0
votes
1answer
64 views

Curious words that make me suspicious

I'm curious about that curious object. I'm suspicious of that suspicious stranger. I'm dubious about that dubious plan. I can't think of any other words that allow this: using the same ...
2
votes
4answers
488 views

Can I write “ The bag is black colour?”

We know that "The bag is black." is a correct sentence. But, a lot of people write "the bag is black colour". Is this sentence grammatically wrong or acceptable?
0
votes
2answers
51 views

Recordkeeping, record keeping, or record-keeping

In the following sentence, a reviewer claimed that record keeping is a spelling error that should be corrected to recordkeeping. Service providers shall manage information using agreed upon ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

Is “'the most tawdry’ race-baiting” ungrammatical?

When I was transcribing the following sentence of Time magazine’s (September 1st issue) article ’”The Tragedy of Ferguson”; “We elected a black man with a Muslim name to be President. What other ...
11
votes
7answers
1k views

What part of speech is “telling” in “that would be telling”?

In the phrase "that would be telling", what is the word "telling"? I think it would be either an adjective or a verb, but which is it? Neither seems to be obviously wrong. I think the former would ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

A question to ask about birth rank or serial number [duplicate]

Are you the third of your parents' children? or the second issue? Or, you are the third guy, eh? What is the question for which "he came third in the race" is an answer?. Instead of resorting to ...
1
vote
2answers
145 views

“I am a legend” vs. “I am legend”

Which sentence makes sense, the first or the second? I am      legend. I am  a  legend.
1
vote
2answers
180 views

Can something be *slightly* critical? [duplicate]

I overheard someone at work describing a task as "quite critical", and then describe another task as (direct quote) "über critical". Forgetting for a minute the colloquial nature of the conversation, ...
0
votes
3answers
196 views

Recognizing right relative pronouns for clauses

I have read some grammar points about adjective clauses, but I still have problems recognizing the right choice in questions requiring them. A Jekyll and Hyde is a person who has two ...
3
votes
3answers
184 views

Problem in adjective clauses’ grammar

I have read some grammar points about adjective clauses, but I still have problems recognizing the right choice in questions requiring them. For example: All the students ____ do well in writing. ...
4
votes
0answers
136 views

Are there nouns that embody adjectives+verbs? (Not asking about attributive nouns) [closed]

I'm not sure if there's a better way for me to word my question. I've sorted through "noun" + "adjective" search results here on SE, but found nothing approximating what I'm after. I'm trying to ...
2
votes
3answers
173 views

Can “erudite” be used to describe things other than humans?

I have heard the adjective erudite in relation to humans, but I was inditing an essay and pondering whether I could implement it to describe a school. An erudite school. Is that permissible?
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Is a phrase 'your happy being' correct?

My friend asked me to the beach by a sentence; 'The beach is waiting for your happy being.' Is the sentence he used correct?
1
vote
1answer
56 views

The recognition of the word “Enough”

I came across a sentence and had bugged me ever since. I cannot identify whether the word "Enough" is an adjective, a pronoun, a determiner or an adverb although I highly suspect that is an adjective ...
2
votes
4answers
300 views

What is the difference between “graphic” and “graphical” as adjectives?

Are the two adjectives completely interchangeable, or is there a distinction between them? Does it matter which I choose?
3
votes
1answer
110 views

Is a determiner considered an adjective or a separate part?

I came across some blogs which states that determiners are types of adjectives (according to traditional grammar), whereas wiki (which I do not entirely trust) indicates some key differences. after ...
0
votes
2answers
119 views

Is this right: “the whole France”?

I am not sure if this phrase is right: “for the whole France”. Here's the context: Sam applied these methods successfully at some sites in France and then was extended for the whole France by ...
4
votes
3answers
465 views

Comparative or superlative to describe a quality of a member of a set of two things?

For example, 'he's the bigger of the two guards' or 'he's the biggest of the two guards'? The comparative indicates that something is bigger/more difficult than another member. If there's only two ...
0
votes
3answers
138 views

“I want [pronoun] [adjective]” vs “I want [pronoun] to be [adjective]”

Take these two sentences. 1.I want him dead. 2.I want him to be dead. What is the differences between two sentences? What does the "to be" mean?
15
votes
6answers
3k views

Using “so” and “very” for ungradable adjectives

We generally use modifiers such as "so" and "very" for gradable/normal adjectives (water can be quite/so/very HOT, but not quite/so/very BOILING (an ungradable/extreme adjective). Yet would you say ...
1
vote
1answer
125 views

Are commas necessary between coordinate adjectives? [duplicate]

to reach a mutually-agreed long-term comprehensive solution that would ensure Iranˈs nuclear program will be exclusively peaceful. As I see, in the noun phrase a mutually-agreed long-term ...
1
vote
4answers
89 views

Quick or Quickly: “How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy” [duplicate]

Let’s say I have this title: How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy Should I say quick and easy or quickly and easily? Why?
2
votes
2answers
259 views

determiner “the” followed by adjective - parts of speech

In English, adjectives usually cannot function as noun or pronouns, at least not to the degree it is possible in German where you can do it without thinking. The old car sucked. The new is better. ...
4
votes
2answers
643 views

