A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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2answers
1k views

Bare infinitive and gerund participle

I saw him kick the stone. According to my reference book this sentence is grammatically correct even though the verb 'kick' is in present tense while the action has already happened. If I write ...
6
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2answers
497 views

Referring to a gerund with a pronoun

Is it considered grammatical to refer to a gerund in the subject position with the pronoun "it"? Example: Visiting a dentist regularly is recommended as it can contribute to overall health.
2
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2answers
2k views

Using the gerund two times in a row

When you have this construct: . . . is a key factor in the making and controlling of the water. Should you leave only the last verb in the gerund: . . . is a key factor in the make and ...
2
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3answers
979 views

Progressive form required for “as”, “while”, etc.?

Are both forms grammatically correct? As I was entering the shop, I saw her. As I entered the shop, I saw her.
38
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1answer
3k views

Origin of “-ing”

What is the origin of the suffix -ing used to form gerunds and present participles? Why is the suffix the same in both cases?
3
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3answers
1k views

one's way of V-ing / one's way to V / a/the way of V-ing / a/the way to V

There are some options when you use the word way and some verb together: (1) a. There are some way of writing.       b. There are some way to write. Is there any ...
3
votes
2answers
197 views

Are expressions like “When studying, When playing, …” just expressions or something more?

My first question here. I am wondering whether expressions like the ones in the tittle are just expressions or represent another thing in the english language. I will give you some more examples so ...
2
votes
3answers
745 views

Which one should I use (“suggesting” or “to suggest”) in the example provided?

I can’t find anything suggesting that one cannot take out principle from Roth IRA account for education or housing purchases. Nor it’s indicated that money are doled out in a form of a loan. Part ...
4
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2answers
194 views

Is “a disclaiming” a gerund?

EDIT see end of question for updates: The question came up if this is proper English: Sorry, I felt the need for a disclaiming for some reason. And I think it is but some others say it isn't. ...
5
votes
4answers
903 views

Usage of the gerund preceded by the possessive pronoun

I read this thread on the usage of the gerund preceded by the possessive pronoun with much interest. I have another question about the usage of the gerund preceded by the possessive pronoun. In a ...
25
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4answers
3k views

The times they are a-changin'

I have always been intrigued by the word usage in the title of this Bob Dylan song. Wikipedia mentions that the song was influenced by Irish and Scottish ballads: Dylan recalled writing the song ...
25
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3answers
9k views

When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun?

I assume that the following sentences are grammatically correct: He resents your being more popular than he is. Most of the members paid their dues without my asking them. They objected ...
2
votes
3answers
836 views

Proper Usage of gerund form of the verb [closed]

So, I want to title a talk. Which of these is the right usage and why? "Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to solve them" OR "Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to ...
16
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2answers
3k views

How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive?

As a native speaker of English, the gerund version of this sentence sounds better: infinitive: When used together in chains, extension methods are an unprecedented tool to produce extremely ...
28
votes
2answers
8k views

When is “L” doubled?

Some verbs can have double Ls in the gerund form; for example: modeling; modelling traveling; travelling Which form should we use, or which form is used more in the literature?
23
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4answers
11k views

When should a verb be followed by a gerund instead of an infinitive?

Some verbs are followed by ing, e.g. I enjoy swimming. We can't say I enjoy to swim. Likewise, some verbs are followed by to, e.g. I decided to make a plan. Which particular verbs are followed by ...
27
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3answers
39k views

What's the difference between a gerund and a participle?

What is the difference between a gerund and a participle?