A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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Gerund phrase…is it really?

Object of Preposition Some people consider my interest in gardening an obsession. (The gerund phrase is “gardening an obsession.”) As I was searching around for the correct use of gerund ...
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160 views

“Text from your phone asking me to meet.” Why is it “asking”?

In the movie Taken 3 (2015), one character is looking at a text message on a mobile phone, and he says to another character: Text from your phone asking mom to meet you at the rancho Berrego the ...
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322 views

'When going to school…', 'When I went to school…' What is the difference?

What is the difference between these two sentences in meaning? When going to school, I wore necklaces with starfish pendants." and When I went to school, I wore necklaces with starfish ...
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136 views

It is about Gerunds and present participle [duplicate]

Please clarify if what I have mentioned below is correct. I like painting. - Gerund? I like painting pictures. - Present participle?
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1answer
281 views

Simple or perfect form of gerund [closed]

I just wondering if the meaning of the following sentences are equivalent? I know the difference between past and perfect tenses. So I'm just trying to ask if I can use first sentence instead of the ...
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1answer
327 views

“-ing” verb + gerund

I am aware that some verbs require the use of a gerund in certain constructions like "to avoid doing something". However, does this rule extend to the case that avoid is also used in an -ing form? ...
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2answers
101 views

Use of preposition 'to'

I hope to understand the use of the preposition to gerunds and the overall structure of the following sentence. Normally the use of to is to specify a destination or a purpose but here the way it is ...
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1answer
299 views

Responsibility, the Gerund, and the Perfect Aspect

In the process of answering this question on ELL, I hit upon something I can't explain. The sentence in question is: Who is responsible for leaving the window open? I think anyone hearing that ...
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1answer
202 views

In «In addition to *his being a great writer*,» what is «his being a great writer»?

Is that a gerund-like construction? A noun phrase? What kind of part of speech is that? I apologize in advance if there is some thread that already deals with this issue, but since I don't really know ...
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429 views

something is capable of to be p.p. or being p.p.? [closed]

Manual: small, helpful book capable of being carried in the hand. What is the difference between to be carried and being carried in this sentence?
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2k views

Is it necessary to use “the” before using verb+“ing” in specific contexts?

I am confused with whether it is necessary to use the before verbs in certain contexts. Like: The milking of a cow is not a painful process at all like you think. I am afraid it has never been ...
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3k views

“Ambitious to [infinitive]” vs. “ambitious about [gerund]”

What is the correct preposition to use with ambitious? I am ambitious to achieve success. I am ambitious about achieving success.
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123 views

“by winning” vs “by her winning” or “of her win”

I have a dilema, here's a little excerpt: Anna, an accomplished classical musician, was encouraged by her winning the prestigious award .... plans to launch a new album. Sounds really wrong. ...
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655 views

Should there be a gerund or a noun in front of the preposition?

(a) The rise of price of goods burdens the people. (b) The rising of price of goods burdens the people. (c) The ban of plastic bags is a good way to reduce environmental problems. (d) ...
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39 views

-ing verbs after comma

I need to know if the usage of the gerund form in the following sentence is correct: The relations between the countries cold due to the piercing statements by the President in 2007, criticizing the ...
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89 views

Double Consonants in Gerund

Is there any rules regarding gerund that tell when to double the consonant of a word and when not to? I'm a little bit confused regarding this matter. Based on this link there are words that can be ...
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39 views

Is a deverbal noun with at least two adjectives plural, or can it be?

Is a deverbal noun with at least two adjectives plural, or can it be? An example sentence (from research regarding medical monitoring of vital signs): Continuous and automated monitoring is... ...
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64 views

Participial as adverbial?

''Solve the questions using what I have taught you.'' ''He showed up wearing a suit.'' ''It is doing a nice job covering up the broken chair.'' ''I broke the law getting you out of jail.'' ''You were ...
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54 views

Mass measuring vs Measuring mass

I have a table of Measuring Equipment, which is NOT in English. There is a column called Parameter Measured, where the following is specified: Refractive index measuring Mass Measuring Optical ...
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47 views

Why did the author use “muttering” instead of “mutters” in this sentence?

"He wanders away from the group, muttering something about fingers and toes." - The hunger game, Mockingjay. And can you give me the name of this grammar structure? Is it short form of relative ...
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75 views

“predicting” or “prediction of”?

What is the difference between "can be used for prediction of user behaviour" and "can be used for predicting user behaviour"? I like the second version more since it's shorter and without a ...
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1answer
129 views

In what (semantic) context might “REFUSE” be used with a gerund complement?

I know that, prescriptively speaking, that the verb "refuse" is supposed to be followed by an infinitive. For example: The parents refused to buy the dangerous toy for their kid. Since language ...
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241 views

“Informing” — Gerund instead of Verb+Object?

I think if we take informing as a noun in this sentence, it should be fine. What are your views on the grammaticality of the following sentence? He left me without informing.
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238 views

“spent a lot of money to buy a house” vs. “spent a lot of money buying a house”

He spent a lot of money to buy a house. He spent a lot of money buying a house. In my head both of the sentences are correct. What's the difference between these sentences?
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106 views

How to use a gerund with 'my' in a sentence? [duplicate]

I am trying to say, "this led to my working as a research assistant with ...". I think something's awry in this phrase. Am I right?
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131 views

Is this a correct usage of a gerund?