What part of speech is the word “found” in the sentence below

A whale found dead on the southern Spanish coast was found to have swallowed 17 kg of plastic waste, including plastic bags. I assumed it was a verb, as in a reduced passive form (a whale that was ...
11
votes
5answers
1k views

“physically attractive” vs. “attractive physically”

I have come across the following sentence in a dictionary: Though not very attractive physically, she possessed a good sense of humour. I think the adverb "physically" postmodifies the ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
0
votes
1answer
481 views

Usage of “other” with singular nouns

Reading an English textbook and learning stuff, they mention that that "other" is used only with plural or uncountable nouns. But what about this? There is no other way..no other option. Car ends ...
0
votes
1answer
154 views

Which can be true? The importance of + Ving or the importance of + ADJ + Noun

I am confused about the sentence below. Which structure is used: importance of + Ving or the importance of + ADJ + Noun ? In recently years, there has been growing awareness of the importance of ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

Can “Apple” be an adjective? [duplicate]

What role is the word "apple" playing in the sentence "I ate the apple pie." Is apple an adjective? Or are apple and pie treated together as one noun. Is this true of all words used like this? Can ...
-2
votes
3answers
7k views

Alternative to the incorrect “I'm doing great”?

Since 'great' is an adjective, "I'm doing great" seems to be incorrect. It should be: "I'm doing (adverb)." You could say "I'm doing well." Could you also say "I'm doing greatly."?
3
votes
2answers
271 views

What's the logic behind adjectives constructed with a hyphen?

I'll give you a lovecraftian stanza: Thro’ the ghoul-guarded gateways of slumber, Past the wan-moon’d abysses of night, I have liv’d o’er my lives without number, I have sounded all things ...
0
votes
2answers
335 views

What's the difference between “She came home angry” and “She came home angrily” [closed]

Are these two sentences grammatically correct? What's the difference between them? She came home angry She came home angrily
0
votes
1answer
487 views

Can “above” be used as an adjective? [duplicate]

I've read in some English grammar books that the word above can only act as an adverb. It can never be used as an adjective in any context. For example: 1) The above example explains it well. ...
0
votes
2answers
372 views

multiple adjectives next to each other [closed]

In low volume, a melody sad love song is playing in a mobile phone placed on the side table. Do you see the three adjectives (melody sad love) together? Is that correct?
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “I'm being angry” ungrammatical?

I am arguing with friends about this question. According to what I learned in school, there are some adjectives that cannot be used in the progressive form. I think this one is ungrammatical because ...
-1
votes
2answers
166 views

Using “meantime” as an adjective

Does it make sense to say: Please consider this email as a meantime brief report. If yes, why? and if no, how can it be fixed? Edit By the above sentence, I want to say that this email is not ...
-6
votes
1answer
113 views

“Bongo is screaming”: is “screaming” an adjective? [closed]

If I say, "Bongo is screaming", would screaming be an adjective?
2
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between “skilled” and “skillful”?

What is the difference between skilled and skillful? When can I use one, when can I used the other? He is skilled/​skillful. He is a skilled/​skillful musician. (Anything else?) From the ...
1
vote
2answers
326 views

Which of these is the correct use of this phrase

I frequently encounter this in technical documents and I am wondering which one is correct. In the figure below or In the below figure
2
votes
0answers
33 views

Is the phrase “fresh six muffins” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the rule for adjective order? A non-native speaker that I know always puts the count before another adjective, as in "fresh six muffins". "Six fresh muffins" ...
1
vote
1answer
586 views

How to identify adjectives [closed]

I’m revisiting/studying about adjectives in “Adjectives” at Capital Community College Guide to Grammar and Writing. First I learn that articles are adjectives, but then there follows a paragraph in ...
35
votes
5answers
4k views

Is “the girls are want to gossip” correct?

Is this the correct use and placement of want? The girls in the office are want to gossip. Does anyone have a reference citing this use?
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Word for the “strength” of an adjective

Is there a word which describes the strength of an adjective within an ordered set? For example, these words describe “quality” in ascending order of their “power”: good great fantastic Is there ...
6
votes
5answers
2k views

Use of determiners as adjectives

In a grammar book that I'm reading, an adjective is defined as: A word that modifies a noun or a pronoun. (To modify is to limit or point out or describe: that book; another chance; the blue ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“Super-duper ultra mega”

Can I use the adjectives super-duper, ultra, and mega in one adjective? For example, A super-duper ultra mega huge dome.
0
votes
1answer
331 views

Can the word 'freed' be used as an adjective? [closed]

For example: "Freed memory can be reused by another computer programs"?
2
votes
1answer
356 views

What's it called when you make an adjective post-positive? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify? In English, adjectives usually precede the nouns they describe, as in "organic carrots". However, in some cases ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify?

Right now I can only think of one instance in which this regularly occurs. The adjective proper is sometimes placed after the noun it modifies, e.g: Reptilia: A class of cold-blooded oviparous or ...
1
vote
2answers
14k views

How to use the words ending with “-ly”?

First question: in the grammar world, where do the -ly ended words belong? Second question: how to use them correctly? Rarely (oops!), if ever, I get myself using -ly ended words in my writing. I'm ...
5
votes
3answers
719 views

Adjectives that do not have predicative position

I've read somewhere that some adjectives cannot be used in the predicative position; for example "this is a major problem" is acceptable, but "the problem is major" is not acceptable. I'm wondering ...