email in which you tell me a really complex dilemma. Is that right?
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0answers
20 views

What transitive verbs can act intransitively

How can we judge a transitive verb to be used correctly when it's in intransitive form in a sentence? For example, are these uses of transitive verbs correct? I drink. He answered. They will give.
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0answers
43 views

Adverb at the end of a sentence

Is the "in them" in this sentence necessary? Globalization is an aggregation of international processes that benefit the countries that participate in them.
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0answers
18 views

Help on Systemic Functional Grammar

The question is on the types of reference. G is for generic, I indefinite and D definite. My friends and I have been arguing over #1 and #4. Could someone help? Many thanks. "Identify the types of ...
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1answer
30 views

We the saw the arguments and attacks waged against her grow ever more offensive

I have just spotted this text on Huffington Post [1] and it sounded a little bit strange for me, a Brazilian ESL student. Can somebody clarify to me why the journalist selected the words We the saw ...
0
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1answer
28 views

Use participle or “which” to start a nonessential clause?

Is there anything wrong with this sentence: The city pays landlords more than someone with a rental voucher can pay, which only exacerbates NY's already severe housing shortage. Is this sentence ...
3
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1answer
66 views

Is it correct to avoid starting sentences with subordinating conjunctions in technical writing?

I work on a team where everyone has decided that it is incorrect to start a sentence with a subordinating conjunction period. For example they will change the sentence: Based on the system-wide risk ...
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0answers
32 views

Impersonal / personal passive

Just need some clarification on this sentence.. We know that customs officials confiscated ten foreign passports last week. Ten foreign passports are known to have been confiscated last week ...
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3answers
681 views

“There is to be no drinking beer today” What is the status of “no” and “beer” here?

There's no doubting her sincerity. There's no telling what she's done. There's no guessing which way they'll bolt. There's to be no drinking beer today. There's no telling her. The word no is ...
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0answers
15 views

The usage of can or will in a sentence [closed]

Kindly help with this sentence. Forgive so that your prayers can be answered or Forgive so that your prayers will be answered
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3answers
37 views

Infinitive verses present participle

I often come across this type of thing and wondered if anyone could tell me the correct usage. I have a sentence that reads "As you go through various settings, you will have the option to allow ...
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0answers
27 views

Product description (text) in English, need some help [closed]

I have a product to launch, I've written a short description of about 600 words, I need some help to improve content quality, you know guys I am not very English :p I would like to make it more ...
0
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1answer
54 views

stative verbs as gerunds [duplicate]

If "ing" suffix is not used in stative verbs then why we are using "ing" suffix stative verbs in gerunds. For example: loving,believing,knowing,hating, etc etc., in these verbs why we using "ing"?
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0answers
23 views

some nothing kind of thing

"So, this friend of yours, what's he doing now?" "I have no idea. Something happened, some nothing kind of thing." How are we to understand the grammar for the phrase "some nothing kind of thing"? Is ...
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0answers
12 views

Is this sound correct “have been proven correct per se”

The full context "The saying has been proven correct per se." to describe a proverb or a saying is right about someone or something. Is is grammatically sound?
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0answers
25 views

'as good asymptotically as' or 'asymptotically as good as'?

In terms of grammar, should I say 'The error bound of AA is as good asymptotically as that of BB' OR 'The error bound of AA is asymptotically as good as that of BB' ? Or both are correct?
0
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2answers
59 views

Which is correct? She said it was more beautiful, didn't she or wasn't it?

She said it was more beautiful, didn't she? She said it was more beautiful, wasn't it? This sentence confused me. Usually we use the tag with the main verb, so "didn't she" is correct, but there ...
0
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0answers
26 views

What's the difference between regard, regards and regarding [closed]

i.e Regarding to your previous inquiry. Sometimes people use the word regard and regards, which one is correct?
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2answers
68 views

What our students have to say. Grammar question

I often hear the phrase "what our students have to say" in testimonials, and I am confused with the grammar here. It can be taken in two ways as follows. 1) Our students have something (what) to say ...
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2answers
35 views

Comma rules - found a lot of special rules, but not general ones

I have read a lot on proper punctuation: grammar.ccc.comnet.edu grammarbook.com And some more... Now I remember my English teacher warning me that in English, you should use a lot less commas then in ...
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0answers
23 views

Usage of the word “as”

Is it okay to use a single "as" in a sentence? "Before, the government would always intervene. Now, it isn't as involved." Or should I say: "In the past, the government would always intervene. Now, ...
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1answer
32 views

On a theoretical platform

Please tell me what is meant by the bold part On a theoretical platform of shared historiography, the regions in Indian history acquire a new significance in the 750-1200 period. ...
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1answer
26 views

