A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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Is there a single-word noun for an overwhelming feeling that uses “overwhelm” as its root?

Is there a single-word noun for an overwhelming feeling that uses overwhelm as its root? My first thought was to make a gerund, that is, overwhelming. Although overwhelming is normally used as an ...
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1answer
59 views

The correct use of “sundering”

I'm writing a book in which one of the major events is a day that separates two major forces in the world. It's meant to be a punishment from a high power, so at first I wanted to call it The Day of ...
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1answer
2k views

“To see” vs “seeing” [duplicate]

Which of the following is grammatical? To see my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! Seeing my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! The verb "to see" is ...
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432 views

Use of gerund without preposition “to”

Can I use gerunds with the word "concede" without using preposition "to" as in the sentence below? He concedes killing his wife.
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4k views

When is it acceptable to start a sentence with an “-ing” word?

Here's my example. It is a sentence that begins in the middle of a paragraph and I'm using it as a transition. "Living in Costa Rica also gave me the opportunity to interact with the local ...
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1answer
277 views

Usage of “being” in “I am always afraid of being bitten”

Does anybody know what 'being' means in the below statement? I don't like dogs. I am always afraid of being bitten. Why is being used in this statement? It looks like a passive statement, but if ...
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3answers
518 views

“A smile cures the wounding of a frown”

I found the following on a poster of a professional photographer: A smile cures the wounding of a frown The sentence seems awkward and wrong to me. I think something can cure a disease and heal ...
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2answers
252 views

“He remembered seeing a pocket compass […] and marveling/marveled”

Albert Einstein talked about what influenced his life as a scientist. He remembered seeing a pocket compass when he was five years old and (marveling/marveled) that the needle always pointed ...
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424 views

Is “solutioning” a correct word in a technical context? [closed]

I'm a translator from English into Italian language. While translating a British patent I found the following sentence: The large heat treatment window seen in the ThermoCalc simulation also ...
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2answers
270 views

Is “Studying will help me with achieving my dreams” grammatical?

I need to take sentences out of a transcript, so I can’t change the structure of this particular sentence. I can either use it in my work as a grammatically correct sentence, or I can't. I just ...
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1answer
405 views

What is the correct name for this particular unclear-subject error?

An example: the sentence "Upon finishing these books, I think the reader has a new perspective on history." Taken literally, it could mean that "I, upon finishing these books, think..." Or it ...
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2answers
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To use “to” or not to? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Gerund or infinitive: When to use which? You like to read books. You like reading books. The second second sentence seems to be better than the first. Why is ...
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Bare infinitive and gerund participle

I saw him kick the stone. According to my reference book this sentence is grammatically correct even though the verb 'kick' is in present tense while the action has already happened. If I write ...
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2answers
75 views

Do these two sentences use the possessive case of gerunds properly?

Gerunds have proven to be adequate forms of "annoyances" to me and have thus led me to inquire their properties and uses. I would appreciate it if anyone could provide me with assistance in this ...
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2answers
304 views

Problem with gerunds

I'm a non-native English speaker and have recently come across a phrase, also written by a non-native English speaker, that puzzled me: Automatic creating tasks (this is the name of a software ...
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4answers
157 views

“spent a lot of time to shop” vs. “spent a lot of time shopping”

She spends a lot of time to shop. She spends a lot of time shopping. Are both of these sentences grammatically correct and do they have the same meaning?
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3answers
269 views

Can the word 'formatting' be used as a noun?

Can the word formatting be used as a noun like in the following sentence: Consider the formatting of this JavaScript code... Or is it a gerund which should be used without an article: Consider ...
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1answer
820 views

try + ing vs. try to + infinitive [duplicate]

Which sentence is correct: Why don't you try to give up candy if you want to lose some weight? Why don't you try giving up candy if you want to lose some weight?
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2answers
523 views

Why is “thought” (verb III) a noun in “Nice thought”? [closed]

I often hear someone says, "Wow, that's such a nice thought!" Movies and books often have that kind of dialogue as well. As I figure it out, "a nice thought" is a noun phrase. Which means "nice" is ...
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2answers
410 views

Noun phrase after “show”

The following sentences all involve the verb "show" followed by a noun phrase. Number 6 sounds a bit weird, and the last one is just wrong — but why is that? The video shows the ...
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2answers
12k views

“Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming”

Consider "Thank you for coming" and "Thank you for your coming". Would the latter one be grammatical? Why? Is it possible to recognize latter "coming" as noun? Some say you need no pronoun because it ...
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3answers
923 views

Proper Usage of gerund form of the verb [closed]

So, I want to title a talk. Which of these is the right usage and why? "Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to solve them" OR "Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to ...
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75 views

Is there a form and/or synonym of the gerund “spelling” that can be put into an adverb position such as that of “grammatically”?

That is, how would I go about converting the word "spelling" (as in the spelling of a word) to an adverb that actually sounds right in the blank of "_____-inept"? I'm pretty sure "spellingly" isn't a ...
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1answer
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to be certain to do something versus to be certain of doing something

"Paul is certain to win the race." "Paul is certain of winning the race." What is the difference between these two sentences?
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Infinitive or Gerund for celebration of an event?

