A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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156 views

What's the plural of “picking up”?

I'm writing in the context of ice skating. This is the sentence I wish to construct: There will be many falls, but serious injuries are rare, and picking ups are easy. "picking up" is the ...
2
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4answers
2k views

Can I use the word “promise” with gerund?

Is it possible to use gerund after the verb "promise"? For example, in the sentence "He promised cleaning the window. I'd prefer to say: He promised to clean the window. But today I was told that this ...
2
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1answer
237 views

“A tool to do” vs. “a tool that does” vs. “a tool for doing”

I'm the curator of the Open Web Platform Daily Digest link. In the "Tools" section of each daily I write entries in this format: tool_name, tool_description For example: hapi, a server framework ...
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3answers
860 views

Noun or non-finite subordinate clause?

Consider the following sentence: The government wants to encourage understanding of science. Now, "to encourage understanding of science" is a non-finite subordinate clause functioning as an ...
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1answer
1k views

On or upon + gerund

Which preposition are we supposed to use - on or upon. i.e. "On/upon closing the door, set the alarm on."
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1answer
58 views

Why is “attention payment” incorrect?

I have been wondering why some people think that "attention payment" is an accepted phrase. The argument is that you "pay attention", therefore you can learn "attention payment". This sounds incorrect,...
2
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2answers
95 views

Infinitive or gerund [duplicate]

So, I've got this phrase: ''Far from fleeing monotony, animals crave it, and what they most dread is to see it end.'' Can someone explain me why it is written ''to see it end'' rather than ''to see ...
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2answers
13k views

Can I use 'drenching' to mean 'being drenched'?

I understand 'drench' means to soak or get wet. Can I say 'I'm drenching in the rain' to mean that I'm standing in the rain and getting soaked by it? I mostly see 'drenching' being used only as a ...
2
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1answer
83 views

A question about “to becoming” [duplicate]

Would this sentence be correct? Being scared is the first step to becoming free. The more I look at it, the less clear it becomes.
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2answers
3k views

usage of the verb to bridge in “Bridging someone to something”

My friend suggested a tag line for our project: "Bridging you to your dream higher education online" and I have doubts that "bridging you to smth." is a proper word usage. I've never heard this ...
2
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1answer
232 views

Noun verbs a-gerunding - the meaning of the “a-gerund” form?

The first time I saw this antiquated form was in Steeleye Span's interpretation of The Elf Knight ballad, but I tend to see it now and then and I don't quite know how it is used. Lady Isabel sits ...
2
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1answer
997 views

How to form a gerund from “practise”?

I (think) I know the difference between practise (verb) and practice (non-verb). However, I am not sure which form I should use in cases like the following ones: I love practising the guitar. ...
2
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4answers
727 views

What is the “, gerund” sentence called, and how can I improve it?

I'm proofreading a friend's paper, and she often creates sentences of the form: Sentence, gerund-phrase Examples: Consumers may question the legitimacy of producer actions, determining their ...
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1answer
42 views

Disturb “the function” or “the functioning” of the device?

I have in my quantum physics lab report The system cannot disturb the function of the device. but my friend proposes The system cannot disturb the functioning of the device. I think the ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

Gerund with and without “of” preposition

Could you please explain the difference between using of a gerund with and without "of" preposition? For example what is the difference between following sentences: I've worked on improving of ...
2
votes
1answer
78 views

Noun + Gerund vs Gerund + Noun

I try to shorten the expression: "period [of smth] when [the device] moves / stands" to use it as a parameter name, and have come up with these two options: 'Period moving' / 'Period standing' '...
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2answers
84 views

Question about the details in meaning between gerund and to-infinite

Consider the following multiple-choice question: The supervisors were asked ______ tasks to new employees so that they could be trained to do them properly. A. Delegate - infinitive B. To ...
2
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1answer
270 views

Possessive followed by negative gerund

Is it correct to say this? Her not paying attention to the class annoys me.
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1answer
24k views

Any difference between “Sorry I'm late!” and “Sorry for being late!”?

Is one of these sentences used more than the other? (I'm) sorry I'm late. (I'm) sorry for being late. Or is one more formal than the other?
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1answer
2k views

What is the function of “doing” in “when doing something”?

Can anyone please explain if "doing" in "When doing something" is a base+ing verbal, or a present participle used as a verb in an elliptical sentence, or something else entirely. Here's an example of ...
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2answers
7k views

“Having not” vs “not having”

I did a bit of searching on the difference between "not having" and "having not", but I could not find a convincing argument. I typed this sentence; Congratulations on not having given up yet! ...
2
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3answers
4k views

Is there a single-word noun for an overwhelming feeling that uses “overwhelm” as its root?

Is there a single-word noun for an overwhelming feeling that uses overwhelm as its root? My first thought was to make a gerund, that is, overwhelming. Although overwhelming is normally used as an ...
2
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1answer
62 views

The correct use of “sundering”

I'm writing a book in which one of the major events is a day that separates two major forces in the world. It's meant to be a punishment from a high power, so at first I wanted to call it The Day of ...
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3answers
5k views

“Was talking” vs. “Has been talking”

An online instructor was asked by a student at the end of their conversation: Which of the following is correct and why? It was nice talking to you. It has been nice talking to you. Is talking a ...
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1answer
47 views

“It's hard to find a good path to taking this mission on”. Why “taking”

So the sentience is "It's hard to find a good path to taking this mission on", I wonder why it is "to taking it on" not "to take it on", is "taking" using as a gerund? Can I say "It's hard to find a ...
2
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1answer
3k views

“To see” vs “seeing” [duplicate]

Which of the following is grammatical? To see my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! Seeing my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! The verb "to see" is ...
2
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1answer
544 views

Use of gerund without preposition “to”

Can I use gerunds with the word "concede" without using preposition "to" as in the sentence below? He concedes killing his wife.
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9k views

When is it acceptable to start a sentence with an “-ing” word?

