A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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1answer
335 views

Incorrect gerund to simple past conversion?

I'm a non-native speaker of English, so this might or might not be something very basic. Nonetheless, it's baffling me and I'd love some help. A friend of mine wrote this sentence in a story for ...
4
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2answers
1k views

Hyphen in the noun 'switching-off'? Or gerunds of compound verbs, more generally?

I'm currently proof-reading my girlfriend's Ph.D. thesis (neither of us are native speakers) and I came across the following sentence snippet: "the switching-off induces eddy currents", and the word '...
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3answers
329 views

Can the word 'formatting' be used as a noun?

Can the word formatting be used as a noun like in the following sentence: Consider the formatting of this JavaScript code... Or is it a gerund which should be used without an article: Consider ...
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2answers
510 views

“My” twice in a sentence

To settle a disagreement, is the following sentence grammatically correct? It's slowing my paying my debts off.
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2answers
107 views

Is this participle or gerund? [closed]

"Disturbed, she consulted her doctor about the symptoms."
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2answers
553 views

'engaged in developing' or 'engaged in the development of'?

XXX is engaged in developing and commercializing therapies for the treatment of Alzheimer's patients. or XXX is engaged in the development and commercialization of therapies for the ...
4
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2answers
642 views

Translating Gerunds from Spanish to English (verb+ing)

In Spanish, the gerund form (-ando, -endo) is frequently used adverbially to modify and describe the verb: El alma es dichosa dando y sirviendo. El niño anda bailando. El artista vive provocando ...
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1answer
758 views

verbs not followed by that clauses

Where can I find a list of verbs like 'to want', which must be followed by an infinitive (other verbs by a gerund), but cannot be followed by a that-clause? I got from your website that there are ...
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1answer
368 views

Difference between “is to do” and “is doing” [duplicate]

I saw below sentence: Her job is to clean the hall. So can I also say like: Her job is cleaning the hall. It's present participle or gerund? What's the different meaning between these two ...
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3answers
69 views

What does “a-building” modify? [duplicate]

"The city was a thousand years a-building." What does "a-building" (in building) modify in that sentence?
-1
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1answer
423 views

Compound verbs with infinitive and gerund [closed]

Which statements are grammatically correct and which meaning do they convey, This concept helps understand the problem. This concept helps to understand the problem. This concept helps understanding ...
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2answers
658 views

Should there be a gerund or a noun in front of the preposition?

(a) The rise of price of goods burdens the people. (b) The rising of price of goods burdens the people. (c) The ban of plastic bags is a good way to reduce environmental problems. (d) ...
4
votes
2answers
221 views

Why the word building is used insead of using built?

We used to say the word as building. Generally, we use the gerund form in the present continuous tense. Why are we using the word building when it is already built?
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votes
3answers
5k views

“Was talking” vs. “Has been talking”

An online instructor was asked by a student at the end of their conversation: Which of the following is correct and why? It was nice talking to you. It has been nice talking to you. Is talking a ...
2
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1answer
3k views

in order to [gerund] or [infinitive]?

There are few questions and answer on the choice of gerund versus infinitive. From what I understand, when conveying a purpose the infinitive should be used: I use my key in order to open the door....
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1answer
203 views

In «In addition to *his being a great writer*,» what is «his being a great writer»?

Is that a gerund-like construction? A noun phrase? What kind of part of speech is that? I apologize in advance if there is some thread that already deals with this issue, but since I don't really know ...
0
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1answer
347 views

gerunds: difference between “on doing”, “by doing”, and “in doing”?

What is the difference between "on doing", "by doing", and "in doing"? A difficult point to French learners of English as in all three cases, you would say "en faisant". Example sentences, taken ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

try + ing vs. try to + infinitive [duplicate]

Which sentence is correct: Why don't you try to give up candy if you want to lose some weight? Why don't you try giving up candy if you want to lose some weight?
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1answer
1k views

to be p.p. or being p.p.?AND WHY? [closed]

Would you kindly tell me the difference between the following? She likes to be looked at. She likes being looked at.
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1answer
436 views

something is capable of to be p.p. or being p.p.? [closed]

Manual: small, helpful book capable of being carried in the hand. What is the difference between to be carried and being carried in this sentence?
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1answer
2k views

Provide to somebody to do/doing or Provide for somebody to do/doing?

I'm writing a letter to my teacher to thank her for letting me put on a party, but I'm confused by these: I would like to thank somebody for your support, guidance and encouragement, and for the ...
3
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5answers
7k views

What's the difference between an -ing noun and a real noun

Some verbs have corresponding nouns. Also, an '-ing' can be added to create a new noun. For example: Develop is a verb. Development is a noun. Developing is also a noun. So are the sentences ...
4
votes
1answer
13k views

a good job (of / in / at) doing something

Are the following sentences correct? If so, which is the most common? 1) You did a good job raising your children. 2) You did a good job of raising your children. 3) You did a good job in ...
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1answer
2k views

to be certain to do something versus to be certain of doing something

"Paul is certain to win the race." "Paul is certain of winning the race." What is the difference between these two sentences?
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1answer
3k views

“Recommend to have” vs. “recommend having” [duplicate]

I am writing my bachelor dissertation and several times Microsoft Word has corrected me from "to have" to "having". One of the sentences, for instance, goes like this: The author recommends to ...
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1answer
2k views

“Needs repairing” vs. “needs to be repaired” [duplicate]

Do the following two sentences mean the same thing? If so, which is more commonly used? My car needs repairing. My car needs to be repaired.
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1answer
3k views

“Needs to be repaired” vs. “needs repairing” [duplicate]

Is there any difference in meaning between the following two sentences? My car needs to be repaired. My car needs reparing.
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4answers
86k views

“Started to work” vs “Started working”

What is the difference between the following: Things started to work again. Things started working again.
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1answer
100 views

To repair bicycle is his job. Vs. Repairing bicycle is his job

My question is what the differences are between the two sentences. In what situation do you use infinitive as a subject? And when do you use gerund as a subjective? Thanks a lot!
2
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1answer
2k views

What is the function of “doing” in “when doing something”?