Which of the following sentences would be correct in a baby shower invitation. My grandparents are looking forward to celebrate my arrival in February. My grandparents are looking forward to ...
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360 views

“What led to you doing this thing” grammar?

I'm current curious about this sentence's grammar: What led to you doing this thing? It sounds like "you doing this thing" is noun. What is this grammar?
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1answer
64 views

It is about Gerunds and present participle [duplicate]

Please clarify if what I have mentioned below is correct. I like painting. - Gerund? I like painting pictures. - Present participle?
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2answers
165 views

When must a gerund be preceded by a possessive pronoun as opposed to an accusative one?

I was recently reading this very interesting post here: When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun? In this thread, it is argued persuasively that we could use either his or ...
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1answer
103 views

Simple or perfect form of gerund [closed]

I just wondering if the meaning of the following sentences are equivalent? I know the difference between past and perfect tenses. So I'm just trying to ask if I can use first sentence instead of the ...
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2answers
90 views

Use of preposition 'to'

I hope to understand the use of the preposition to gerunds and the overall structure of the following sentence. Normally the use of to is to specify a destination or a purpose but here the way it is ...
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1answer
220 views

Responsibility, the Gerund, and the Perfect Aspect

In the process of answering this question on ELL, I hit upon something I can't explain. The sentence in question is: Who is responsible for leaving the window open? I think anyone hearing that ...
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1answer
145 views

In «In addition to *his being a great writer*,» what is «his being a great writer»?

Is that a gerund-like construction? A noun phrase? What kind of part of speech is that? I apologize in advance if there is some thread that already deals with this issue, but since I don't really know ...
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1answer
354 views

something is capable of to be p.p. or being p.p.? [closed]

Manual: small, helpful book capable of being carried in the hand. What is the difference between to be carried and being carried in this sentence?
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1answer
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Is it necessary to use “the” before using verb+“ing” in specific contexts?

I am confused with whether it is necessary to use the before verbs in certain contexts. Like: The milking of a cow is not a painful process at all like you think. I am afraid it has never been ...
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“Ambitious to [infinitive]” vs. “ambitious about [gerund]”

What is the correct preposition to use with ambitious? I am ambitious to achieve success. I am ambitious about achieving success.
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2answers
123 views

“by winning” vs “by her winning” or “of her win”

I have a dilema, here's a little excerpt: Anna, an accomplished classical musician, was encouraged by her winning the prestigious award .... plans to launch a new album. Sounds really wrong. ...
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2answers
603 views

Should there be a gerund or a noun in front of the preposition?

(a) The rise of price of goods burdens the people. (b) The rising of price of goods burdens the people. (c) The ban of plastic bags is a good way to reduce environmental problems. ...
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42 views

“predicting” or “prediction of”?

What is the difference between "can be used for prediction of user behaviour" and "can be used for predicting user behaviour"? I like the second version more since it's shorter and without a ...
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1answer
78 views

In what (semantic) context might “REFUSE” be used with a gerund complement?

I know that, prescriptively speaking, that the verb "refuse" is supposed to be followed by an infinitive. For example: The parents refused to buy the dangerous toy for their kid. Since language ...
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1answer
95 views

“Informing” — Gerund instead of Verb+Object?

I think if we take informing as a noun in this sentence, it should be fine. What are your views on the grammaticality of the following sentence? He left me without informing.
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1answer
117 views

“spent a lot of money to buy a house” vs. “spent a lot of money buying a house”

He spent a lot of money to buy a house. He spent a lot of money buying a house. In my head both of the sentences are correct. What's the difference between these sentences?
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1answer
92 views

How to use a gerund with 'my' in a sentence? [duplicate]

I am trying to say, "this led to my working as a research assistant with ...". I think something's awry in this phrase. Am I right?
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1answer
85 views

Is this a correct usage of a gerund?

I have already used structures such as "I don't like him singing the song" or "I don't like his singing the song". It dates back to years age when I learned it. So I wonder if I can use the following ...
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2answers
1k views

Why is it that “I called for confirmation that …” but “thank you for confirming that …”?

For example, it sounds natural to use the noun form in this sentence: This morning the hotel called for confirmation that I will stay there. But in this sentence it sounds better to use the gerund: ...
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usage of the verb to bridge in “Bridging someone to something”

My friend suggested a tag line for our project: "Bridging you to your dream higher education online" and I have doubts that "bridging you to smth." is a proper word usage. I've never heard this ...
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4answers
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Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
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1answer
2k views

“Recommend to have” vs. “recommend having” [duplicate]

I am writing my bachelor dissertation and several times Microsoft Word has corrected me from "to have" to "having". One of the sentences, for instance, goes like this: The author recommends to ...
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1answer
572 views

“Committed to build” vs. “committed to building”

If this were a mere tagline, not a complete sentence in a full paragraph, which would be more correct? Committed to build a better world Committed to building a better world
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“Was talking” vs. “Has been talking”

An online instructor was asked by a student at the end of their conversation: Which of the following is correct and why? It was nice talking to you. It has been nice talking to you. Is talking a ...
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1answer
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Why is “doing” used here instead of “to do”?

I have read this question: “I like to do (be) something” vs “I like doing (being) something” and I get (although the answer could not be applied to my example) that using "to do" means in general I ...