This tag is for questions about how grammar works, e.g. different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean. For questions that ask whether something is grammatical, please use the "grammaticality" tag instead.

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2
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4answers
2k views

“Process of Shipment” vs “Process of Shipping”

Which one of the two expressions "Process of shipment" and "Process of shipping" seem correct? The NyTimes seems to be using both of them: ...
0
votes
2answers
9k views

Should I use support or supports with data? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is “data” considered singular or plural? Which one the following is right grammar "Limited data support the use of ..." or "Limited data supports the use ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

“My ear hurts” Or “My ear is hurting”

Which tense is best suited to describe sickness and pain? In the example below, what are the differences between the two usages? Which one sounds more natural? My ear hurts My ear is hurting ...
1
vote
1answer
11k views

Periods in quotes and how to end the sentence the quote lies in [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should I punctuate around quotes? If I am quoting someone in my writing, and I end their quote with a period, and the end of the quote is also the end of my ...
4
votes
2answers
17k views

“If we were to agree” vs “If we are to agree”

In an undecided situation that needs to be discussed, which one of the following seems more accurate? Are they interchangeable? If we were to agree on this deal, do you think we can start ...
0
votes
0answers
78 views

It Don't Mean a Thing? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: The grammaticality of “that don't impress me much” There is a jazz piece called "It Don't Mean a Thing". Should that be "It Doesn't Mean a Thing?" I've ...
2
votes
0answers
690 views

Whats' wrong with the following sentence? [closed]

One thing that despise me is when people cannot look me in eye. I believe that the statement is grammatically wrong since we are using passive voice in the sentence so it should be 'despises' ...
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

Pronunciation of “accept” [closed]

When I hear people say I accept especially in the U.S., it sounds like they are saying "I except". What is the correct pronunciation?
1
vote
5answers
9k views

How to say that you are going to do something really soon? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Do it very quickly” vs “do it ASAP” Quite often I need to say that I will do something really soon - e.g. in a few hours, but not sure how much ...
3
votes
1answer
139k views

“have been” versus “had been” in questions [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How do the tenses in English correspond temporally to one another? "I can tell that he's not English, but I wouldn't had been able to tell that he's french if you didn't ...
-1
votes
1answer
180 views

Which article fits better in this sentence? [closed]

Please read the instruction(s) in exercise 1. or Please read an instruction in exercise 1.
0
votes
2answers
3k views

“…that enriches people's everyday life” or “…that enrich people's everyday life” [closed]

What is correct: "…that enriches people's everyday life" or "…that enrich people's everyday life"
0
votes
1answer
13k views

'Simple things make me happy.' Or is it 'makes me'? [closed]

I know that 'simple things make me happy.' is correct. Then I read this sentence in a novel: 'simple things makes me happy.' Where actually, it doesn't sound wrong, but I don't know about the ...
1
vote
4answers
392 views

“Idealistic me decided otherwise” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do we use the object instead of the subject pronoun in constructions like “stupid me”? Is this correct: Idealistic me decided otherwise. Word ...
3
votes
2answers
14k views

Is the sentence “There is a large number of labourers who want to migrate to Japan for work.” correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: A number of questions “has been” or “have been” asked? There is a large number of labourers who want to migrate to Japan for work. I type ...
1
vote
1answer
737 views

How to work something [closed]

Could you tell me if this sounds right? Do you know how to work the projector?
0
votes
1answer
5k views

Is “I'll when” proper form? [closed]

A friend of mine keeps using a contraction like this and I keep correcting him by asking "I'll what?". He doesn't get it though, and no matter how much I try to explain it doesn't seem to sink in. ...
1
vote
0answers
118 views

“Try not to” vs “try to not” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Order of “not” with infinitive When negating verbs that are commonly followed by the infinitive, is there a difference in meaning between placing the "not" ...
5
votes
4answers
17k views

“You aren't in” vs. “You're not in” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “They are not”: “they're not” versus “they aren't” I noticed that you aren't in and you're not in are two ways to shorten you ...
8
votes
0answers
412 views

Infinitive without “to”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”? Today I found this headline on bbc.co.uk How one ...
1
vote
1answer
21k views

When to use “verb to be”/“do” in question? [closed]

When I ask questions like "Are you tried?", "Is he usually come on time?", is it grammatically correct or not? Can I ask "Do you tried?" and "Does he usually come on time?" What rules apply when I ...
2
votes
0answers
1k views

What are the common English mistakes that native Russian speakers make? [closed]

I've lived in the US for 10 years. I've never learned grammar formally and usually rely on intuition to guide me. What really bothers me as of recently is my tendency to really get stuck on a ...
4
votes
1answer
4k views

Good book on English grammar from the very beginning [closed]

My wife is fairly new in US and her native language is Ukrainian. Though she is not afraid of speaking english, she does it with lots of grammar mistakes, starting from wrong sequence of words in a ...
2
votes
1answer
448 views

What's it called when you make an adjective post-positive? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify? In English, adjectives usually precede the nouns they describe, as in "organic carrots". However, in some cases ...
0
votes
0answers
102 views

“It's me” or “It's I” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which one is correct to say: “It's me” or “It's I”? Which of these is correct? "It's me" or "It's I". I hear these both colloquially but ...
3
votes
1answer
173 views

addressee-new vs discourse-new

Regarding terminology used by CEGL as referenced in this question, can anyone explain the difference between addressee-new and discourse-new? My understanding of addressee-new is that this refers to ...
2
votes
1answer
6k views

