This tag is about how the grammar works: different grammatical usages, how they can be used, or what they mean.

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3answers
43 views

Grammar point around the word 'apropos'

I found a couple examples with that word: The song feels apropos to a midnight jaunt Clothes that are apropos to the occasion I'm interested in can we use that following the verb of action. ...
0
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0answers
36 views

When should I use “a” versus “an” in front of a word beginning with the letter S? [duplicate]

I know that in front of a vowel, but in front of the letter S I don´t remamber.
0
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0answers
22 views

Singular or plural verbs with idioms that start with singular articles [duplicate]

I wonder which verb form, singular or plural, is grammatically correct in the following sentence: "Education and welfare is/are a matter of concern to us."
0
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0answers
28 views

Grammar help - Any books? Audio books? [on hold]

Any way to improve my grammar? The more I read, the more it sounds stupid. This question is probably sounding off too.
-2
votes
1answer
44 views

What is the difference between “until before recently” and “until recently” and how to use these phrases correctly?

I have seen usages of "until before recently" with different tenses like simple past, present perfect and past perfect. Can you give a number of correct usage examples for this phrase? And what is the ...
-1
votes
2answers
30 views

Which is more correct: Do you wish to see the pictures? or Would you like to see the pictures? [on hold]

which is more correct: do you wish to see the pictures? or would you like to see the pictures?
1
vote
1answer
48 views

He/she “can’t” or “couldn’t” be with us today?

I have often heard the phrase “He couldn’t be with us today”. However, this seems contradictory because “today” is in the present, but “couldn’t” is past tense (or subjunctive, but the sentence is ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

do you use a comma when telling/asking people/things? [duplicate]

do you use a comma when telling/asking people/things? For example(s) Do you want to go eat tomorrow, Nathan? Check me out, Nathan. Commas, people, commas! Just sent you a message, Nathan. Just sent ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

Grammar improvement in a sentence

My teacher gave me a worksheet today. I found a sentence saying: The main character and the novelist, who serves as the narrator, share a vital experience. This I found confusing, because the ...
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2answers
41 views

“List up to three”, so I can put in only two? [on hold]

It says: Please list up to three projects (in order of preference) you are interested in. So I am not sure: Do I have to put in exactly three projects or can I also just put in two?
0
votes
2answers
70 views

Can “he don't” be right in any case? [duplicate]

I know the grammatical correct way is he doesn't but I have seen many people saying don't with singular subjects, is there any case where it's correct. I am just learning, please ignore my mistakes ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

What is the difference “same with” and “same to”?

Which one is correct or preferred? 1. "same with above" 2. "same to above" If both are correct what is the difference between them?
-1
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0answers
30 views

which one is best i'll go with you or i'll come with you? [on hold]

which one is best? I'll come with you or I'll go with you.
2
votes
2answers
36 views

Need help to understand job ad eligibility criteria

I want to apply for a researcher position. This is the homepage I am refering to. Now I have serious trouble to understand this part of the eligibility criteria: Early-Stage Researchers will, at ...
0
votes
2answers
62 views

Are idioms impervious to grammatical rules?

I heard someone on the radio this morning who was talking about some interest rate say, "[such and such an interest rate] will remain at one point two percent, in other words: low." Since "low" is ...
0
votes
3answers
64 views

Can we use the preposition “for” with the verb “scoot”?

I checked the dictionary and found that I can use 'scoot' with 'off' or 'over' but can I use it with 'for'? Example: Kalya got out of bed and scooted for the toilet
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0answers
26 views

Add “the” before “of” [migrated]

I am confused with the usage of "the" before an of". City of Pain A City of Sadness Why the first example does not add "a" or "the" before the word "city"? Actually, the first one is a ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

“hereby referred to” or “hereafter referred to”? [on hold]

In a document where I would like to change how something is referred to, which would be the correct sentence? The variable x hereby referred to as a... The variable x hereafter referred to as ...
3
votes
2answers
67 views

what's the difference between “important to” and “important for”?

When do we use important for and important to? What's the rule? For example: It's important to me. Or It's important for me. What's the difference between the two sentences?
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0answers
31 views

Phrases and clauses, what are they both? [on hold]

What do you call the category of sentence component that contains both clauses and phrases?
-2
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0answers
22 views

The question is. How would this affect my chances of a book deal with a Publisher in the future’? [on hold]

Preferring to peddle my Science Fiction manuscript to a Literary agent, may well be an impossible dream. In which case I feel that whilst I’m considering that option however remote it may be. I might ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

“there's no story behind this (pict) to be told” is it right?

is it right if i write "There's no story behind this (picture) to be told"? thanks.
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Would you say “is” or “are” in this sentence? [on hold]

Would you say "is" or "are" in this sentence? "His talent, combined with his personality, is/are attractive."
2
votes
0answers
85 views

Can “nothing” be a direct object? [migrated]

In the sentence: "The boy kicked the ball," the ball is obviously the direct object. A student asked me if the sentence were changed to "The boy kicked nothing," is nothing also a direct object?
0
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0answers
39 views

Relative and demonstrative pronouns “that” and “those”

I think the sentence the difference between the behaviour of young people today and that of those in the past is correct, as that (relative pronoun) replaces behaviour and those (demonstrative ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Can you begin a sentence with 'It's because…'

Someone I work with in an ESL setting is using "It's because..." to begin his sentences and I believe it doesn't sound natural. I am aware that he should be using 'because' to join the sentences but ...
2
votes
0answers
270 views

Which comes first? Grammar or language? [migrated]

I always have the impression grammar is just a tool to help studying and learning a language, i.e. it is a scientific tool invented for a language after the language has existed. But to think of it ...
2
votes
2answers
111 views

Simple explanation of the many functional uses of 'should'?

