A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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3answers
36 views

When to use the gerund form of a verb after “to”?

I would like to understand when to use the gerund form of a verb after "to." I had in my mind that every verb used after "to" was in its infinitive form, like for example: It is hard to play the ...
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0answers
16 views

'lead to someone doing something' OR 'lead to someone's doing something'

Under the entry lead (v.), Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English (5th edition) lists: lead to someone doing something example: His actions could lead to him losing his job. However, ...
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1answer
32 views

Difference between using a gerund and using to + verb root

As an objective (or subjective). "Being a teacher" vs "to be a teacher". What is the difference between gerund and 'to' + verb root ? My dream is being a teacher. My dream is to be a teacher.
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3answers
4k views

Is there a single-word noun for an overwhelming feeling that uses “overwhelm” as its root?

Is there a single-word noun for an overwhelming feeling that uses overwhelm as its root? My first thought was to make a gerund, that is, overwhelming. Although overwhelming is normally used as an ...
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5answers
38k views

“Plan to do” vs. “plan on doing”

What are the differences between the following? He is planning to do something. He is planning on doing something. When to use each?
0
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1answer
37 views

Is the gerund correct with “whether”? [closed]

After pressing it shows a message box asking whether the user wants to take a picture with the device, or better attaching a picture from the device's gallery. I am not sure about the gerund or ...
2
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2answers
82 views

Question about the details in meaning between gerund and to-infinite

Consider the following multiple-choice question: The supervisors were asked ______ tasks to new employees so that they could be trained to do them properly. A. Delegate - infinitive B. To ...
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0answers
57 views

What is the correct answer - “Opening” or “Open”? [migrated]

In the proofreading part of my test paper, I wrote "Opening at the same time as the school, the library is an important place." But the answer was "Open at the same time as the school, the ...
-1
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0answers
11 views

Aiming/aimed. What's the right answer? [duplicate]

Campaigns aiming/aimed at kids. What's the correct answer and why? I saw the idea that 'campaigns' do sth. So it's active time. Thus it should be 'aiming'. But I'm not sure. I've tried to find it ...
1
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2answers
298 views

Dedicated to producing vs dedicated to the production - use of gerund in place of noun

- A factory famous for the production of. . . - A factory famous for producing . . . - A farm dedicated to the cultivation of . . . - A farm dedicated to cultivating . . . - The firm focused on the ...
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2answers
65 views

usage of for/ to/ gerund

In this sentence: She had a strange belief that laws are in existence for being violated. Which of these is correct: She had a strange belief that laws are in existence for to be ...
0
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1answer
42 views

Parallelism in a sentence regarding transitive verbs, gerunds, and objects

I'm trying to write this sentence, but something doesn't seem right: Walloopp.com is the place to discover, collaborate, and create what's next. The first two are just options for actions on the ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Use of -ing in certain sentences [closed]

The following sentence is very common in employment and reply letters: I look forward to hearing from you soon. I wonder why "to hear" must not/cannot be used instead. What's the rule behind the ...
1
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2answers
59 views

Participial as adverbial?

''Solve the questions using what I have taught you.'' ''He showed up wearing a suit.'' ''It is doing a nice job covering up the broken chair.'' ''I broke the law getting you out of jail.'' ''You were ...
0
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0answers
40 views

Gerund vs noun— which to use in title

This issue of gerunds vs noun always puzzled me and in this particular case made me wonder. I actually am translating my thesis title into English and am not sure as to use gerund or noun. So which ...
0
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1answer
63 views

Infinitive instead of gerund, specifically after 'require'

I use Grammarly Chrome extension to validate my texts in English. And with some sentences I keep seeing the error message "Infinitive instead of gerund". I'm not sure if this is an appropriate error ...
19
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2answers
4k views

How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive?

As a native speaker of English, the gerund version of this sentence sounds better: infinitive: When used together in chains, extension methods are an unprecedented tool to produce extremely ...
0
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2answers
505 views

To see them play and to see them playing

Excuse my limited acquaintance on English usage; which sentence is grammatically correct, and if any, which meaning do they convey to ? I saw them play chess. I saw then playing chess. Many ...
0
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1answer
81 views

Gerund after “ways to”

I'm writing a paper with a colleague and we are unsure if the grammar in our title is correct. I'd like to go with this variant. Multiple Ways to Measuring Alertness My colleague asks if we ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Gerund before prepositions [closed]

I read a sentence like this Negotiating for dummies I know that a gerund is after a preposition, so why in this sentence a gerund "Negotiating" is before a preposition "for" Thanks for reading
0
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0answers
28 views

Gerund (help doing/help in doing)

I know that in this sentence we should use ing form (this sentence is an example from test with given answer), but according to dictionaries we should use help in doing something, so why we ommit the ...
0
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1answer
66 views

Participle and gerund [duplicate]

Barking dogs seldom bite. Barking is a gerund or present participle? His rising early in the morning, helped him score well. His rising early in the morning -- is this a participle clause? Can ...
1
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0answers
40 views

“I understand him going back there” [duplicate]

I heard a sportscaster say this. Since gerunds are preceded by possessive pronouns, this would have to be a present participle. (him, who is going back). I do think, however, that the gerund (his ...
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4answers
1k views

Usage of the gerund preceded by the possessive adjective/determiner?

I read this thread on the usage of the gerund preceded by the possessive adjective/determiner with much interest. I have another question about the usage of the gerund preceded by the possessive ...
38
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4answers
15k views

When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive adjective/determiner?