I have already used structures such as "I don't like him singing the song" or "I don't like his singing the song". It dates back to years age when I learned it. So I wonder if I can use the following ...
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328 views

Dedicated to producing vs dedicated to the production - use of gerund in place of noun

- A factory famous for the production of. . . - A factory famous for producing . . . - A farm dedicated to the cultivation of . . . - A farm dedicated to cultivating . . . - The firm focused on the ...
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Why is it that “I called for confirmation that …” but “thank you for confirming that …”?

For example, it sounds natural to use the noun form in this sentence: This morning the hotel called for confirmation that I will stay there. But in this sentence it sounds better to use the gerund: ...
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112 views

Why do we use the gerund of begin but not end when discussing a range?

In colloquial speech, one often hears the use of the beginning and the end to denote a range, but you rarely hear them paired in the same form or or the opposite pairing: ie begin and ending, begin ...
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1answer
3k views

“Recommend to have” vs. “recommend having” [duplicate]

I am writing my bachelor dissertation and several times Microsoft Word has corrected me from "to have" to "having". One of the sentences, for instance, goes like this: The author recommends to ...
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1k views

“Committed to build” vs. “committed to building”

If this were a mere tagline, not a complete sentence in a full paragraph, which would be more correct? Committed to build a better world Committed to building a better world
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3k views

Why is “doing” used here instead of “to do”?

I have read this question: “I like to do (be) something” vs “I like doing (being) something” and I get (although the answer could not be applied to my example) that using "to do" means in general I ...
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37 views

Chinese character “denoting” or “used to denote” black color?

How to say the following phrase correctly: a Chinese character denoting OR used to denote black colour? Context Furthermore, due to the etymological analysis of a Chinese character denoting black ...
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57 views

Does the word ‘not’ modify verbs beforehand or afterward?

I have had some trouble recently with the word not, and people being confused by my use of it. I suppose I made some incorrect logical connection with it. A friend and I were discussing the placement ...
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32 views

'lead to someone doing something' OR 'lead to someone's doing something'

Under the entry lead (v.), Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English (5th edition) lists: lead to someone doing something example: His actions could lead to him losing his job. However, ...
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40 views

“I understand him going back there” [duplicate]

I heard a sportscaster say this. Since gerunds are preceded by possessive pronouns, this would have to be a present participle. (him, who is going back). I do think, however, that the gerund (his ...
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76 views

Can I use a noun phrase with “after” or “before” to talk about specific past events or “past perfect” is required?

I know that gerunds can be used with before or after in the present tense when talking about facts: I always turn off the lights before going to bed. But can I use a gerund with "after" or "...
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83 views

Usage of “to spend” instead of gerund [duplicate]

In the following sentence, although a gerund would be preferred, is the usage of "to spend" correct? "Do you really think it's worth it to spend hundreds of pounds on video games?"
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100 views

“Demolishing and rebuilding of house.” — are the -ing words gerunds?

I am working with a local government system into which people submit proposals to modify real estate and the phrasing they use is sometimes somewhat odd e.g.: Demolishing and rebuilding house. ...
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22 views

Using to + gerund and to + invinitive [duplicate]

"I go to school" Because 'to' is a preposition then is it correct to write "I go to watching the movie"? If not, please explain why. Thank you.
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99 views

devote herself to caring for poor people vs. devote herself to care for poor people [duplicate]

I came across the following multiple-choice question: She devoted herself to ( ) for poor people. The choices are: caring care be caring have cared As the preposition "to" can be ...
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33 views

“Thank you for your coming” and “Thank you for your understanding” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming” The first one seems ungrammatical, as pointed by some of native speakers. But the latter one ...
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3answers
5k views

Which is correct, “summiting” or “summitting”?

This form of the word is not very common but does see some use as the present participle/gerund of "to summit" as in "Upon summit(t)ing the mountain we took photos but had to begin our descent ...
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52 views

SAT Grammar - Gerunds vs. Parallelism

Hello everyone I was working on the following question: I said the error was A, because it should be how to preserve right? But apparently that is not the error, I cannot seem to find any other ...
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878 views

Infinitive of purpose or “for verb-ing”

The chambers inside the pyramid were closed (to/for) visitors (to clean and repair/for cleaning and repairing). Which is the correct alternative in both the brackets, and why? Please explain in ...
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“… need XXX-ing” vs. “… need to be XXX-ed” [duplicate]

What is the difference between these two expressions? Your hair needs brushing. Your hair needs to be brushed.
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3answers
2k views

Why is a gerund used after the verb “confess to”

A simple form of the verb is often used after to, but sometimes the simple form is replaced by a gerund. For example: He confessed to having a secret admiration for his opponent. Edwards ...
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Is “Forgive my being late” grammatical?

Is it grammatically correct to write "forgive my being late to this discussion" as an alternative to "sorry that I'm late to this discussion"?
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“To know X is all I need” vs. “knowing X is all I need” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does one know when to use a gerund or a infinitive? Which of the following is the correct form? To know you're interested in my book is all I need to go on with ...
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52 views

Can we parse this sentence in two ways?

Being a Maia didn't stop Elendil and Gil-Galad from kicking his butt. As of now, this is an apt comment on this question at SFF (Why does Sauron fear Aragorn if he is a Maia?). I wonder whether, ...