There were ten people, of who/whom 5 [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What's the rule for using “who” or “whom”? Please help me with the grammar here. An explanation would be extra nice, that way I can get it ...
3
votes
0answers
83 views

How to use “my” correctly in a plural possessive? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is “my wife and I's” correct, or should it be “my wife's and my”? Are the following sentences grammatically correct? If not, how should I ...
9
votes
3answers
840 views

Pronoun immediately following its antecedent

Is placing a pronoun immediately after its antecedent in a sentence valid grammar? Is there a term for this construction? Some examples are: President Obama, he gave a speech last night. The ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Usage of “than”

Buying on margin means borrowing money from a broker to buy more securities than can be purchased with one's own money alone. I was wondering if than in the above example is a conjunction or ...
2
votes
0answers
159 views

Why it is so important capitalize 'i'? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why should the first person pronoun 'I' always be capitalized? I'd like to understand the phenomen, why writer's person is so important in English, that i can't ...
3
votes
3answers
306 views

Is there any pragmatic implication in ‘Beaky has enjoyed London’ here?

It says on a grammar book that in some cases, the present perfect form has pragmatic meanings. Joan has broken the teapot. (I have to get a new one.) I’ve had a bath. (I’m now clean.) Is ...
7
votes
5answers
7k views

Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify?

Right now I can only think of one instance in which this regularly occurs. The adjective proper is sometimes placed after the noun it modifies, e.g: Reptilia: A class of cold-blooded oviparous or ...
2
votes
5answers
1k views

“A classmate and I was” vs “A classmate and I were”

I'm writing a resume right now targeted towards a specific company. My girlfriend (a classmate) and I were (see, I don't know if that's the right word, hence this question!) the first from our school ...
2
votes
1answer
697 views

What is the proper (practical/efficient) way to analyze a sentence?

One is given the sample sentence: The fat blind man ran from the dog. What are the procedural steps to deduce the subject and predicate from the sentence? What are the general steps to ...
14
votes
3answers
3k views

“He recommended that they are separated” - is this valid?

I've seen and heard this kind of construction several times now and it always bugs me. When someone recommends something, surely the verb used in the subclause should be infinitive, so: He ...
1
vote
2answers
676 views

What's the grammatical term for this phenomenon? [closed]

There is obviously a big essential difference between "no towel" and "there isn't a towel". I mean, the former cannot probably serve as a complete sentence, while the latter can. The former can ...
1
vote
1answer
16k views

Where should I put the commas in a sentence containing “as well as”?

What is the proper way to punctuate a sentence containing "as well as"? For example, in the sentence: I hope to provide students with a solid foundation in the field as well as challenge them ...
1
vote
3answers
4k views

Greeting words in emails [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: 'Thanks and Regards,' or 'Thanks and regards,'? In emails, there are greeting words such as Best regards and Best wishes. Should we capitalize the second ...
0
votes
3answers
632 views

Would “well done” also apply to a presently proceeding action?

Would "well done" also apply to a case, in which the performer of the action, the one for which he is receiving a praise, is still performing it at the moment of receiving the praise, in other words, ...
4
votes
4answers
3k views

“I don't think you X” versus “I think you don't X”

Consider the following two sentences: I don't think you love your father. I think you don't love your father. Is the second sentence correct? I was taught it is wrong.
2
votes
2answers
789 views

Grammar analysis of this sentence from a magazine

I am reading the latest Time magazine, how should the structure of the following sentence be analyzed? Taken together, their stories tell not only of the tragedies and rare triumphs of that day ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Improving written English and Grammar [closed]

What is the best way to improve your Grammar and improve your writing style? What would be the best online resource to improve my grammar? I maintain a blog of my own, and I have reasonably good ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Use of the word “have”

In a menu title/button, does "have" need to be used? Is "1" okay or should "2" be used? 1) People who contacted you in the last 24 hours 2) People who have contacted you in the last 24 hours This ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

“Keys to car” or “keys of car”

I saw in a grammar book a sentence that looks weird to me. Kyle gave Loren the keys to his new car. I would have hoped to see of instead of to but it must be correct since it was the sample ...
4
votes
4answers
4k views

“Should probably be” vs. “should be probably”

Which one is more correct? This one should probably be similar to the other one. This one should be probably similar to the other one. My gut tells me it's the first one, but I'm not sure.
1
vote
2answers
6k views

John Smith Esquire v. John Smith Attorney v. John Smith Attorney at Law

Which is the most proper way to sign a letter? John Smith Esquire, John Smith Attorney or John Smith Attorney at Law. Besides, does each of those categories denote different levels of engagement in ...
3
votes
3answers
13k views

Should it be “mid 80s” or “mid-80s”?

When discussing temperatures or decades, should it be hyphenated? I understood that two-word adjectives need to be hyphenated, but why does MS Word think this should be, too?
4
votes
3answers
767 views

“Created them flawless/flawlessly”

Which is correct? He created them flawless. He created them flawlessly. If flawlessly is correct, what is it an adverb of?
1
vote
1answer
231 views

Is it okay to use Present Perfect Tense right after “to see how”?

Is it okay to use Present Perfect Tense right after "to see how"? For example, It is both sad and funny to see how these guys have never really got to the core of the matter.