Omitting the word “for”

Is there a difference in meaning between these two? Services must be paid. Services must be paid for.
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3answers
57 views

Placement of “only” word in the sentence [duplicate]

I read a text where kids share their experiences about activities in a language camp, and I came across this sentence: And we spoke only English. I feel that something is wrong with this sentence, ...
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0answers
44 views

Can “must” be used in this specific situation? [migrated]

Is this sentence grammatically correct: I MUST go to a party Consider this sentence as a sentence that is out of context. If it's not proper, when it would be? What sentence it should then be ...
1
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2answers
57 views

Usage of “instead of” [closed]

Do these sentences use instead of properly? He cycles to school instead of drive. He cycles to school instead of driving. CDO gives the example I wish you'd spend more time at home ...
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0answers
24 views

Quick questions about pronouns in a sentence [migrated]

I'm confused when it comes to writing the following: "..., I bought from my one of the sweet sweet friends" vs "...., I bought from one of my sweet sweet friends" Neither me or my partner is native ...
0
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1answer
45 views

Is it good to start a sentence with 'And'? [duplicate]

In my impression, this is very very common in the bible. But how about scientific writing?
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0answers
30 views

How to say past and present in a sentence?

Is this correct grammer - This picture is of me and my son, 3 months old but 30 years apart. I'd appreciate other sentence formations with same meaning.
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0answers
30 views

I have a question for this sentence.

Look at this sentence pz. The medical writer, Thomas McKeown, showed that most of the fatal diseases of the 19th century ________________ before the arrive of antibiotics or immunization programmes. ...
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2answers
48 views

had vs. had had

What are the different meanings of the following sentences? I had had too many chocolates, so I was too full to eat dinner yesterday. I had too many chocolates, so I was too full to eat dinner ...
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0answers
14 views

“had” use in past perfect tense [duplicate]

I called her, but she had already left for the day. I was taught that past perfect tense is used to describe an action before another action in the past. However, look at the following setntece: ...
1
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1answer
21 views

They have been vs. they will have been

What are the different meaning int the following sentences? They have been dating for a year now. They will have been dating for a year now.
1
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1answer
70 views

Speaker Paul Ryan said “encouraged with” but media is saying “Ryan encouraged by”. Why?

*Note: The first half of this question, in bold, is streamlined and expresses the gist of my message. You can skip the second half of the question if you would rather not slog through all my ...
-1
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2answers
26 views

First conditional or second conditional

For example: One of my friends is a compulsive gambler. Can I say "if you could stop going to the casino you wouldn't be so broke now " or do I need to change the whole sentence to simple present ...
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0answers
57 views

Diagramming simple wh- “to be” sentences

I have read a syntax book cover to cover and it seems to stubbornly avoid diagramming sentences with "to be" (or other auxilliary verbs) functioning as the principal verb. For example: That dog is ...
0
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2answers
32 views

On the use of the word 'account'

I came across an essay instruction written by a grammar school teacher writing 'Write an essay in which you account for the opinions ...' Shouldn't it be '... in which you MAKE AN ACCOUNT for the ...
2
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2answers
52 views

I don't want no robot running the empire

This construction and its variants always sound strange to me. If I was asked to write a sentence with the same meaning, my choice would be: I don't want a robot running the empire. Logically, ...
0
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1answer
27 views

We are pleased vs We were pleased to inform you [closed]

For college admission letters, I observed that "We are pleased to inform you...." rather than "We were pleased to inform you..." Why is it so?
1
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2answers
77 views

I sent … vs. I have sent … vs. I had sent you an email already [closed]

Which of the following sentences are correct? If all of them are correct, what are their different meanings? I sent you an email already. I have sent you an email already. I had sent you an email ...
2
votes
2answers
48 views

For someone having taught themself [closed]

Please look at the following sentence and tell me which sentence is correct? 1) "I play viola well for someone having taught themselves" and 2) "I play viola well for someone having taught ...
2
votes
1answer
20 views

in pursuit of / through a pursuit of

Do those expressions have some different nuance and grammatically correct? I have seen "in pursuit of" many times but rarely seen "through a pursuit of" which one would be more proper for the ...
0
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1answer
25 views

the proper spot of comma in a sentence

sample: Humanity has made important discoveries(,) thanks to the development of science and technology, and yet we do not know what exists in the deepest parts of the sea and the universe. I feel ...
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0answers
12 views

whether I would use “of” or not in this sentence [migrated]

sample : The efforts of discovering new sea routes resulted in the creation (of) new maps, as well I feel like I need to put "of" in between "creation" and "new maps". But does it also a proper ...