1
vote
1answer
70 views

“Having to” usage

I am confused in the usage of "having to" in a sentence, mentioned below. Which one is correct/appropriate? The trouble is having to backup … or The trouble is in having to backup ...
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

What is the difference about two sentences below?

What is the difference about two sentences below? 1.Despite a very old medical therapy, acupuncture is called "new age" treatment. 2.Despite being a very old medical therapy, acupuncture is called ...
0
votes
2answers
70 views

“I'll have the Mesclun Salad,” please [duplicate]

"I'll have the Mesclun Salad, please." Note the capitals. This question concerns the definition of a proper noun and how context can subtly change this. Please refer to former question. It is a ...
2
votes
2answers
46 views

Is it correct to write a noun once while listing two related (verbs) activities?

For instance, in the sentence: Without adding new items and modifying existing items. Would it be correct to completely remove the first reference to the noun items? as in: Without adding ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Your Site Visitors or Your Site’s Visitors?

Your site/site’s visitors are very active. How is correct to write: your site visitors or your site’s visitors?
0
votes
1answer
97 views

Is 'subject' in 'is subject to considerable debate' a verb or a noun?

Every once in a while I stumble upon this phrase: ... is subject to considerable debate Examples are easily found on the web, for instance: In the context of suspected cognitive disorders, the ...
2
votes
2answers
108 views

determiner “the” followed by adjective - parts of speech

In English, adjectives usually cannot function as noun or pronouns, at least not to the degree it is possible in German where you can do it without thinking. The old car sucked. The new is better. ...
4
votes
2answers
233 views

What is a “mock euphemism?”

I have to make flashcards for my AP Lang class, but I can't find what a "mock euphemism" is anywhere. Can anyone help?
16
votes
3answers
527 views

''Honey'' Usage Question

my friend (he's from Europe, white in his 20s) was in the U.S. a while ago and went to a diner a few times. A woman there (in her late 40s, most likely), kept calling him ''honey'' and ''sweetie'' ...
1
vote
2answers
352 views

Noun order: “He and we…” or “We and he…”? Similarly, “…him and us” or “…us and him”?

It's convention and polite to always list yourself last in a list. I say "John and I went to the store" and not "I and John went to the store." So does that mean that I should always list myself ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

Grammatical differences between “curio” and “curiosity” when used as an object noun

I've recently heard the term curio when talking about a strange or foreign object, whereas previously I would have used the term curiosity in that context. Is the use of the use of curio a more ...
4
votes
1answer
515 views

Is “swimming” a gerund in “I went swimming”?

What is the function of swimming in the following sentence? I went swimming with some friends yesterday. Is swimming a gerund here? If it is, what is the grammatical function?
1
vote
4answers
684 views

Can “Apple” be an adjective? [duplicate]

What role is the word "apple" playing in the sentence "I ate the apple pie." Is apple an adjective? Or are apple and pie treated together as one noun. Is this true of all words used like this? Can ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Should I capitalize the word 'Web' in this sentence?

A dedicated web server may be required, depending on XXX, YYY, ZZZ, and the total number of concurrent Web users Thanks!
12
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “man” the opposite of “woman”?

I heard someone today say that lad is the opposite of lass. And we picked up a debate on whether woman is actually the opposite of man, which led me to question whether nouns can have opposites at ...
3
votes
1answer
462 views

Lots of questions for a lot of clauses!

I am confused over the use of lots of vs lot of. I am phrasing a sentence having the following clause : [Article] [lot-of/lots-of] [noun singular/plural] [verb] ... As an example : A lot of ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Singular vs. Plural with Multiple Gerunds as Subject (IE: [Gerund] and [Gerund] are/is [something].)

I'm trying to find out whether I should use a singular or plural verb when there are multiple gerunds as the subject of the sentence. For example: Running the correct course and keeping a steady ...
1
vote
3answers
662 views

When to add “the” before a noun followed with a clause

E.g. "Although they work in most cases, they cannot handle cases when a comment or script is broken by the cutting" Should I put "the" between "handle" and "cases"?
1
vote
2answers
270 views

Does a name go before or after the noun it modifies?

The sentence The user “John Smith” has been registered; go to the “User Profile” tab to view the user’s details. reads more naturally to me than The “John Smith” user has been registered; go ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Correct punctuation with two nouns? [duplicate]

There's an old play on words that goes like so: Grammar: The difference between helping your uncle Jack off a horse, and helping your uncle jack off a horse. I've been told that it should ...
0
votes
1answer
295 views

Is downtown an adverb of place? [duplicate]

What is the explanation for why we say "I'm going downtown" instead of "I'm going to downtown?"
-3
votes
1answer
140 views

What part of speech is “(noun) the (noun)”? [closed]

What part of speech is the part boldfaced in these sentences? Chell the protagonist of Portal is a woman. Ludwig Wittgenstein the Austrian-British philosopher worked primarily in logic. Tim ...
2
votes
2answers
566 views

In the sentence “My house is down the street”, which word does the adverb “down” modify?

