A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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2answers
242 views

“What led to you doing this thing” grammar?

I'm current curious about this sentence's grammar: What led to you doing this thing? It sounds like "you doing this thing" is noun. What is this grammar?
2
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2answers
7k views

Expect +to VS expect + ing

I know that expect is used this way: I expect you to do that. But I have also seen examples like with verb in its "ing" form: > What to expect working at... > I will expect you doing ...
1
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2answers
111 views

“by winning” vs “by her winning” or “of her win”

I have a dilema, here's a little excerpt: Anna, an accomplished classical musician, was encouraged by her winning the prestigious award .... plans to launch a new album. Sounds really wrong. ...
4
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3answers
148 views

“Watched them get married” vs “watched them getting married”

I read the following: The next day as I watched them get married... How does it differ from the following? Is one more eloquent and accurate than other? The next day as I watched them ...
-3
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1answer
2k views

Is this use of “having” correct? [closed]

Please consider this sentence in which I am using having: Having full driving licence, life insurance, 5 year driving experience and never have an accident, I am great driver. Is this use of ...
16
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4answers
859 views

'The X-ing of Y' vs just 'X-ing Y' : why are both 'the' and 'of' necessary together?

Take the example of There is very little that a conforming POSIX.1 application can do by catching, ignoring or masking SIGSYS (From the SIGSYS article) This can be rewritten as There is ...
5
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1answer
359 views

Why was _to_ verb_+ing_ used in this case? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to use “to + V-ing”? “To hear” or “to hearing”? Samson had been a strong man prior to having his hair cut. From a grammatical point of view, when ...
5
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5answers
179 views

Is it widely accepted to use ‘gridiron’ as a verb and gerund?

Time magazine (September 30) carries the article titled “Christie to Watch Football” followed by the lead copy: “Garden Stater in no rush to decide, will mull while gridironing this weekend. AP ...
6
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2answers
390 views

Referring to a gerund with a pronoun

Is it considered grammatical to refer to a gerund in the subject position with the pronoun "it"? Example: Visiting a dentist regularly is recommended as it can contribute to overall health.
12
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2answers
3k views

Past tense and “rather than”

I found myself with a sentence like this, using "accept" in the infinitive form after "rather than": They left the club, rather than accept the terms. But I'm unsure of its grammatical ...
1
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1answer
1k views

Why is “doing” used here instead of “to do”?

I have read this question: “I like to do (be) something” vs “I like doing (being) something” and I get (although the answer could not be applied to my example) that using "to do" means in general I ...
0
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4answers
2k views

Is “Forgive my being late” grammatical?

Is it grammatically correct to write "forgive my being late to this discussion" as an alternative to "sorry that I'm late to this discussion"?
6
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1answer
3k views

“I love to [verb]” vs “I love [gerund]” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: Catenatives followed by infinitives and gerunds “I like to do (be) something” vs “I like doing (being) something” What is the difference between "I love to sing" and ...
5
votes
1answer
830 views

Why do we not include a possessive in “thank you for coming”, and include one in “thank you for *your* kindness”?

Why is it more correct to say "thank you for coming" than "thank you for your coming," but it's okay to say "thank you for your kindness," rather than "thank you for kindness"?
5
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1answer
2k views

How do I know when a verb should be followed by a gerund or an infinitive?

A few weeks ago I posted a question about the usage of a verbal in a particular sentence. But now, I have another question on the same topic, gerund. Sometimes I don't know for sure if I need to use ...
1
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2answers
910 views

To use “to” or not to? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Gerund or infinitive: When to use which? You like to read books. You like reading books. The second second sentence seems to be better than the first. Why is ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

one's way of V-ing / one's way to V / a/the way of V-ing / a/the way to V

There are some options when you use the word way and some verb together: (1) a. There are some way of writing.       b. There are some way to write. Is there any ...
2
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3answers
774 views

Progressive form required for “as”, “while”, etc.?

Are both forms grammatically correct? As I was entering the shop, I saw her. As I entered the shop, I saw her.
2
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3answers
535 views

Which one should I use (“suggesting” or “to suggest”) in the example provided?

I can’t find anything suggesting that one cannot take out principle from Roth IRA account for education or housing purchases. Nor it’s indicated that money are doled out in a form of a loan. Part ...
4
votes
2answers
183 views

Is “a disclaiming” a gerund?

EDIT see end of question for updates: The question came up if this is proper English: Sorry, I felt the need for a disclaiming for some reason. And I think it is but some others say it isn't. ...
2
votes
3answers
661 views

Proper Usage of gerund form of the verb

So, I want to title a talk. Which of these is the right usage and why? "Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to solve them" OR "Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to ...