A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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2answers
4k views

“Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming”

Consider "Thank you for coming" and "Thank you for your coming". Would the latter one be grammatical? Why? Is it possible to recognize latter "coming" as noun? Some say you need no pronoun because it ...
18
votes
6answers
2k views

When can the -ing form of a verb be placed before a noun?

My native-speaker's grammatical intuition tells me that: There is a sleeping man under the tree. is fine but There is a fishing man by the river bank. is wrong. Why? I've thought about ...
7
votes
3answers
994 views

Help identifying an error type “tried to help me learning”

I have a friend from Russia who is trying to learn English and recently used the sentence "He tried to help me learning..." (implied: the English language) It is obviously wrong and I corrected it ...
-1
votes
1answer
9k views

“Prefer to do something” vs. “prefer doing something” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should a verb be followed by a gerund instead of an infinitive? What's the difference between the two: What materials do they prefer working with? What ...
-1
votes
1answer
872 views

Past Perfect and gerund vs. Past Perfect and Simple Past [closed]

When using the past perfect tense to say something happened before something else, is it correct to use the gerund form (as opposed to the past tense) to express the latter event? For example, is it ...
1
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2answers
1k views

“Ambitious to [infinitive]” vs. “ambitious about [gerund]”

What is the correct preposition to use with ambitious? I am ambitious to achieve success. I am ambitious about achieving success.
7
votes
3answers
166 views

“Comparing” vs “A comparison of ”

A professor criticized the language in a presentation. In particular he said that English preferred a noun phrase such as a comparison of  to a gerund such as comparing. For reference the entire ...
2
votes
2answers
199 views

Which tense should I use in this situation? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using the gerund two times in a row Here is the sentence: Just as on smoking, voices now come from many quarters (insisting or insist) that the science about ...
4
votes
1answer
168 views

Are all of these sentences grammatical?

He was charged with killing 13 people. He was charged with having killed 13 people. He was charged with the crime he killed 13 people. I suppose the phrase no. 1 is correct but the ...
3
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3answers
975 views

Which of these sentences is correctly written?

Someone edited my message on StackOverflow, but it really bugs me out. I'm not sure what's wrong with it: As you see, the bigger the circle becomes, the more vertices I need for hiding the straight ...
10
votes
1answer
388 views

“Road liable to flooding” — is this roadsign grammatically correct?

I passed the roadsign below while driving home late last night, and realised that despite how many times I had seen it, I was still surprised by the choice of words used and unsure if it was actually ...
1
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3answers
350 views

“A smile cures the wounding of a frown”

I found the following on a poster of a professional photographer: A smile cures the wounding of a frown The sentence seems awkward and wrong to me. I think something can cure a disease and heal ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Correct use of “wanting” [closed]

To begin with a clarification: I'm not speaking of "wanting" as in "lacking" (e.g. a box wanting its lid.) Rather, it's about uses like this one: Person A: I want to go with you. Person B: ...
6
votes
2answers
372 views

“It is fun to write letters” vs. “It is fun writing letters”

Grammatically, "It is fun to write English letters." is correct. But is the following also grammatically correct? It is fun writing English letters.
2
votes
3answers
485 views

Noun or non-finite subordinate clause?

Consider the following sentence: The government wants to encourage understanding of science. Now, "to encourage understanding of science" is a non-finite subordinate clause functioning as an ...
6
votes
2answers
275 views

What is the correct form of a gerund? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun? “Me being” versus “my being” Usage of the gerund preceded by the possessive pronoun I don't really ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

“Was talking” vs. “Has been talking”

An online instructor was asked by a student at the end of their conversation: Which of the following is correct and why? It was nice talking to you. It has been nice talking to you. Is talking a ...
-2
votes
2answers
271 views

“After downloaded” vs. “After downloading” [closed]

What is the difference between "After downloaded" and "After downloading"? Are they both grammatical? After downloaded, I start running this program. After downloading, I start running this ...
6
votes
4answers
14k views

Is “solutioning” a correct word?

My Outlook flags the word "solutioning" as a spelling mistake. According to Urban Dictionary : solutioning: A word many business people misuse to describe the process of creating a solution. ...
0
votes
2answers
115 views

“To know X is all I need” vs. “knowing X is all I need” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does one know when to use a gerund or a infinitive? Which of the following is the correct form? To know you're interested in my book is all I need to go on ...
1
vote
2answers
242 views

“What led to you doing this thing” grammar?

I'm current curious about this sentence's grammar: What led to you doing this thing? It sounds like "you doing this thing" is noun. What is this grammar?
2
votes
4answers
539 views

What is the “, gerund” sentence called, and how can I improve it?

I'm proofreading a friend's paper, and she often creates sentences of the form: Sentence, gerund-phrase Examples: Consumers may question the legitimacy of producer actions, determining their ...
2
votes
2answers
7k views

Expect +to VS expect + ing

I know that expect is used this way: I expect you to do that. But I have also seen examples like with verb in its "ing" form: > What to expect working at... > I will expect you doing ...
1
vote
2answers
111 views

“by winning” vs “by her winning” or “of her win”

I have a dilema, here's a little excerpt: Anna, an accomplished classical musician, was encouraged by her winning the prestigious award .... plans to launch a new album. Sounds really wrong. ...
6
votes
1answer
6k views

“Stop working” vs “stopped to work”

I want to know, is there any difference between "stop + v.(ing)" and "stopped to + v.". These are example sentences. I stop working for a month. vs I stopped to work for a month. I stop watching ...
10
votes
2answers
605 views

