-2
votes
0answers
34 views

what is the expression according as use for exactly? [closed]

What is wrong with these two sentences? Rearrange these boxes according as you are told. Rearrange these boxes accordingly as you are told. Are they both grammatically correct and if not what is wrong ...
0
votes
2answers
78 views

Is this right: “the whole France”?

I am not sure if this phrase is right: “for the whole France”. Here's the context: Sam applied these methods successfully at some sites in France and then was extended for the whole France by ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

“Me neither” - why oblique case? [duplicate]

I don't like white wine. Me neither. We're talking about subjects here, so naturally the pronoun should be "I". The use of "me" would only make sense to me if "neither" was a postposition. ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

“To predicate” + of or + as or + some other preposition

I'm interested in Definition 1.1 at Oxford Dictionaries which exemplifies "predicated of." Yet, would "predicate as" be equally correct? Google Ngram depicts a difference, but not Google Books ...
1
vote
1answer
153 views

“Help in doing something” or “Help doing something”

Is the preposition in necessary or abundant? To be specific, which of these two sentences sounds better/is correct? This helps in achieving better fuel economy. or This helps achieving ...
1
vote
3answers
89 views

ending a sentence with a preposition 'of'

I know many questions have been asked for ending a sentence with a preposition in this community. However none of that seems to be providing the answer which I am looking for in this scenario. Please ...
1
vote
4answers
149 views

Graduate student in or of?

In my cover letter I want to write that I am a graduate student in statistics. But I am not sure about the "in". So what is correct? I am a graduate student in statistics. I am a graduate ...
4
votes
2answers
316 views

Can a prepositional phrase be the direct object?

We're covering grammar in English I, and we just got to gerunds. In one of the exercises, I had the sentence "Pilgrims learned about planting crops from the Wampanoags." I'm supposed to find the ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Data of similar characteristics vs. Data with similar characteristics

I have the following sentence that I don't know which preposition is the correct one. Diversification implies a trade-off between selecting data of relevance to user intent and diversifying data ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

Which is better, “on” or “in” + place?

I am sometimes confused the usage of prepositions. I say, "It happened in the bathroom." Native speakers of English would say, "It happened on the bathroom." Is one, both, or none correct? What ...
2
votes
4answers
353 views

“Replace with” versus “replace by”

I often see "replace with" and "replace by" used interchangeably, but this doesn't sound right to me: I replaced that component by this one. I would use "with" in such a sentence. "By" only ...
3
votes
2answers
129 views

Is “because-noun” a new preposition?

There are a handful of articles suggesting that a new preposition has appeared in the form of "because-noun": The Atlantic Stan Carey Grammar Girl Isn't "Because (of)... whatever" a causitive? ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Am I right for the prepositions in this sentence?

I am writing to seek possibilities of having a continuance for my hearing on 02/13/2014.
1
vote
2answers
73 views

Goal “for” or Goal “of”?

The goal for these negotiations is to reach a mutually-agreed long-term comprehensive solution that would ensure Iranˈs nuclear program will be exclusively peaceful. while we have a noun phrase ...
2
votes
2answers
77 views

Effort IN improving?

Could you please let me know if the following excerpt of a sentence is grammatically correct (specifically the preposition after "effort"): "Should there be anything that you feel we are missing, ...
0
votes
1answer
107 views

I have to do it until/by tomorrow. Why both seem to be common?

I have always thought that the correct one is "I have to do it by tomorrow" as "by" is used for some point in the future while "until" is used when something longs until now/that time. Is that ...
0
votes
1answer
204 views

preposition 'to' after verb 'talk' [closed]

I'm confused whether it is correct to use 'to' after 'talk' or not? Some examples would really be appreciated.
0
votes
1answer
139 views

“Staying at my aunt's place” or “staying with my aunt”?

Are both of these sentences correct? Is there any difference in meaning between them? "I'm staying with my aunt." or "I'm staying at my aunt's." What I mean is "remain at her place temporarily." ...
2
votes
2answers
279 views

'for Verb-ing' followed by a preposition

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary gives the definition of sink as follows: a large open container [...] that you use for washing dishes in My question is whether the preposition 'in' is ...
2
votes
3answers
317 views

Usage of “of” in the following sentence

I would like some help in understing the usage of "of" in the sentence: Gender inequality refers to unequal treatment or perceptions of individuals based on their gender. perceptions of ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

How to correctly name a uni assignment? [closed]

Finishing my first in class assignment in an English uni, I struggle with the name (especially with "the" and "of" words). I developed a website X and the document should describe the whole process. ...
1
vote
4answers
223 views

File kept on/at the server? [duplicate]

I want to write that I have saved the file on the server. What should I write, on the server or at the server?
4
votes
4answers
537 views

“Get an idea on/of something”

In general, is it better to say get an idea on or get an idea of something? Here are some examples: In order to get an idea on how to build this house... In order to get an idea of how to ...
0
votes
1answer
225 views

“With use of” or “with the use of”?

Do you solve engineering problems with use of programming methods, or, Do you solve engineering problems with the use of programming methods ? Which one is true? Or are both of them false? If so, ...
1
vote
4answers
144 views

Why is the preposition “in” used twice in this sentence: In 1934, in February…?

