0
votes
1answer
72 views

What's the difference betwen perhaps and maybe?

I would like to know how to use them are theres alike? or just two differents words that can be used in the same way?
-1
votes
3answers
47 views

Trouble understanding the meaning of sentences with “unless” [closed]

I am having trouble understanding the meaning of sentences using unless. Here is an example: Unless I hear from you by 6pm Friday I will send the letters to main office. What does the above ...
3
votes
1answer
179 views

Why is the word “so” in the line, “To a ill-informed person I would have so answer yes,” shown in Italic to stress the word?

I am interested in the word, “so” in the following sentence in Jeffery Archer’s novel, “The Prodigal Daughter.” Florentina Kane who is the chairman of an international hotel empire she succeeded ...
1
vote
0answers
124 views

“Mistaken as” vs. “mistaken for”

I heard someone use the words mistaken as rather than mistaken for. Is this correct? If it is correct then what is the difference between the two? Is it ever wrong to use mistaken as, and if so, why? ...
2
votes
3answers
90 views

Is there a term for the phenomenon of adding more words to a sentence makes it less clear?

This article ends with "Judicial races in Washtenaw County are nonpartisan ...". This is technically accurate, but is also misleading (or is it?) as it implies races elsewhere (such as Wayne County) ...
1
vote
2answers
184 views

The use of “So X as to Y”

First of all, note that this is not a duplicate question of another one asking about the usage of so as to, since this one is asking about the structure of so . . . as to. . . . I understand this ...
0
votes
2answers
45 views

To One's Betrayal

I couldn't quite make out this segment in a long sentence: Dad at some celebration where the Comrade President pinned on him a medal for services to the Communists’ betrayal ; Dad in the book is an ...
4
votes
3answers
486 views

“They were seduced” vs. “They were swayed”

I ran across the verb "sway" a little while ago and I was wondering about its usage. See: They were seduced by the low cost of the house. And They were swayed by the low cost of the house. ...
1
vote
2answers
88 views

Didn't you USED TO or Didn't you USE TO? [duplicate]

I was somehow confused encountering this sentence: Didn't you USED TO work with Annie at Macy's?. Should we use USE TO here since we are using Did which needs the base form of the verb.
10
votes
4answers
1k views

What does “Nothing doing as he took it right to him” mean?

I regularly read chess articles on chessbase.com and quite often I find myself struggling with the English they are using. Sometimes it just doesn't feel correct. OK, I am not a native English speaker ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Meaning of ' as long as you fed him, he would be cooperative' [closed]

About the meaning of the sentence 'as long as you fed him, he would be cooperative': (1) The clause 'as long as you fed him' is about past or present one? (2) Depending on the above, the 'would' at ...
-2
votes
3answers
176 views

Can I treat “of course” and “of course not” like “yes” and “no”?

Which of these two expressions is correct? 1) Of course not, I am here. 2) Of course not, I am not here. For example: Yes, he is a boy The word "yes" emphatically introduces a ...
0
votes
2answers
60 views

What is the proper use of the word “state of the art”? [closed]

I am a bit confused with using the phrase state of the art. Is the following usage correct? My motivation relies on the fact, discussed above, that there is little global state of the art ...
7
votes
1answer
115 views

Are “was/were able to” and “could” interchangeable?

In a grammar book, the claim was made that in the following sentences one cannot substitute "was/were able to" with "could." The fire spread through the building very quickly, but everyone was ...
3
votes
2answers
49 views

Is “not having…full time” partial negation or complete negation?

I got a bit confused by this sentence: "I’ve got used to not having a man around full time." I am not sure if it is partial negation or complete negation. Does this mean: I've got used to ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Only requires or requires only [duplicate]

I am always unsure about the position of "only" in the sentence. For example: This ticket only costs 5 dollars. This ticket costs only 5 dollars. Are there any difference? Which one is ...
-2
votes
1answer
45 views

What to use : “that” or “who”? [duplicate]

Consider this sentence : "I was going down the hill and on my step down I saw a guy who appeared to be disguised". "I was going down the hill and on my step down I saw a guy that appeared to be ...
2
votes
5answers
133 views

Term for a choice that you like and you dislike?

First Q here. If this has been asked before sorry (Did search) Term for a choice that you like and you dislike? And you can/would probably only take the choice you like. For example: A justice ...
5
votes
6answers
896 views

Does the word Effortless imply a negative or a positive comment?

I watched a TV show where a group of dancers were performing a number. After that, the host interviewed one of the audience and he was told that the Group A's performance was effortless and gave a low ...
0
votes
2answers
96 views

What are differences between “let”, “allow” and “permit”?

Dad doesn't let me watch that program. Can we use "allow" or "permit" instead of "let"? What are the differences in grammar? Which one is common use?
-3
votes
1answer
74 views

What are differences between “advice” and “advise”? [duplicate]

When we can use advice instead of advise? Can somebody help me?
-1
votes
1answer
42 views

I need a verb to replace “to know” in this sentence [closed]

This paper seeks to know if those who perpetuate rape are the only ones responsible.
1
vote
3answers
345 views

Which sentence is correct to say? [closed]

In a conversation, which of the two sentences below is grammatically correct? There was a party celebrating for my sister's marriage. There was a party which was being celebrated for my ...
-1
votes
2answers
72 views

coming to the shops or going to the shops? [closed]

Which of the following sentences are correct? Do you mind COMING to the shops with me? Do you mind GOING to the shops with me?
-1
votes
1answer
79 views

present continuous, be going to, or both? [duplicate]

In Grammar and Vocabulary for First Certificate (Prodromou, 2005), Chapter 2 covers "the future", "be going to", "present continuous", and "present simple". I put three of the End-Of-Chapter questions ...
-2
votes
1answer
42 views

one 'serving' of sugar - a person serving sugar? [closed]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar_packet A sugar packet is a delivery method for one 'serving' of sugar. Does one there mean a person?
0
votes
1answer
96 views

present continuous or be going to?

