This tag is for questions about how grammar works, e.g. different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean. For questions that ask whether something is grammatical, please use the "grammaticality" tag instead.

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2
votes
4answers
610 views

Conjunction Puzzle: Is this clause dependent or independent?

Third grade teacher here. I plan to teach students to distinguish between simple, compound and complex sentences — but only if I can demonstrate a clear and meaningful difference between the latter ...
3
votes
3answers
6k views

“Is it true?” or “Does it true?” [closed]

I always get confused about: Is it true? Does it true? Where and when should I use one or the other? In other words, when should I pose a question using is and when should I pose it using does?
5
votes
6answers
55k views

Grammatical Names and Grammatical Functions

What is the grammatical name and grammatical function of the part of the sentence that is in bold? What the teacher taught was not in the students' text. The principal ate what was left in ...
5
votes
1answer
597 views

If I was an airline pilot vs. If I had been an airline pilot 10 years ago

In a comment signed by Martha, she wrote that: "If I was an airline pilot" and "If I were an airline pilot" have different meanings. The latter is the subjunctive case (and presumably what ...
0
votes
2answers
6k views

Dear Family & Friends or Dear Friends & Family? [closed]

I would like to begin the speach adressing family & friends... Should I say " Dear Family & Friends " or " Dear Friends & Family "?
2
votes
1answer
172 views

“…three years in.” What does it mean when placing 'in' at the end of a sentence?

I read on Gabriel Weinberg's recent blog: "Startups are a long-term game. My best advice is to treat entrepreneurship as a career path, but it is easier said than done absent some amount of ...
0
votes
2answers
691 views

What's the difference between “She came home angry” and “She came home angrily” [closed]

Are these two sentences grammatically correct? What's the difference between them? She came home angry She came home angrily
0
votes
1answer
5k views

Is this sentence right correct “What I want to do is read this book.”?

"What I want to do is read this book." Is it correct? Or, can I say: "What I want to do is to read this book." "What I want to do is reading this book." Are all of the three sentences correct?
0
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the function of “that” in this sentence?

What is the funcition of "that" in this sentence? The paper notes that conditions in the last warm period in the Atlantic are broadly similar to those observed now. — BBC News, October 7, ...
2
votes
2answers
11k views

“as and when” Usage

Why would one say " you can do that as and when needed" instead of " you can do that when needed" Is there any difference between them?
5
votes
0answers
47 views

Can you end a sentence with a clitic like “they're”? [duplicate]

I saw someone write the sentence "Of course they're". As a native English speaker, this instantly seemed wrong but I couldn't come up with a good reason as to why. I did a bit of research and there ...
0
votes
1answer
572 views

How do I reply? 'It's time you started [to trust me]' or 'It's time you started to [trust me]?

Given the following sentence: 'I don't trust you' - what's the proper way to end the following reply:'It's time you started' or 'It's time you started to'? Is there a rule governing the ...
-1
votes
1answer
99 views

Past perfect usage?

In the following sentence, That task was not added to the TODO document because at that time it had not yet been added to the main document. What I mean here is that back then, during the TODO ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

What are “How to … ?” questions (errors) called?

I see questions formed like "How to do this?" every day. They are so frequent that I wonder if there is a name for grammatical errors of this kind.
0
votes
1answer
657 views

What day is it? or What day is it on?

Are "what day is it?" and "what day is it on?" both correct? Or is one more correct than the other? Or is one correct/formal and the other informal? What would you use in these examples and why: ...
0
votes
1answer
89 views

make question for periodic event

I like to make question about the happening of some events whether it is happened every day or every week or every month...etc how can i make question? this is my try: Does this event happen every ...
1
vote
2answers
826 views

Does a name go before or after the noun it modifies?

The sentence The user “John Smith” has been registered; go to the “User Profile” tab to view the user’s details. reads more naturally to me than The “John Smith” user has been registered; go ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Correct usage of Infinitive [closed]

Can we use to after a past form of verb? Example : I called to Rohini
3
votes
1answer
11k views

“Which Allow me” or “Which Allows me”?

Context: "My work requires me to be at different areas for different events which allow me to learn ..." Do I use "allows" or "allow"? Can you provide me the rules/situations in choosing which one to ...
0
votes
1answer
143 views

Polemic/controversial in noun form [closed]

what would you call the putting forward of a controversial debate? i.e. something is polemic when controversial but you can't say 'i am developing a polemic' (that is, use polemic as a noun) is ...
1
vote
2answers
841 views

What does “any or any” mean in a legal text?

I have been going through several legal documents lately and have realised that a lot of them use the fragment "any or any" within some sentences. Failing to place a guard or fence or warning ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Possessive Question [duplicate]

Would a hypothetical sentence be marked with it? For example, as opposed to: "It's your beating me in chess that angered me." a sentence such as: "It's like you beating me in chess: it'll never ...
3
votes
4answers
12k views

If the rule is “such (a) + adj. + noun”, why is “such fun” correct?