“Try to save” or “try saving”

Are both try to save the file and try saving the file grammatically correct? If so, is there any difference in meaning?
4
votes
3answers
148 views

“Watched them get married” vs “watched them getting married”

I read the following: The next day as I watched them get married... How does it differ from the following? Is one more eloquent and accurate than other? The next day as I watched them ...
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votes
1answer
2k views

Is this use of “having” correct? [closed]

Please consider this sentence in which I am using having: Having full driving licence, life insurance, 5 year driving experience and never have an accident, I am great driver. Is this use of ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Grammatical complements for “allow”

Are any of these verb phrases grammatical? allows the user of modeling and resolving allows the user to model and resolve Which version of the following sentence is correct/better? ...
5
votes
4answers
7k views

-ing vs -in' ending

I wonder if the "g" in the -ing forms is pronounced. When I hear it it seems as if it's not pronounced sometimes or just slightly, though sometimes I've been told that I should pronounce "g" for ...
16
votes
4answers
860 views

'The X-ing of Y' vs just 'X-ing Y' : why are both 'the' and 'of' necessary together?

Take the example of There is very little that a conforming POSIX.1 application can do by catching, ignoring or masking SIGSYS (From the SIGSYS article) This can be rewritten as There is ...
3
votes
4answers
28k views

“Started to work” vs “Started working”

What is the difference between the following: Things started to work again. Things started working again.
5
votes
1answer
359 views

Why was _to_ verb_+ing_ used in this case? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to use “to + V-ing”? “To hear” or “to hearing”? Samson had been a strong man prior to having his hair cut. From a grammatical point of view, when ...
3
votes
3answers
418 views

Using the gerund “Starting”

Does the gerund clause Starting in imply the future tense? For example, is this correct? Starting in January, 2012, we will use public transportation. Or is it proper to use the following: ...
7
votes
6answers
1k views

When was the word 'being' first used to refer to a human being or sentient being?

I am confused by the use of the word being to refer to a static thing. How can this word that appears to clearly be a verb gerund get turned around to be used as a thing?
7
votes
3answers
579 views

Is there the gerund of the verb “can”?

I would like translate a Portuguese phrase into English: Esta técnica é bem poderosa, podendo ser extendida para várias outras questões. In English I got: This technique is very powerful and ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

Which is correct, “summiting” or “summitting”?

This form of the word is not very common but does see some use as the present participle/gerund of "to summit" as in "Upon summit(t)ing the mountain we took photos but had to begin our descent ...
3
votes
2answers
311 views

“To handle certificates is…” vs. “handling certificates is…”

I have two equivalent sentences, intended for a brochure for a computer program. Which one is better? To handle certificates manually is time consuming and expensive. Handling certificates ...
5
votes
5answers
179 views

Is it widely accepted to use ‘gridiron’ as a verb and gerund?

Time magazine (September 30) carries the article titled “Christie to Watch Football” followed by the lead copy: “Garden Stater in no rush to decide, will mull while gridironing this weekend. AP ...
2
votes
1answer
12k views

“Canceling” or “cancelling” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is “L” doubled? I'm confused about the two spellings. In which contexts do I have to use canceling or cancelling? Google returns 15.6 million results ...
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votes
3answers
268 views

“The aims are promoting and protecting” vs. “the aims are to promote and protect”

Which of the following two constructions is correct? and why? Some of the important aims of the UNO are to promote peace and protect human rights. Some of the important aims of the UNO are ...
11
votes
2answers
37k views

How to use “to + V-ing”?

I saw some scenarios that used the structure "to + V-ing", such as the following: Looking forward to hearing. Disposed to using few words. I would like to apply what I learned in school to helping ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Why is “doing” used here instead of “to do”?

I have read this question: “I like to do (be) something” vs “I like doing (being) something” and I get (although the answer could not be applied to my example) that using "to do" means in general I ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “Forgive my being late” grammatical?

Is it grammatically correct to write "forgive my being late to this discussion" as an alternative to "sorry that I'm late to this discussion"?
6
votes
1answer
3k views

“I love to [verb]” vs “I love [gerund]” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: Catenatives followed by infinitives and gerunds “I like to do (be) something” vs “I like doing (being) something” What is the difference between "I love to sing" and ...
16
votes
3answers
3k views

Does a gerund always end with -ing? If so, why?

After asking what the difference is between a gerund and a participle, I began to wonder if all gerunds end with -ing, since I couldn't think of any that didn't. If they do, why?
5
votes
1answer
830 views

Why do we not include a possessive in “thank you for coming”, and include one in “thank you for *your* kindness”?

Why is it more correct to say "thank you for coming" than "thank you for your coming," but it's okay to say "thank you for your kindness," rather than "thank you for kindness"?
2
votes
1answer
531 views

On or upon + gerund

Which preposition are we supposed to use - on or upon. i.e. "On/upon closing the door, set the alarm on."
4
votes
2answers
680 views

Hyphen in the noun 'switching-off'? Or gerunds of compound verbs, more generally?

I'm currently proof-reading my girlfriend's Ph.D. thesis (neither of us are native speakers) and I came across the following sentence snippet: "the switching-off induces eddy currents", and the word ...
5
votes
4answers
695 views

Catenatives followed by infinitives and gerunds

I was wondering if anyone could please help me with this. What is the difference in meaning when the catenative verb “like” is followed by an infinitive, or by a gerund? For example: Do you like ski ...