In his book, Grammar and Vocabulary for First Certificate, Luck Prodromou has ruled out the possibility of using 'be going to' to complete the following sentence : 'What .......... you .......... ...
2
votes
2answers
166 views

Pit as a past tense verb

The violence pit pro-Russian separatists against Ukrainian forces and those who support the government in Kiev. A friend of mine says pit is used as a past tense verb in this sentence. What is ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

Changing the meaning of sentence by grammar

I would like to ask for meaning of the two following sentence, and whether or not is the grammar correct. Please check my suggestions both "sentences" and meanings. "I wish I never met you." - I met ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Opening sentence in cover letter? [duplicate]

I am currently writing my cover letter for an application. In the opening sentence I want to put emphasis on the most important fact about my profile: That I am a statistician and that this is my ...
-1
votes
4answers
46 views

'As' for contiguous time

"I could have told you that would happen before you even started," said Jane as she sucked on the straw of her cola. In this sentence, Jane is obviously not performing a ventriloquist type act. ...
1
vote
2answers
86 views

The noun that describes the object that is targeting

I'm looking for a word that I can't seem to find, and I'm struggling with how to find it. I'll use a blank in the place of the word and compare it other grammar to demonstrate what I actually mean: ...
0
votes
3answers
68 views

Is it necessary to discern between 'owing to' and 'due to'? [duplicate]

I recently wrote a paper, and the examiner picked me up on using 'due to' when apparently I should have been using 'owing to'. I understand that there is some difference between them, as was discussed ...
0
votes
2answers
95 views

When to use “compatible”, when “incompatible” [closed]

Reworded as requested. I am confused about when one uses the term “incompatible” and when “compatible”. Is it sometimes believed that compatibility is about “working” and incompatibility about “not ...
1
vote
3answers
701 views

“similarly to” in the sentence beginning

Similarly to the previous version of this product, this version contains the same feature and .... (a long description of the product) Is the usage of "similarly to" in the sentence beginning ...
0
votes
2answers
65 views

Only a waning candle sheds its light around

I found above mentioned sentence in a article is it some proverb? What does this mean? Below I am copying paragraph where I found this. May be this would be helpful to answer. Only a waning candle ...
-1
votes
1answer
20 views

Business rules application to design encompasses… - help me make sense of that phrase

This chapter is the final of four chapters covering the case study design of the relational database model for the online auction house company. Business rules application to design encompasses ...
1
vote
2answers
284 views

Meaning of “just as much” and “just as”?

Could someone please tell me their meanings? I know these two have different meanings. And I have been trying to Google them, but they are no help. Can we replace much in the first phrase with any ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

bent upon exerting the fascination he knew was his only by the results

I read this in the novel 'Of Human Bondage' by Somerset Maugham. It follows as below. 'Philip was even more than usually shy and abrupt; and whether on account of this, unconsciously bent upon ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Want something applied - grammar

While it may be obvious to you that you want the aggregate functions applied to each set of products found in the account table, this query fails because you have not explicitly specified how the ...
0
votes
3answers
145 views

Use of the subjunctive mood, “be”

Along with the commercial database servers, there has been quite a bit of activity in the open source community in the past five years with the goal of creating a viable alternative to the ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Comprehension - gave them the run of the base grounds still in Ukrainian hands

During the ordeal, the colonel gave reporters and TV crews the run of the base grounds still in Ukrainian hands, and held impromptu news conferences in front of brigade headquarters. First of ...
1
vote
2answers
72 views

What does “through” mean here?

Through his sleek salesman talk I could discern duplicity.
0
votes
4answers
172 views

How would you say someone was “disrespecting you” correctly? [closed]

Is there a grammatically correct synonym for the word "disrespect" in the form of a verb? As in: "Please stop disrespecting me, Bill."
-1
votes
1answer
57 views

What is the difference about two sentences below?

What is the difference about two sentences below? 1.Despite a very old medical therapy, acupuncture is called "new age" treatment. 2.Despite being a very old medical therapy, acupuncture is called ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Meaning and Correctness of “to have masses said for someone's soul”

What is the meaning of "to have masses said for someone's soul"? I failed to find it in my dictionary. And grammatically, is it correct to say, "to have masses (which are) said for someone's soul"?
-2
votes
1answer
137 views

What did the word “arcade” mean before video games? [closed]

I was browsing a document on the history of Leicestershire in the UK. About halfway down the page, in the "Leicester in the 19th Century" section, it said: Silver Arcade was built in 1899. What ...
3
votes
1answer
306 views

“Will be gone” vs “Will have gone”

1) "By the time you arrive, I'll already be gone " 2 ) "By the time you arrive, I'll already have gone " I think both are grammatically correct but Are there any differences in meaning? And which ...
0
votes
3answers
85 views

What does this line mean?

What is its significance for the enrichment of your knowledge and skills in your chosen course? English isn't my native, so, correct me if I am wrong. I can't really understand what this mean, ...
1
vote
2answers
76 views

I have questions about the paragraph I can't understand

Of groups of atoms collected together and able to think, to look out in wonder at the universe that made us, and build machines that can revisit our origins in the Big Bang. Question 1. What is ...