Can anyone please explain if "doing" in "When doing something" is a base+ing verbal, or a present participle used as a verb in an elliptical sentence, or something else entirely. Here's an example of ...
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2answers
943 views

Why is “thought” (verb III) a noun in “Nice thought”? [closed]

I often hear someone says, "Wow, that's such a nice thought!" Movies and books often have that kind of dialogue as well. As I figure it out, "a nice thought" is a noun phrase. Which means "nice" is ...
0
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1answer
253 views

“I see it moving/move”

Basically what't the difference between these two forms in all regards? What do I use? From my native language I've got this habit to always go gerund.
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2answers
2k views

“… need XXX-ing” vs. “… need to be XXX-ed” [duplicate]

What is the difference between these two expressions? Your hair needs brushing. Your hair needs to be brushed.
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3answers
10k views

Proper usage of “is” and “are” when specifying multiple nouns

This is one thing I never really bothered looking into, but have always been unsure of. punching, kicking, slapping or slashing [is/are] strictly prohibited That's what I'm trying to determine. ...
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1answer
2k views

I am looking forward to …? (followed by a Gerund)? [duplicate]

I know, that I am looking forward to hearing from you. is correct. But I am not sure, if this holds also for other verbs? So is I am looking forward to taste your cookies. or is I ...
2
votes
1answer
638 views

What is the correct name for this particular unclear-subject error?

An example: the sentence "Upon finishing these books, I think the reader has a new perspective on history." Taken literally, it could mean that "I, upon finishing these books, think..." Or it ...
3
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5answers
1k views

Infinitive vs. present participle (time relations)

I was told that one of the following refers to the past and the other to the future. I cannot decide which is which and would appreciate it if someone could explain the difference between these ...
2
votes
1answer
238 views

Noun verbs a-gerunding - the meaning of the “a-gerund” form?

The first time I saw this antiquated form was in Steeleye Span's interpretation of The Elf Knight ballad, but I tend to see it now and then and I don't quite know how it is used. Lady Isabel sits ...
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1answer
343 views

Which can be true? The importance of + Ving or the importance of + ADJ + Noun

I am confused about the sentence below. Which structure is used: importance of + Ving or the importance of + ADJ + Noun ? In recently years, there has been growing awareness of the importance of ...
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1answer
2k views

why can't I say “ staying alone”

Why can't I say "staying alone" in this sentence: I like playing with my friends but I also like being alone Why not like staying alone?
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3answers
5k views

Which is correct, “summiting” or “summitting”?

This form of the word is not very common but does see some use as the present participle/gerund of "to summit" as in "Upon summit(t)ing the mountain we took photos but had to begin our descent ...
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1answer
608 views

“Looking to + infinitive” vs “Looking to + gerund” [closed]

Which is the correct expression, looking to build or looking to building? Whether you are looking to build. . . . or Whether you are looking to building. . . .
2
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2answers
8k views

“Having not” vs “not having”

I did a bit of searching on the difference between "not having" and "having not", but I could not find a convincing argument. I typed this sentence; Congratulations on not having given up yet! ...
3
votes
3answers
396 views

Is “to practice volleyball requires stamina” grammatical?

Is the sentence "to practice volleyball requires stamina" grammatically correct? As opposed to the sentence "practicing volleyball requires stamina"? Another example: To ensure safety ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

“To see” vs “seeing” [duplicate]

Which of the following is grammatical? To see my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! Seeing my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! The verb "to see" is ...
1
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1answer
1k views

“Committed to build” vs. “committed to building”

If this were a mere tagline, not a complete sentence in a full paragraph, which would be more correct? Committed to build a better world Committed to building a better world
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1answer
422 views

What term describes this sentence structure with preposition and possible gerund? [closed]

What is the correct grammatical description for this sentence? I need help taking out an old hard drive. I am most interested in whether the verb "take" is a gerund here, and how to describe the ...
2
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2answers
8k views

Grammatical complements for “allow”

Are any of these verb phrases grammatical? allows the user of modeling and resolving allows the user to model and resolve Which version of the following sentence is correct/better? ...
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1answer
1k views

“Developed to [infinitive]” vs. “developed for [gerund]” [duplicate]

I am confused about when to use "to verb" and when to use "for verb+ing" constructs. For example what would be the proper construct for the following sentences extracted from scientific journals: ...
0
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2answers
2k views

“Committed to supporting X” vs. “committed to support X” [duplicate]

I'm trying to edit a speech and found a commonly used phase which I'm not sure if I should amend it or not. The sentence goes like this: [a subject] is committed to supporting [a project]. ...