A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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2answers
122 views

Dedicated to producing vs dedicated to the production - use of gerund in place of noun

- A factory famous for the production of. . . - A factory famous for producing . . . - A farm dedicated to the cultivation of . . . - A farm dedicated to cultivating . . . - The firm focused on the ...
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1answer
45 views

“talk” vs. “talking” – which sentence is correct? [closed]

1) He used to stop talking so that he could drink his beer, and then he continued his talking. 2) He used to stop talking so that he could drink his beer, and then he continued his talk. Can you ...
0
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1answer
32 views

Understanding X/Understanding *of* X: What's the distinction?

Say we have two sentences that use understanding as a gerund: Understanding how to open this door is crucial in the event of an emergency. My understanding of physics is woefully inadequate. ...
0
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1answer
64 views

Gerund usage: when can verbs be used as -ing nouns? [duplicate]

I have a question regarding the correct usage of verbs as nouns ending in -ing (I understand that these are referred to as gerunds). Under what circumstance may a gerund be used in place of the verb ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Object pronouns+verbs+ing

As non native speaker of English , I'm having trouble making sense of a structure pertaining to object pronouns. Likelihood of me doing this.... Your plan involves me attempting to prepare ...
1
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2answers
31 views

“predicting” or “prediction of”?

What is the difference between "can be used for prediction of user behaviour" and "can be used for predicting user behaviour"? I like the second version more since it's shorter and without a ...
0
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2answers
34 views

Gerund Separate Words

My friend and I have been debating if adding 'ing' to a word makes it its own word. We said Webster would be the final answer for the debate. A search on Webster though brought back the root word as ...
2
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1answer
34 views

Possessive followed by negative gerund

Is it correct to say this? Her not paying attention to the class annoys me.
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2answers
35 views

Is there a form and/or synonym of the gerund “spelling” that can be put into an adverb position such as that of “grammatically”?

That is, how would I go about converting the word "spelling" (as in the spelling of a word) to an adverb that actually sounds right in the blank of "_____-inept"? I'm pretty sure "spellingly" isn't a ...
1
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1answer
62 views

In what (semantic) context might “REFUSE” be used with a gerund complement?

I know that, prescriptively speaking, that the verb "refuse" is supposed to be followed by an infinitive. For example: The parents refused to buy the dangerous toy for their kid. Since language ...
1
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1answer
55 views

“Informing” — Gerund instead of Verb+Object?

I think if we take informing as a noun in this sentence, it should be fine. What are your views on the grammaticality of the following sentence? He left me without informing.
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4answers
2k views

Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
1
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2answers
49 views

devote herself to caring for poor people vs. devote herself to care for poor people [duplicate]

I came across the following multiple-choice question: She devoted herself to ( ) for poor people. The choices are: caring care be caring have cared As the preposition "to" can be ...
1
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2answers
281 views

Problem with gerunds

I'm a non-native English speaker and have recently come across a phrase, also written by a non-native English speaker, that puzzled me: Automatic creating tasks (this is the name of a software ...
0
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1answer
55 views

What is the word for a past-tense verb used like a gerund?

In a comment on this answer to a similar question, the user Kris identifies the concept of "a member of a class to which gerunds belong but itself [is] not a gerund." Is there a word for such a thing? ...
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2answers
101 views

A gerund or use a regular noun?

Which of these is correct or more natural? One of my greatest strengths is critically analyzing. One of my greatest strengths is critical analyzing. One of my greatest strengths is ...
1
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4answers
107 views

“spent a lot of time to shop” vs. “spent a lot of time shopping”

She spends a lot of time to shop. She spends a lot of time shopping. Are both of these sentences grammatically correct and do they have the same meaning?
1
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1answer
96 views

“spent a lot of money to buy a house” vs. “spent a lot of money buying a house”

He spent a lot of money to buy a house. He spent a lot of money buying a house. In my head both of the sentences are correct. What's the difference between these sentences?
6
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6answers
15k views

-ing vs -in' ending

I wonder if the "g" in the -ing forms is pronounced. When I hear it it seems as if it's not pronounced sometimes or just slightly, though sometimes I've been told that I should pronounce "g" for ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

“For [verb]ing” vs “to [verb]”

Someone edited my message on StackOverflow, but it really bugs me out. I'm not sure what's wrong with it: As you see, the bigger the circle becomes, the more vertices I need for hiding the straight ...
1
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1answer
69 views

Simple or perfect form of gerund [closed]

I just wondering if the meaning of the following sentences are equivalent? I know the difference between past and perfect tenses. So I'm just trying to ask if I can use first sentence instead of the ...
7
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5answers
528 views

Cooking apples and cleaning ladies

Consider the following sentences: Cooking is my favourite activity. Cooking apples are essential for this recipe. Cooking functions in the first sentence as a gerund. How does it function in the ...
2
votes
4answers
694 views

Can I use the word “promise” with gerund?

Is it possible to use gerund after the verb "promise"? For example, in the sentence "He promised cleaning the window. I'd prefer to say: He promised to clean the window. But today I was told that this ...
0
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0answers
57 views

Why is gerund not used in this sentence?

