This tag is for questions about how grammar works, e.g. different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean. For questions that ask whether something is grammatical, please use the "grammaticality" tag instead.

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0
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1answer
265 views

Pluralization of nouns left out with conjunction

Can a repeated noun be left out in a conjunction? The particular example I am thinking of is a sentence that starts: Element A and element B.... Which I would shorten as: Element A and B... ...
-4
votes
1answer
194 views

“Bongo is screaming”: is “screaming” an adjective? [closed]

If I say, "Bongo is screaming", would screaming be an adjective?
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Can there ever be such a thing as “proper grammar” knowing that languages change over time? [duplicate]

Who decides what is "proper grammar"? Who decides when to make changes when the grammar of the people change, and why is it important to follow "proper grammar" if languages change so often? Edit: to ...
-3
votes
2answers
200 views

X Shared Y's Something [closed]

I was looking up information about popes and then I found this: found here Pope Julius III (1550–1555) was alleged to have had a long affair with Innocenzo Ciocchi del Monte. The Venetian ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

“Let him wait” or “Keep him waiting” or “Make him wait” [closed]

There is someone I do not want to see. What can I say to my assistant: Let him wait. Keep him waiting. Make him wait. What is the difference among these?
16
votes
3answers
3k views

What kind of construct is 'would that that were all'?

There is a place in Bram Stoker’s Dracula where I can’t quite parse the grammar: 8 May. — I began to fear as I wrote in this book that I was getting too diffuse. But now I am glad that I went ...
11
votes
5answers
817 views

Is this contraction of 'there is' acceptable to native speakers of English?

In the Slate article, The Curse of “You May Also Like”, the following sentence has a contraction of there is that doesn't sit well with my ear for American or British English. I wonder whether any of ...
-1
votes
1answer
709 views

Two questions about question tag

I want to ask about two sentences, and what would be the correct way to form a question: It's very important that we eat healthy food, ...........? Which would be the correct question tag: ...
3
votes
3answers
227 views

What tense should be used when looking at an old photo?

Commenting on a photo which was taken a few years back: Question: Is this you? Should I reply: Yes, this is a few years back. or: Yes, this was a few years back. Which of the ...
-3
votes
1answer
338 views

What should be done for making this sentence more clear? [closed]

"About the scenario, there are insert transactions on every 3 seconds. In a busy day, about 3000 rows for big table, another 100 for medium table and around 30 for small table." There is a question ...
-2
votes
1answer
488 views

use “past participle” instead of “ing” [closed]

How long had they been sleeping-when he woke them up? The more correct sentence should be "How long had they been slept-when he woke them up?" because they had ended their sleep after he woke them ...
4
votes
1answer
4k views

Fall Hard For Something

I am trying to find the right definition of "hard" in this piece of writing: newspaper Looking for a tranquil hideaway after years as a paparazzi magnet, Mr. Frazier bought the single-level ...
-2
votes
1answer
3k views

When do we use “to” as an infinitive marker? [closed]

In these two sentences: I look forward to get. I look forward to getting it. Why is the first sentence incorrect? When do we use to as an infinitive marker?
-5
votes
1answer
332 views

The Meaning And The Difference Between We Gotta Do Verses We Get To Do [closed]

I want to know the meaning and the difference between :- We Gotta Do V/S We Get To Do FYI:- Someone said to me we believe :- We gotta do whereas we get to do Please explain the ...
0
votes
2answers
836 views

Future Passive Progressive? [duplicate]

Does some future passive progressive tense exist, such as: He will be being interviewed by police." as a counterpart to the past passive progressive tense, such as: He was being ...
0
votes
1answer
314 views

Which of the following are gramatically correct when describing people's speech?

"I like horse," screams Hendry. "I like horse," scream Hendry. "I like horse," Hendry screams "I like horse," Hendry screamed (why used past tense) Say you are writing a story about people talking ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Can “kitchen” be used as an adjective? eg: Mother painted the kitchen wall [closed]

My little sister was to identify the adjective in this sentence: "Mother painted the kitchen wall purple and green". I understand how kitchen can be an adjective as in kitchen sink, but I'm not sure ...
1
vote
1answer
7k views

'by mistakenly, he dropped it' is it grammatically correct?

Can I use both words 'by mistakenly' together? I feel that either I can put it as ' by mistake' or as' mistakenly' but not together.
2
votes
4answers
4k views

What is the difference between “skilled” and “skillful”?

What is the difference between skilled and skillful? When can I use one, when can I used the other? He is skilled/​skillful. He is a skilled/​skillful musician. (Anything else?) From the ...
6
votes
4answers
7k views

Which is correct: “on two weeks” or “in two weeks”?

In below sentence it's mentioned "on two weeks": They'll quite happily squander a whole year's savings on two weeks in the sun. whereas so far I learned to speak in this way: They'll ...
-1
votes
1answer
3k views

Can I say “Very welcome to talk to you”?

Scenario: A friend wants to talk with me about something that makes her sad, but she's busy at the moment and wants talk later. I want to express that I'll be pleased to listen to her. Can I say: ...
4
votes
8answers
1k views

What's a word for “stopping a habit”? [duplicate]

What is a suitable word for stopping doing something that had already became part of our habit, like drinking wine or to stop drinking beer? I had a computer dictionary and the word that comes out is ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“as much as” vs. “as much as is”"

In a textbook, I read this sentence: Stretch your arms as much as is comfortable for you. But can you say it without the is? Stretch your arms as much as comfortable for you. Is there any ...
3
votes
2answers
368 views

Is “Who is he?” ok when we don’t know the sex?

Suppose I see someone coming whose gender is unknown; how should I ask who the approaching person is? Should I say “Who is he?”
2
votes
3answers
146 views

Is this a proper use of a semicolon and the word “whom”?