[User John Lawler]: So how many named special cases of each modal verb are there, in toto? There's 1. subjunctive should, and 2. mandative should, and 3. putative should, at least; and I ...
3
votes
1answer
63 views

Is it correct to say “Best Regards”? [on hold]

This is my gmail email signature Best Regards, Rory Recently it's started to bother me. I feel it might be improper english. Is it? Is it an acceptable sign off?
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Is it correct to say “We […] will be present at <destiny> at <time> […]”?

I am writting an email in English for a website. As you can see, my English isn't quite perfect. And one of the emails must be saying something similar to: We confirm that we will be present at ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Is “to one of the most genuine people I know” correct? [duplicate]

I am confused if I should use persons or people. Persons sounds weird to me.
0
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0answers
8 views

pharaoh was thought he was devine [migrated]

The funerals of Egyptian rulers were spectacular – while in Mesopotamia kings were regarded as the servants of the gods, in Egypt the pharaoh was thought he was divine. One of the highlighted parts ...
0
votes
2answers
101 views

that vs which vs what [duplicate]

Which sentence would you use more, which is just simple wrong and why? This is the speech, that my father wrote. This is the speech, which my father wrote. This is the speech, what my father wrote. ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Does it sound natural to you? [closed]

Is this sentence grammatically correct? As I understand, the new implementation is scheduled to go live in 7 days which seems a little unrealistic.
0
votes
2answers
36 views

optimum answer to do you often [on hold]

Can you please clarify for me which is the correct answer to the following question: Do you often have visitors? a. Yes, pretty much every day b. Yes, quite often c. Not very often.
0
votes
1answer
17 views

the names of (plural) or the name of (plural) [on hold]

I'm wondering which option is correct: 1) we will have the name of the people who play on this team. 2) we will have the names of the people who play on this team. Should 'name' be plural or ...
1
vote
2answers
114 views

“Lying supine” vs. “supine”

Is it natural to say "lying supine"? The word supine, by definition, already suggests lying [See: http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/supine]. However, I was just confused because one of the ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

'whereabouts' is / are

If the sense is plural, I believe we'd use 'whereabouts are', as in 'Their whereabouts are unknown.' If the sense is singular, we'd use 'whereabouts is', as in 'His whereabouts is unknown.' Can this ...
0
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0answers
28 views

Is the 'unmarked'/standard/basic form called the oblique/objective case?

[Source:] This happens because what linguists would call the “unmarked” or standard, basic form for pronouns turns out to be the objective form—me, him, her, them, and the like. This is the form ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

alternatives to “bucket list of kate”

I want to say: "kate's bucket list" but we need to have "kate" at the end of the sentence (that is the requirement). So I thought of "bucket list of kate" but it sounded a bit.... I don't know... bad ...
0
votes
3answers
49 views

Let's you and I / me be fair with each other

"Let's you and I / me be fair with each other." "Let you and I / me indulge in a little bit of reverie." Is "I" or "me" correct in those sentences? And why?
0
votes
2answers
50 views

“allow insertion” or “allow inserting” or “allow to insert” [duplicate]

I have some doubts about using ing-verb in the following case: Such data structures don't allow insretion/inserting/to insert any kind of objects. Is it considered grammatically correct to say ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Weird “genitive of relative pronoun” construction

In this youtube-video a non native speaker of English said the following sentence ... another verb, of which I've already talked about the present tense At first, I thought it was simply a ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

the Virginia public school district

Do I have to put "the" in front of "Virginia"? Thanks. Do disciplinary school removal rates differ between high and low poverty schools in Virginia public school district?
-1
votes
0answers
14 views

my colleague insists [duplicate]

My colleague insists point no. 1 is correct. We, however disagree. Kindly explain which is correct and why. If he is wrong, do explain why point no. 1 is wrong. Thanks.. 1- My main concern is these ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Shall. I use a preposition here? [on hold]

which one is correct? We had a very small marriage ceremony where only close relatives and friends were invited. Or We had a very small marriage ceremony where only close relatives and ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

What phrase could take place “far better than”? [closed]

When I tried to say product A is far better than product B, what phrase could be used to express my love towards product A? Can I see A kick B' s ass ?
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Show interest in job position and ask about status of the application? [closed]

In an e-mail I want to ask about the status of my application. Furthermore in a short I want to express that I am very interested in this position, since it is ideal for me. So I write: Since it ...
1
vote
2answers
48 views

Why is the British tv show “the Undatables” not called “the Undatable” without 's'?

There is a tv series on Channel 4 called "The Undatables" which I have just started watching. The title keeps me wondering why it's not just called "the undatable" like the poor or the rich? Last ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Is the phrase “has got” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Does "Mary's Got Talent" mean "Mary Has Got Talent"? Is "has got" grammatically correct in this instance?