I assume that the following sentences are grammatically correct: He resents your being more popular than he is. Most of the members paid their dues without my asking them. They objected ...
0
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3answers
53 views

Is the word “beginning” here a gerund or a present participle? [duplicate]

Is the word "beginning" here a gerund or a present participle, and why? On June 22, 1941, the armies of Nazi Germany crossed the Soviet border, beginning a war that would claim the lives of millions ...
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0answers
74 views

Is double “l” found in British or American English [closed]

...or why Word 2013, Chrome and other computer programs has this exactly opposite? Nearly every answer and comment to this question clearly states, that double "l" is found in British English (with ...
13
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4answers
45k views

“I like to do (be) something” vs “I like doing (being) something”

This is what I read in an answer to a previous question: Verbs Followed by Either Gerund or Infinitive Sometimes the meaning changes according to the verb used. <…> (dis)like ...
6
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3answers
19k views

“Stop working” vs “stopped to work”

I want to know, is there any difference between "stop + v.(ing)" and "stopped to + v.". These are example sentences. I stop working for a month. vs I stopped to work for a month. I stop watching ...
4
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3answers
633 views

“Spell check” vs. “spelling check”

I can't remember the exact place I saw this (but I believe it was on another StackExchange site), but when someone was commenting on a software's "spell check" function, they said something to the ...
8
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3answers
2k views

Help identifying an error type “tried to help me learning”

I have a friend from Russia who is trying to learn English and recently used the sentence "He tried to help me learning..." (implied: the English language) It is obviously wrong and I corrected it ...
0
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0answers
38 views

Need help with formation of this title

I am going to write my bachelor paper about how I am going to extend CASE tool transformation of integrity constrains from logical model to physical schema. I am not sure if it is relevant, but my ...
4
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1answer
133 views

Is “programming” not a noun?

Recently, I was told that the word "programming" in the phrase "programming thoughts" is a verb in the gerund-participle form and that the term "gerund" by itself is obsolete in modern grammar. I was ...
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1answer
34 views

Is a deverbal noun with at least two adjectives plural, or can it be?

Is a deverbal noun with at least two adjectives plural, or can it be? An example sentence (from research regarding medical monitoring of vital signs): Continuous and automated monitoring is... ...
0
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0answers
26 views

Singular or plural verb with gerund + 3rd person? [duplicate]

Could you please comment the following phrases? Which one is correct (if any)? We believe that having such experience increases your credibility. We believe that having such experience ...
1
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1answer
49 views

Mass measuring vs Measuring mass

I have a table of Measuring Equipment, which is NOT in English. There is a column called Parameter Measured, where the following is specified: Refractive index measuring Mass Measuring Optical ...
6
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2answers
9k views

Can a prepositional phrase be the direct object?

We're covering grammar in English I, and we just got to gerunds. In one of the exercises, I had the sentence "Pilgrims learned about planting crops from the Wampanoags." I'm supposed to find the ...
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3answers
9k views

When is it acceptable to start a sentence with an “-ing” word?

Here's my example. It is a sentence that begins in the middle of a paragraph and I'm using it as a transition. "Living in Costa Rica also gave me the opportunity to interact with the local ...
1
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1answer
59 views

Can I say “I am glad hearing from you” or it is wrong? [closed]

I am glad hearing from you. Is it correct? And does it have a real meaning or it doesn't?
1
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1answer
68 views

Can I use a noun phrase with “after” or “before” to talk about specific past events or “past perfect” is required?

I know that gerunds can be used with before or after in the present tense when talking about facts: I always turn off the lights before going to bed. But can I use a gerund with "after" or ...
2
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1answer
106 views

Subject Verb Possessive Gerund problem: “He had me do this” vs “He had my doing this”

I know this sounds awkward, but in sentences such as "He said me being here was wonderful," it's obviously grammatically incorrect to say "me being here." It should be "my being" because we need to ...
3
votes
2answers
115 views

Nobody was surprised at John being absent (present participle or gerund?)

Some time ago I learned the difference between Present Participle and Gerund and today I decided to pass any online test to make sure I get it. So, I passed it having made the only mistake which is ...
4
votes
2answers
157 views

Indirect objects that answer the question “by whom”

Here is a sentence from Chapter Seventeen of Huckleberry Finn. The sentence appears in a grammar worksheet: When I got to the three log doorsteps I heard them unlocking and unbarring and ...
18
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3answers
7k views

Does a gerund always end with -ing? If so, why?

After asking what the difference is between a gerund and a participle, I began to wonder if all gerunds end with -ing, since I couldn't think of any that didn't. If they do, why?
0
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0answers
26 views

“come out”: Verb + ING or To + Verb, and why? [duplicate]

Is "being" in the right form in the sentence below? A lot of such things come out being very, very overvalued or is it... A lot of such things come out to be very, very overvalued
2
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2answers
120 views

Difference between gerund and present participle [duplicate]

What is the difference between a gerund and present participle? When should we use a gerund and when should we use a present participle ?
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2answers
103 views

“Forget” followed by a gerund [closed]

Since "forget" followed by a gerund refers to the past, which one of the following sentences is correct? " I forgot to lock the door." "I forget locking the door." "I forget having ...
4
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4answers
9k views

Singular vs. Plural with Multiple Gerunds as Subject (IE: [Gerund] and [Gerund] are/is [something].)

I'm trying to find out whether I should use a singular or plural verb when there are multiple gerunds as the subject of the sentence. For example: Running the correct course and keeping a steady ...
1
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1answer
285 views

“-ing” verb + gerund

I am aware that some verbs require the use of a gerund in certain constructions like "to avoid doing something". However, does this rule extend to the case that avoid is also used in an -ing form? ...
2
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3answers
98 views

Main verb in a sentence and gerund

In the sentence "Offering her license and registration, Selena sobbed in the driver's seat," offering is not a gerund, right? It isn't a noun and does not act as a subject. That made me wonder if the ...