My house is down the street. Does the adverb down modify is, or street?
-1
votes
1answer
214 views

What term describes the relationship between 'collectivism' and 'collectivisation'?

What is collectivism, in terms of grammar, of collectivisation? Put another way: Collectivism is the [which word?] of collectivisation? Another example word pair might be centralism and ...
5
votes
3answers
212 views

How can one determine if the opposite of an agent noun exists?

We know that the employer employs the employee and that the tutor tutors the tutee, but how do we know if the shooter shot the shootee? Is there a simple way to determine if an agent noun can be made ...
0
votes
1answer
159 views

Whether to use a verbal or a deverbal noun as a modifier?

Which is more grammatically correct: an XXX-inhibiting drug, or an XXX inhibitor drug? It would seem to me that the use of the verbal noun ("inhibiting") as a modifier is more grammatically ...
0
votes
1answer
158 views

Small Question Regarding Article the or a [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there any simple rules for article usage (“a” vs “the” vs none) I always don't understand which one to use, a or the or nothing. I got a ...
5
votes
1answer
561 views

plural noun/singular verb and vice versa [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: None as plural indefinite pronoun In my work I am often exposed to sentences written by nonnative speakers of English. I often come across sentences with a singular noun ...
0
votes
2answers
277 views

Destroy or Destroys [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is a company always plural, or are small companies singular? I came across a mocked up newspaper article earlier and there was a discussion about whether the following ...
3
votes
2answers
334 views

Can the word “luxury” be used as a concrete noun?

I was wondering if we can use the word "luxury" to refer to a "luxurious item", For example, are the sentences below considered grammatical? : I have a luxury. I have one luxury. I have three ...
2
votes
3answers
578 views

In the sentence “Go for a kayak” is “kayak” a verb or a noun?

I thought it would be a verb considering it is being used in place of "ride in a kayak". However if 'a' is a indefinite article, doesn't it have to refer to a noun? Would that make the word 'kayak' a ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify?

Right now I can only think of one instance in which this regularly occurs. The adjective proper is sometimes placed after the noun it modifies, e.g: Reptilia: A class of cold-blooded oviparous or ...
2
votes
1answer
663 views

“Compound nouns list” or “compound noun list”?

I couldn't help but wonder every time I saw such a noun phrase. I've seen both forms used equally often, so I guess both of them can be used interchangeably. But do I guess right? Some examples: ...
-2
votes
1answer
3k views

In this sentence “Me and you” or “You and I ” is correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”? Consider this conversation: "Hey, we've been seeing each other for a couple of months" ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Using multiple verbs with multiple nouns

In a sentence which uses multiple verbs and multiple nouns, is there a way to logically show which verb corresponds to which noun(s)? E.g.  1. I like to buy and eat fish and chips. (Both ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the origin of the phrase “you've got another thing/think coming”?

What is the origin of the phrase "you've got another thing coming"? And — perhaps more importantly — is it more correct than the alternative "you've got another think coming"?
1
vote
1answer
232 views

Expanding “science” and “diligence” usage to direct object

I seem to have seen these phrases: to do science to do due diligence quite a bit in recent years, and they sound funny to me; I wonder whether this usage of "diligence" and "science" as ...
8
votes
1answer
480 views

When can a noun be used attributively?

Nouns can modify nouns: cat food, coffee cup, gold ring, laser surgery, flood insurance. It seems to me there are even cases where a noun sounds better than the corresponding adjective: sociology ...
4
votes
3answers
955 views

Can adjectives always be used as nouns when they denote a plural and are preceded by the definite article?

An adjective appears to be used as a noun when denoting an animate plural and preceded by the definite article: 'The successful are those who strive.' 'The foolish are those who ...
3
votes
2answers
614 views

“Luck”, “coincidence”, “chance” — most appropriate in this situation?

I found my present flat completely by __. luck coincidence chance What will be the most appropriate word in this sentence?
4
votes
2answers
2k views

differences between different noun forms of same adjective

What is exactly the difference between nouning an adjective different ways? Some only have one form, but others have both. Examples: hilarious: hilarity vs. hilariousness virtuous: virtuosity vs. ...
5
votes
1answer
4k views

Is “pain” a noun or a verb?

For example, which of the following sentences is correct: My eyes are paining. There is a pain in my eyes.