PCAs are usually assigned to an individual with a physical, mental, behavioral, or emotional handicap; whom they work with throughout the year. Is this sentence grammatically correct? I know ...
4
votes
0answers
571 views

Guide to English Articles [closed]

I'm looking for a full and complete guide to English articles like THE, A, AN, (none). Can anyone recommend me something like that? I'd like to finally learn this and never make a mistake again. ...
8
votes
1answer
5k views

“created at” or “created in”

I'm making a program and I need to label a "creation date" field. I'm not sure whether to write Created in __ or Created at __
0
votes
3answers
931 views

General rules for identifying conditional sentences?

I am trying to identify the subject and object in the following sentence: Come to me, and I'll give you a fight you'll never forget At first, it appeared as if whenever a conjunction appears ...
7
votes
5answers
8k views

“When I'm sad, I stop being sad and be awesome instead”

In "How I met your mother" TV series, there is a character Barney Stinson, who is the author of this semi-popular quote: When I'm sad, I stop being sad and be awesome instead. [sic!] Obviously, ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

could versus be able

Let me start by saying what is written in grammar books on this issue and after that I will put my question. (Take heed that this usage of "could" ONLY refers to the past and ONLY to affirmative ...
-2
votes
1answer
103 views

Incentive Structure Biased [closed]

Can nonhuman things have bias? Politicians are subject to an incentive structure biased toward the adoption of projects and programs with highly visible immediate benefits and well-hidden costs. ...
-1
votes
2answers
608 views

The Present Perfect vs The Past Tense in English [closed]

Would you agree that the present perfect is used more than the past tense by native speakers to emphasize the situation at hand? Some languages, like Arabic and Japanese, use the simple past much ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

“when” + conditional sentence + tense

1: She said she would do it when she came home. 2: She said she would do it when she comes home. Which is correct, and why?
3
votes
3answers
356 views

Is the use of the word “irony” correct in this paragraph?

I recently came across a Facebook post, about a city in India known as Patiala. I was arguing with the admin, about the correct usage of the word irony. Is the word correctly used in the following ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

“Hold Out Promise” vs “Make a Promise”

Is "hold out a promise" the same meaning as "make a promise"? Or did I misunderstand them? I found definitions for "make a promise", but couldn't find definitions for "hold out a promise".
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votes
3answers
2k views

Is it correct to use “either” and “too” interchangeably?

The other day, I heard someone say: I want it either. It comes strange to me. I'm usually used to hear/say: I want it too. Is it grammatically correct to use either of them?
2
votes
3answers
91 views

X should have Y to Z (in the past)

I was doing some literature homework today, when I became confused as to whether or not the following sentence is grammatical: X and Y should have killed Z to have prevented Z from killing them. ...
2
votes
1answer
10k views

“Overlaid” or “overlain” as an adjective [closed]

I have a set of three images, which I have put on top of each other in an image editing program and made transparent. I would like the filename to describe what I have done with the component images. ...
0
votes
3answers
875 views

a hard close look [closed]

Are "close" and "hard" the same below? He took a close look at the cat. He took a hard look at the cat. Or are they subtly different? For this particular usage, web dictionaries appear ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Purpose For, Of [closed]

1 He has no intention for marriage. 2 He has no intention of marriage. These two sentences are good English and have the same meaning. In this PDF I read: A review of the grading permit ...
1
vote
1answer
8k views

'Has found' versus 'found' [duplicate]

When would one say "she has found her keys" as opposed to "she found her keys"? Are they equivalent, or at least partially equivalent? I'm not a native speaker and have been unable to find a pattern ...
0
votes
1answer
101 views

“X is famous” vs. “X was famous” [duplicate]

When saying a sentence like: Nikola Tesla __ famous because he was a genius. Should the blank be replaced by is or was? Or is it dependent on when the person is/was famous? If so, what exactly ...
0
votes
4answers
3k views

How to ask “Where are you going?” when event already passed? [closed]

If my friend went to somewhere on weekend but i didn't know where did he go? And if i want to ask him like "Where are you going?" on Monday which sentences should i ask him? Where did you go? Where ...
1
vote
3answers
921 views

How to use the question mark in multiple choice questions?

Which one of the following three forms is correct for a multiple choice question? Do you prefer the blue dress? or the red shirt? Do you prefer the blue dress or the red shirt? Do you ...
6
votes
2answers
8k views

“Suspect” versus “Suspicious” as Adjectives

A recent question on this site ("to suspect" vs "to be suspicious of") asks about the difference between "to suspect" and "to be suspicious of." An even more complicated situation ...
5
votes
3answers
49k views

“on par with” vs “on a par with”

Which of "on par with" and "on a par with" is the more correct way of saying that two things are of equal value, and why? Examples from a couple of google searches: "His verbal intelligence was not ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

“to suspect” vs “to be suspicious of”

What's the difference between "to suspect someone" vs "to be suspicious of someone"? For example, what's the difference between these two sentences: I'm sorry for suspecting you. I'm sorry for ...
3
votes
3answers
21k views

'Keeping up-to-date on' or 'Keeping up-to-date with'?

I recently replied to someone who was informing me about my application for something. I replied "Thank you for keeping me up-to-date on my application". Afterwards I wondered if I should have written ...
2
votes
2answers
351 views

Can “with” be replaced by “to” after verbs? [closed]

Does this replacement change the meaning to something wrong? Examples: I came with her or I came to her I talk with you or I talk to you
4
votes
5answers
20k views

When is “to” a preposition and when the infinitive marker?

I want to see you. I look forward to seeing you. How can one say "to" in the first sentence is an infinitive marker and in the second sentence a preposition when we are given just the ...