1
vote
4answers
323 views

One has to cook himself or themself? [on hold]

Wanted to know which form is better and why One has to cook himself? OR One has to cook themself?
0
votes
2answers
49 views

Was vs had been

I guess this question has been asked before, but please take a look the following sentence and tell me if there is a difference between them. When the transaction had been completed, A was still a ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

According to protesters - correct; according to THE protesters - possible?

Source: http://rt.com/news/mariupol-base-shooting-ukraine-008/ They called on the troops to abandon the base, but the soldiers didn't listen, the demonstrators said. Instead, the troops opened ...
1
vote
3answers
44 views

“similarly to” in the sentence beginning

Similarly to the previous version of this product, this version contains the same feature and .... (a long description of the product) Is the usage of "similarly to" in the sentence beginning ...
-2
votes
0answers
34 views

what is the expression according as use for exactly? [closed]

What is wrong with these two sentences? Rearrange these boxes according as you are told. Rearrange these boxes accordingly as you are told. Are they both grammatically correct and if not what is wrong ...
-3
votes
1answer
55 views

“The meaning of this word” vs. “The meaning to this word” [closed]

Occasionally I observed that some native speakers will use preferably the construction "the meaning to (a word, phrase, etc.)" whereas others will go for the more common grammatical turn "the meaning ...
2
votes
4answers
97 views

What adverb, typical of AmE, coincides the most with the BrE sense to “quite” [=to a noticeable or partial extent]?

As long as -- seemingly -- the adverb "quite" in AmE idiomatically carries an emphatic sense to it -- pretty much similar to saying "completely" or "absolutely" as in "That girl looks quite pretty!" ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

“In back of'' vs. ”back of“ vs. the spatial sense of ”behind" in AmE

What's the difference to these expressions, as in "The little girl was hiding in back of the tree" vs. "The little girl was hiding back of the tree" vs. "The little girl was hiding behind the tree"? ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

In/on for “into/onto” in colloquial and not so formal AmE

If the context is crystal clear and, as such, allows no risk of misunderstanding or ambiguity whatsoever, unlike "Paul jumps into the lake (= Paul jumps into the lake from a certain point)" vs. "Paul ...
0
votes
2answers
59 views

Show Disrespect/Poor Behavior

The first sentence is good English: "The students showed disrespect toward the teacher." "The students showed poor behavior toward the teacher." Is the second sentence also good?
0
votes
3answers
60 views

“in” versus “at”

1 - I'm at home. 2 - I'm in the home. 3 - I'm at the home. I understand that the above three sentences are correct. If all the above are correct, then why this one is wrong? 4 - I'm ...
-3
votes
1answer
90 views

Is it grammatically acceptable to drop “to” in constructions such as [to cater “to” someone] and [to entitle someone “to” something]?

Back when I was a student, I was taught as a rule that verbs such as "cater" and "entitle" should be followed by "to" before "someone" and "something" respectively. Yet, I was kind of puzzled the ...
0
votes
2answers
74 views

What is the difference between “a” and “per”?

1.The train runs 60 miles an hour. 2.The train runs 60 miles per hour. What is the differen between the two sentences.
1
vote
1answer
78 views

I want to know the meaning of “ to be”

There are two sentences She appears to be stupid. She appears stupid. What is the difference between the two sentences?
0
votes
1answer
61 views

In AE, is it okay to drop “with” in grammatical constructions with “to supply”, “to furnish”, “to present”, “to issue”, and “to endow”?

In analogy with "to provide" and "to feed", which can be both constructed with and without "with" (at least in AE) -- [This application will provide you (with) all the information you need] and [The ...
-3
votes
2answers
56 views

what does it mean, “foot up” as verb? [closed]

I'm just guessing "foot up" means "kick something up"? Can I say "do it , or foot up your face"? Thanks,
2
votes
1answer
122 views

“As long as” for “since” in AE

Some of you might have noticed that I oftentimes use the conjunction "as long as" in my questions and my posts. I was just wondering -- does "as long as" in the sense "since" [=in view of the fact ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Had you had asked

Let's say in this scenario: Someone asked me for help to do certain thing. I gave a negative response. That person then asked for the reason. I responded with: "Had you had asked me nicely ...." ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

“Decide/Intend on [gerund]” vs. “decide/intend to [infinitive]”

In analogy with "plan on [gerund]", do the gerund constructions above have any currency in AE, or are these chiefly dialectal and might sound folksy to most ears? E.g. We decided on taking our ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

What is the difference between transplant and transplantation when they are used as noun

transplant is used as verb in a normal sentence. In particulary, transplant is used as noun in some sentence. Is there any reason why we should use 'transplant' as noun form although we have already ...
-1
votes
2answers
60 views

“A food is fed (to) someone or something” vs. “Someone or something is fed on (or with) a food” [closed]

Focusing on the passive voice, which of the following grammatical constructions is (or are) more typical of AE? More research is necessary before *soy formula is fed to babies^ source More ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

“Should I” vs. “Shall I” vs. “Do I” in AE

In colloquial prose, is there some difference to saying "Should I/we", Shall I/we", "Do I/we" to ask someone's advice? E.g. Should I call the police? Sounds like I'm asking someone (or myself) ...
-1
votes
1answer
100 views

I've been betrayed by the Jedi Order, but I don't wish “for” them to all die [closed]

Does the presumably nonstandard construction "(verb) for someone/something to (verb)" instead of "(verb) (someone/something) to (verb)" have any currency in modern day colloquial AE speech and "not so ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

“Assist someone do” vs. “assist someone to do (or ”in/with“ doing)”

I just recently came across "assist someone do" searching Google for examples to my previous question, and would like to check with you whether it is an acceptable option to "assist someone to do (or ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

'See' and 'Hear' in the progressive?