Here's my example. It is a sentence that begins in the middle of a paragraph and I'm using it as a transition. "Living in Costa Rica also gave me the opportunity to interact with the local ...
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1answer
352 views

Usage of “being” in “I am always afraid of being bitten”

Does anybody know what 'being' means in the following statement? I don't like dogs. I am always afraid of being bitten. Why is being used in this statement? It looks like a passive statement, ...
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3answers
627 views

“A smile cures the wounding of a frown”

I found the following on a poster of a professional photographer: A smile cures the wounding of a frown The sentence seems awkward and wrong to me. I think something can cure a disease and heal ...
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2answers
288 views

“He remembered seeing a pocket compass […] and marveling/marveled”

Albert Einstein talked about what influenced his life as a scientist. He remembered seeing a pocket compass when he was five years old and (marveling/marveled) that the needle always pointed north....
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2answers
587 views

Is “solutioning” a correct word in a technical context? [closed]

I'm a translator from English into Italian language. While translating a British patent I found the following sentence: The large heat treatment window seen in the ThermoCalc simulation also ...
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4answers
915 views

“spent a lot of time to shop” vs. “spent a lot of time shopping”

She spends a lot of time to shop. She spends a lot of time shopping. Are both of these sentences grammatically correct and do they have the same meaning?
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2answers
513 views

Is “Studying will help me with achieving my dreams” grammatical? [closed]

I need to take sentences out of a transcript, so I can’t change the structure of this particular sentence. I can either use it in my work as a grammatically correct sentence, or I can't. I just ...
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2answers
3k views

To use “to” or not to? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Gerund or infinitive: When to use which? You like to read books. You like reading books. The second second sentence seems to be better than the first. Why is that?...
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2answers
1k views

Bare infinitive and gerund participle

I saw him kick the stone. According to my reference book this sentence is grammatically correct even though the verb 'kick' is in present tense while the action has already happened. If I write ...
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2answers
36 views

Using gerund while listing actions in the past

I'm writing a piece of fiction as training to improve my English skills, and I've written this small piece: The boys had been bulling her again, hiding her things and dumping her backback in a ...
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2answers
186 views

Do these two sentences use the possessive case of gerunds properly?

Gerunds have proven to be adequate forms of "annoyances" to me and have thus led me to inquire their properties and uses. I would appreciate it if anyone could provide me with assistance in this ...
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2answers
370 views

Problem with gerunds

I'm a non-native English speaker and have recently come across a phrase, also written by a non-native English speaker, that puzzled me: Automatic creating tasks (this is the name of a software ...
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3answers
321 views

Can the word 'formatting' be used as a noun?

Can the word formatting be used as a noun like in the following sentence: Consider the formatting of this JavaScript code... Or is it a gerund which should be used without an article: Consider ...
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2answers
920 views

Why is “thought” (verb III) a noun in “Nice thought”? [closed]

I often hear someone says, "Wow, that's such a nice thought!" Movies and books often have that kind of dialogue as well. As I figure it out, "a nice thought" is a noun phrase. Which means "nice" is ...
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2answers
429 views

Noun phrase after “show”

The following sentences all involve the verb "show" followed by a noun phrase. Number 6 sounds a bit weird, and the last one is just wrong — but why is that? The video shows the ...
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3answers
1k views

Proper Usage of gerund form of the verb [closed]

So, I want to title a talk. Which of these is the right usage and why? "Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to solve them" OR "Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to ...
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2answers
186 views

Is there a form and/or synonym of the gerund “spelling” that can be put into an adverb position such as that of “grammatically”?

That is, how would I go about converting the word "spelling" (as in the spelling of a word) to an adverb that actually sounds right in the blank of "_____-inept"? I'm pretty sure "spellingly" isn't a ...
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1answer
2k views

to be certain to do something versus to be certain of doing something

"Paul is certain to win the race." "Paul is certain of winning the race." What is the difference between these two sentences?
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2answers
2k views

Infinitive or Gerund for celebration of an event?

Which of the following sentences would be correct in a baby shower invitation. My grandparents are looking forward to celebrate my arrival in February. My grandparents are looking forward to ...
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3answers
18k views

“Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming”

Consider "Thank you for coming" and "Thank you for your coming". Would the latter one be grammatical? Why? Is it possible to recognize latter "coming" as noun? Some say you need no pronoun because it ...
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2answers
413 views

“What led to you doing this thing” grammar?

I'm current curious about this sentence's grammar: What led to you doing this thing? It sounds like "you doing this thing" is noun. What is this grammar?
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1answer
73 views

Can I say “I am glad hearing from you” or it is wrong? [closed]

I am glad hearing from you. Is it correct? And does it have a real meaning or it doesn't?
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1answer
94 views

Gerund phrase…is it really?

Object of Preposition Some people consider my interest in gardening an obsession. (The gerund phrase is “gardening an obsession.”) As I was searching around for the correct use of gerund ...