According to my Cambridge Grammar of English, 'such (a)' is used in noun phrases with attributive adjectives. She's such a quiet girl. (such a + adjective + singular countable noun) They're ...
2
votes
0answers
75 views

articles in English [duplicate]

Most of the time I understand how to use articles, but when it comes to certain sentences I start to lose confidence. Could anyone please consider the following uses? In each case I am trying to ...
2
votes
0answers
8k views

For ever and forever [closed]

What is the difference between the meaning and usage of for ever and forever in British English? From what I could gather from my online research, forever means : (also for ever) for all ...
2
votes
2answers
439 views

FCE exam's troubling transformation sentence

Today my students were given the following transformation sentence as part of their FCE exams: I am reading a book which is irrelevant to school work. Do: The book I am reading is ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Non-finite clause complementation of complex transitive verbs

This question has been bothering me for a while. It came up when I was reading Chapter 16 of "A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language." How to explain the grammatical structure of the ...
3
votes
1answer
724 views

grammar: why do we or omit the “do” [duplicate]

very often we see the description like this: Many people realize that they didn't do any wrongdoings, so they cannot understand why they have to be punished. or ...., so they cannot understand why do ...
-1
votes
4answers
589 views

Understanding sentences with double-negation [duplicate]

How should the following sentence be understood? "There isn't no happiness". a) meaning: There IS some happiness . (Because the two negations cancel each other out) b) meaning: There is ...
4
votes
4answers
21k views

Successfully submitted vs Submitted Successfully

When data has been submitted through a form online, which sentence below make the most sense to use? Is one grammatically correct more than the other? Your information has been successfully ...
3
votes
2answers
158 views

“One of this and that” or “One of this or that”?

I am wondering which is the proper way to say that one thing or the other is required. Only one of passport and national id is required. or Only one of passport or national id is required.
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Singular or plural verb after “what”

Which sentence is more grammatically correct? He is being tried on what look like trumped-up charges. He is being tried on what looks like trumped-up charges.
2
votes
1answer
297 views

Job title + possessive case [duplicate]

Is the following construct (grammatically) correct? Swiss mathematician and physicist Leonhard Euler's contribution to number theory was [...] It sounds clumsy to me; however, this rewrite sounds ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Putting “my” in front of a verb [duplicate]

Tough to choose a title for this question. Here's my sentence: "An outcome of this was my leading the development of a budget management plan." OR "An outcome of this was me leading the development ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Parts of speech for “indoors” vs. “outdoors”

I'm trying to enter antonyms by part of speech into a database (for natural language processing) and have run into a problem with "indoors" vs "outdoors". One dictionary lists parts of speech for ...
8
votes
2answers
3k views

Dare + have done

Here is an example from an old book. I know it’s old but it can’t be simply discarded, I hope. "I never dare have spoken — never dare have told you that my love for you was killing me" So, I ...
0
votes
2answers
8k views

Correct punctuation with two nouns? [duplicate]

There's an old play on words that goes like so: Grammar: The difference between helping your uncle Jack off a horse, and helping your uncle jack off a horse. I've been told that it should ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Is the expression 'too much, too young' grammatically acceptable?

I'm happy to see that grammar is being seen as important enough to be taught in English schools ( http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22403731 ) again. I think. At least it might improve some people's ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Correct spelling of “can too” in response to “you can't” [closed]

If someone says "you can't do that" there's a colloquial response of "can too". Is it "can too" or "can to"?
0
votes
1answer
3k views

'An historically accurate claim 'vs. 'a historically accurate claim' [duplicate]

'An historically accurate claim ' OR 'a historically accurate claim' Which of these is grammatically correct if either one of them. They both sound incorrect to me
-1
votes
2answers
18k views

“requested to” vs “requested from” [closed]

This document has information about checks to be requested from each department. vs This document has information about checks to be requested to each department. Is the usage of both ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Why can we use “inadequate” but not “inspecific”? [duplicate]

I find the use of the word "inspecific" very... natural. It makes sense and flows easily in sentences I speak and write (to myself at least). However, upon inspection, it is apparently not a valid ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“Using” or “by using”? [duplicate]

Example: "The feasibility of this approach has recently been demonstrated using PET/CT technology in a small series of patients". Should this not be: The feasibility of this approach has recently ...
4
votes
10answers
1k views

Why is it ‘A God,’ not ‘God' in Mark Sanford’s “I want to acknowledge a God not just of second chances, but third, fourth, eighth chances”?

There was a quote of ex-South Carolina governor Mark Sanford in his victory speech in the House vacant seat election in the New York Times article (May 13) written by Gail Collins under the title ...
-3
votes
1answer
13k views

Included in or included on [closed]

Which of the following serene is correct? Please note: the North stores are included in the report. We will update te report once the data is available( do I need a commas after "in the report"? ) ...
1
vote
1answer
827 views

Is the sentence 95% of timelines is met incorrect because the noun is plural? [duplicate]

I would like to know whether or not "95% of timelines is met" should actually be "95% of timelines are met" because "timelines" is plural?
1
vote
1answer
1k views

'I am nice, thank you'? [closed]

I would like to know whether, if someone asks me "How are you?" and I reply "I'm nice, thank you", is the word 'nice' grammatically correct?
0
votes
1answer
310 views

Passive, present perfect continuous, past simple

I have been going down my path for few years. I am still going down and find new things. And now I am telling a story about it and how my path started in the past. What to use? how my path started? ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

confusing use of “of which”

Here's a sentence I find confusing: The job of a family therapist is to understand the family culture of which the larger culture, with its many layered meanings, is a part. Which interpretation ...
1
vote
1answer
249 views

Is “Michael here” correct?

Why Michael, vsause's host at the start of each video says "Michael here" instead of "Michael is here"? Is it grammatically correct or just a slang / simplified way of speaking?