I'd like you to go into details about the difference between 'see', 'hear' and 'seeing', 'hearing'. I'm not a native speaker, so it's a bit hard to understand this explanation that 'see' and 'hear' ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

“To be headed for” and “To be headed over to”

Can these expressions be used just about interchangeably for all but the most formal prose, or is there a subtle difference to them? E.g. He is headed over to the garage. He is headed for the ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

“He's liable/likely to win” and “He's likely/liable to lose”

"Liable" is often loosely used in colloquial, nonstandard AE for likely:"My favorite horse is liable to win" -- but discriminating use generally applies "liable" only to what is undesirable: "An ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

“Return” and “come back” as intransitive verbs

Does "return" imply a longer absence than "be back" -- in analogy with "Batman returns (after a ten-year absence) -- in such a way that it would sound sort of awkward or weird to say of someone that ...
0
votes
3answers
45 views

Using 'the' with abbreviations of nouns [duplicate]

Consider United States of America or United Kindgom. While using these, it is customary to add the before it. Eg. I'm travelling to the United Kingdom However, when I use the abbreviation, it ...
1
vote
1answer
124 views

“Opposite of (someone/something)” for “across from/opposite” in nonstandard colloquial prose

Consider the following quotes (emphasis mine). For a split second, I meet eyes with an older man standing in a still gaze just opposite of me amidst the sudden chaos. source Taking a seat ...
1
vote
2answers
60 views

Difference between “not as…as” and “not …er than”

In what kind of situation can we use "not as...as" not "not ...er than"? This question is not as easy as that one. This question is not easier than that one. This question is more difficult ...
13
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the grammatical function of “a Catholic” in “She was raised a Catholic”?

I was drawn to the following line in New York Times (Feb.25) article: “De Blasio, who has said his mother was raised a Catholic but did not bring him up in the church.” ...
3
votes
3answers
228 views

Visit us at (the) booth 24, (the) room 56 etc. It's wrong, but why?

I know that "the" is wrong here, but I can't explain why it's wrong to my friend here, and I have trouble formulating a google search to find some descriptive "rule" or something. Help please?
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Passive voice in this sentence

I am a bit confused about these sentences below. The word "encumbered" baffles me. "Encumbered" is usually used in passive sentences. I am not able to understand the agent in these following ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Does not or Might not?

This is the message: The user might not fall under the scope of this policy. It denotes that a setting is not applied to the user because the user is not part of the policy. He's surely not ...
0
votes
2answers
128 views

'Deflected Off of' vs 'Deflected off' [duplicate]

A question straight from the football commentary pages : X's shot deflected off of Y before finding its way into the net. What is the correct usage here ? Deflected off of or deflected off ?? ...
0
votes
2answers
84 views

To see them play and to see them playing

Excuse my limited acquaintance on English usage; which sentence is grammatically correct, and if any, which meaning do they convey to ? I saw them play chess. I saw then playing chess. Many ...
3
votes
2answers
163 views

English Syntax Rules Based on Word Choice

I was reading the Wikipedia article on Animacy and came across something I found to be very interesting: The higher animacy a referent has, the less preferable it is to use the preposition of for ...
0
votes
1answer
188 views

Are “I will have been going” and “I would have been going” rarely used today?

As far as I know these are tenses that you do not often use. Am I right? Will have been + verb+ing Would have been + verb+ing
4
votes
2answers
103 views

Infinitive Clause For “Curious”

I need some help about the infinitive clause that comes after "curious". Let's say that I am "curious" about a locked room. Then, could I write this: I am curious to open the door. I ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Correspond to vs. Correspond with

Is there any significant difference between Correspond to and Correspond with? I only mean in the sense of "matching", here, rather than "communication". I've looked at a few sources, but I can't ...
0
votes
1answer
118 views

Meaning of “Smiles Slip”

I don't quite understand something: source Brazil will, in one form or another, be ready for the World Cup. But when it comes to hosting the tournament, those famous Brazilian smiles may ...
4
votes
3answers
176 views

Meaning of “Discretion”

I saw this dictionary entry, and it says "discretion" could mean approximately either 1) the right to choose what to do or 2) the quality of being careful what you do. The dictionary has these two ...
1
vote
2answers
82 views

the main usage of the “to” as a prepositional condition

when I was young I wasn't from the English area but I am used to learning English grammar already. Well , I am still thinking about one thing maybe because I had not even got to learn this grammar ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Is the “for + proposition” form still used nowadays? [duplicate]

I am currently studying English and as such enjoy reading English books from time to time; for instance I have recently been reading the fifth book of A Song of Ice and Fire since the French version ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

Word being modified by whose

I came across the following sentence: "Kiran is Kishore's uncle, whose paternal grandfather has only two children." I am not clear which person is 'whose' referring to - Kiran or Kishore and why?
0
votes
2answers
172 views

Is “as you need” different from “as you need to” in this sentence?

To utilize things as(when) you need to, but never be captivated by things.(self-made, a translation from ancient text in Chinese) I think "as you need" and "as you need to" is different in this ...
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

Using “An” and “A” in a sentence [duplicate]

I'm trying to understand this simple concept. As far as I understood it, back to the days when I was a student, "an" should be used only before vowel words, that is, only before the following words: ...
0
votes
3answers
202 views

“I grip the steering wheel like I grasp TO my memory of that day.” Is that “to” wrong? Omit, or change to “at”?

In the sentence above, is "grasp to my memory of..." wrong? It feels wrong, but I can't articulate why. I might say "grasp at my memory of" or perhaps omit the preposition all together. I fear ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

“Would it be” vs “Will it be”

I was writing an email to my colleague and as part of it I wrote Would it be possible for you to help me with this? I felt a bit awkward after sending the mail. Should it be would or will? I ...