This sentence is in the book pattern complete sentence is: In 1934, in February, when the dust was still so thick in the Minnesota air that my parents couldn't always see from the house to the ...
0
votes
2answers
96 views

Emphasis is put on relation of A and B, instead of/on

Having the following sentence, I'm not sure how to use prepositions after 'instead': The emphasis is put on the relation between A and B, instead of on A and B themselves. Is "instead of on" ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Is the “for + proposition” form still used nowadays? [duplicate]

I am currently studying English and as such enjoy reading English books from time to time; for instance I have recently been reading the fifth book of A Song of Ice and Fire since the French version ...
1
vote
1answer
312 views

Preposition with phrase passed away [closed]

Is "My grandmother passed away from cancer last night" grammatically correct and acceptable?
4
votes
3answers
465 views

What preposition is used with “sit” and “computer”?

I personally would say "to sit at the computer", but a friend of mine said he heard "to sit on the computer" from a native speaker. That does not sound right to me at all, and I trust my guts, but ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

“equally skilled as X” or “equally skilled to X”? [closed]

Which of the following (if either) is correct? I consider myself equally skilled as LeBron. I consider myself equally skilled to LeBron.
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Usage of 'to' with ' All that '

Which one of the following statements is grammatically correct? All that act would do is speed up the process of bringing justice to the victims All that act would do is to speed up the process of ...
2
votes
2answers
145 views

“With what […]?” or “What […] with?”

Making a comparison with Who/Whom I now have a doubt about the use of what with prepositions in questions. I'll explain by example: These two sentences are correct, one is more formal than the other: ...
0
votes
3answers
200 views

“I grip the steering wheel like I grasp TO my memory of that day.” Is that “to” wrong? Omit, or change to “at”?

In the sentence above, is "grasp to my memory of..." wrong? It feels wrong, but I can't articulate why. I might say "grasp at my memory of" or perhaps omit the preposition all together. I fear ...
35
votes
7answers
5k views

Why use “of” in the phrase “delivered of a baby”?

With all the "Royal baby" craze comes something that really confuses me. All the news media used pretty much the same sentence to make the announcement: The Duchess of Cambridge has been ...
2
votes
1answer
605 views

A question ending with preposition “of” [duplicate]

I would like to know whether this is correct: He uses a car instead of a bus. What does he use a car instead of?
1
vote
1answer
289 views

‘Sought’ or ‘sought-after’?

In the context of a computation, I would like to refer to “the sought value”. I think this is the most precise and terse formulation. However, I have noticed that people often use “sought-after” ...
-4
votes
1answer
84 views

Program is written in C++ or Program is written on C++ [closed]

Which is right: This program is written in C++. or This program is written on C++.
0
votes
2answers
320 views

“off of the counter” vs “off the counter” [duplicate]

Is the word of necessary? For example: Take the towel off of the counter. vs. Take the towel off the counter.
0
votes
1answer
300 views

Is downtown an adverb of place? [duplicate]

What is the explanation for why we say "I'm going downtown" instead of "I'm going to downtown?"
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Is it proper to use “that” instead of “at which” to refer to speed?

On a physics assignment, I believe that these sentences are grammatically incorrect, but some other students disagree (especially on the second one). What is the maximum speed that the mass can be ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Which preposition: “Write on/at/to this address?”

My exam included this fill-in-the-blank question: Please write __ this address. (on/at/to) I filled the blank with on. Is that correct?
-2
votes
2answers
143 views

Is the sentence “The police had evidence on him.” grammatically correct? [closed]

Please cite some sources to show whether the above phrase is correct or not.
2
votes
2answers
722 views

Prepositions 'in' or 'of' for referring to a population of a country

I was wondering about these prepositions in and of. Actually I was making an assignment in Spanish and I came across this problem and I translated it in English but I am still puzzled as to what the ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“I'm very interested in.” vs “in which I'm very interested.” [duplicate]

You should sell me that book I'm very interested in or is it better to write it as You should sell me that book in which I'm very interested I know that the former is more informal than the ...
3
votes
2answers
269 views

Why is it “objections to moving”, not “objections to move”? [closed]

I got this sentence from the Economist: There are two primary objections to moving to the chained CPI. My question is, why have they used moving instead of move after objections to?
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Which preposition should be used when referring to an exact date?

I read this in a text book: My test is on 22th of June. I saw this in a YouTube tutorial: My test is at 22th of June. Which sentence uses the right preposition?
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Which is correct: “on two weeks” or “in two weeks”?

In below sentence it's mentioned "on two weeks": They'll quite happily squander a whole year's savings on two weeks in the sun. whereas so far I learned to speak in this way: They'll ...
1
vote
3answers
318 views

Purpose For, Of [closed]

1 He has no intention for marriage. 2 He has no intention of marriage. These two sentences are good English and have the same meaning. In this PDF I read: A review of the grading permit ...
3
votes
4answers
4k views

When is “to” a preposition and when the infinitive marker?

I want to see you. I look forward to seeing you. How can one say "to" in the first sentence is an infinitive marker and in the second sentence a preposition when we are given just the ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

… 'can be found in' 'can be found on' ? (Prepositions)

Which is the correct way of saying, the document can be found in www.example.com/ark or the document can be found on www.example.com/ark or the document is located at www.example.com/ark