I read a sentence in Fox news: "If they are able to exploit it, that is say break it open and potentially analyze it and categorize it this will give them a great deal of information about how ...
0
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0answers
47 views

Gerunds - Should they be a word class of their own? [duplicate]

I'm a bit astonished about the long discussions in the post How can I prove a word is a noun? I admit that there a certain problems, especially with gerunds. Smoking cigarettes is unhealty. In ...
7
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3answers
830 views

What is a gerund? A noun or a verb? 'His smoking upset me’

I've been studying the Huddleston and Pullum book for four months now. So far only one thing confuses me: the identity of gerund. Is it a noun or a verb? His constant smoking upset me. smoking ...
2
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2answers
84 views

What's the plural of “picking up”?

I'm writing in the context of ice skating. This is the sentence I wish to construct: There will be many falls, but serious injuries are rare, and picking ups are easy. "picking up" is the ...
0
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1answer
56 views

Temporal Clause for Past Participle

I was wondering if there is a difference between reduced temporal clause with gerund and reduced temporal clause with past participle, and which one is used in formal setting? For example: Sentence ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Subject of gerund phrase [duplicate]

Me getting a hangover is nothing like her getting a hangover. - I'd rather contemplate you singing than him singing. Is this grammatically correct?
30
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2answers
8k views

When is “L” doubled?

Some verbs can have double Ls in the gerund form; for example: modeling; modelling traveling; travelling Which form should we use, or which form is used more in the literature?
23
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4answers
12k views

When should a verb be followed by a gerund instead of an infinitive?

Some verbs are followed by ing, e.g. I enjoy swimming. We can't say I enjoy to swim. Likewise, some verbs are followed by to, e.g. I decided to make a plan. Which particular verbs are followed by ...
0
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1answer
82 views

Gerund vs infinitive paraphrase

Is there any difference between these two sentences: "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, discouraging rich people from voting for them" "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, which discourages ...
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3answers
2k views

“Feel committed to [gerund/infinitive]”

Does "feel committed to" require an infinitive or gerund complement? For example, which of the following is grammatical? I feel committed to following up on that. I feel committed to follow ...
25
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4answers
3k views

The times they are a-changin'

I have always been intrigued by the word usage in the title of this Bob Dylan song. Wikipedia mentions that the song was influenced by Irish and Scottish ballads: Dylan recalled writing the song ...
17
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3answers
5k views

Does a gerund always end with -ing? If so, why?

After asking what the difference is between a gerund and a participle, I began to wonder if all gerunds end with -ing, since I couldn't think of any that didn't. If they do, why?
4
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1answer
137 views

Is there a better term for “perfect infinitive”, “perfect participle” or “perfect gerund”?

BACKGROUND There are grammar terms such as 'present perfect' and 'past perfect' as in: She has learned English for 10 years. [present perfect] She had learned English when she was little. ...
5
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2answers
2k views

Is “swimming” a gerund in “I went swimming”?

What is the function of swimming in the following sentence? I went swimming with some friends yesterday. Is swimming a gerund here? If it is, what is the grammatical function?
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0answers
79 views
27
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3answers
10k views

When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun?

I assume that the following sentences are grammatically correct: He resents your being more popular than he is. Most of the members paid their dues without my asking them. They objected ...
0
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1answer
102 views

What is difference between “using” and “by using”?

Sometimes both "using" and "by using" seem to have the same meaning. Am I wrong? For example, compare the sentences below: "On-screen keyboards allow people with mobility impairments to type data ...
3
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4answers
15k views

“Plan to do” vs. “plan on doing”

What are the differences between the following? He is planning to do something. He is planning on doing something. When to use each?
4
votes
3answers
543 views

progressive forms: participle or gerund?

Progressive forms of verbs consist of a form of to be + participle. At least that is what most English grammars say or they are imprecise and speak of ing-form. My question is what follows after the ...
0
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1answer
230 views

Clauses of purpose: “for + -ing” or "to-infinitive [duplicate]

In the following sentence, how should the clause of purpose be introduced? In addition to normal maintenance, there are additional costs associated with interventions that may be required to ...
0
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2answers
247 views

Adding “-ing” to a verb ending with a pronounced “e”

When a verb ends with a "e" that is pronounced, do you get rid of the "e" when you add "-ing"? For example, would you say "His karaoking last night was really unique", or "His karaokeing last night ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

How to use a gerund with 'my' in a sentence? [duplicate]

I am trying to say, "this led to my working as a research assistant with ...". I think something's awry in this phrase. Am I right?
1
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3answers
3k views

When is it acceptable to start a sentence with an “-ing” word?

Here's my example. It is a sentence that begins in the middle of a paragraph and I'm using it as a transition. "Living in Costa Rica also gave me the opportunity to interact with the local ...
38
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1answer
3k views

Origin of “-ing”

What is the origin of the suffix -ing used to form gerunds and present participles? Why is the suffix the same in both cases?
0
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0answers
34 views

possessive-before-gerund: “him sleeping with” or “his sleeping with”? [duplicate]

Did gypsies cut off man's penis in revenge for him sleeping with one of their girlfriends? Shouldn't that be his sleeping? Is the possessive-before-gerund rule still a rule on both sides of the ...
0
votes
3answers
169 views

Is Vouchering a valid synonym for “time booking” or not?

I have an ongoing dispute with someone who insists on using "Vouchering" in official documents as a synonym for "time booking" - (as in making entries on a time management system against booking ...
3
votes
8answers
1k views

How to remember the difference between: “Can you try to open” and “Can you try opening”?

I am well aware that a similar question has been asked in the past, namely “Try to save” or “try saving”. However, I am not totally satisfied by the posted answers. My problem is that, every time I ...