A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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5
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1answer
896 views

Appositive phrase, participle phrase, gerund phrase and noun phrase. English is confusing

"Every English-speaking country is extremely sheepish towards mega-corporations and their puppet-governments. In continental Europe, France being an example, people stand up for their rights ...
0
votes
1answer
336 views

“Developed to [infinitive]” vs. “developed for [gerund]” [duplicate]

I am confused about when to use "to verb" and when to use "for verb+ing" constructs. For example what would be the proper construct for the following sentences extracted from scientific journals: ...
1
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2answers
3k views

Singular vs. Plural with Multiple Gerunds as Subject (IE: [Gerund] and [Gerund] are/is [something].)

I'm trying to find out whether I should use a singular or plural verb when there are multiple gerunds as the subject of the sentence. For example: Running the correct course and keeping a steady ...
0
votes
2answers
380 views

“Committed to supporting X” vs. “committed to support X” [duplicate]

I'm trying to edit a speech and found a commonly used phase which I'm not sure if I should amend it or not. The sentence goes like this: [a subject] is committed to supporting [a project]. ...
18
votes
6answers
3k views

When can the -ing form of a verb be placed before a noun?

My native-speaker's grammatical intuition tells me that: There is a sleeping man under the tree. is fine but There is a fishing man by the river bank. is wrong. Why? I've thought about ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

“Plan to do” vs. “plan on doing”

What are the differences between the following? He is planning to do something. He is planning on doing something. When to use each?
2
votes
1answer
337 views

How to form a gerund from “practise”?

I (think) I know the difference between practise (verb) and practice (non-verb). However, I am not sure which form I should use in cases like the following ones: I love practising the guitar. ...
2
votes
1answer
82 views

“A tool to do” vs. “a tool that does” vs. “a tool for doing”

I'm the curator of the Open Web Platform Daily Digest link. In the "Tools" section of each daily I write entries in this format: tool_name, tool_description For example: hapi, a server framework ...
3
votes
1answer
220 views

Gerund preceded by a genitive?

Is this sentence actually grammatical? You know your having a rough day when kittens don't even make you smile. The writer of this sentence may intend to mean you're instead of your but I'm just ...
0
votes
1answer
290 views

two nouns together

In every case where we find the word anointing(KJV) in the Old Testament it is from a Hebrew word that is a noun. Most of the time it is coupled with the word oil as in anointing oil. If I was ...
3
votes
2answers
419 views

Why is it “objections to moving”, not “objections to move”? [closed]

I got this sentence from the Economist: There are two primary objections to moving to the chained CPI. My question is, why have they used moving instead of move after objections to?
2
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1answer
316 views

Use of gerund without preposition “to”

Can I use gerunds with the word "concede" without using preposition "to" as in the sentence below? He concedes killing his wife.
2
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2answers
1k views

Is there a single-word noun for an overwhelming feeling that uses “overwhelm” as its root?

Is there a single-word noun for an overwhelming feeling that uses overwhelm as its root? My first thought was to make a gerund, that is, overwhelming. Although overwhelming is normally used as an ...
7
votes
3answers
619 views

Is there the gerund of the verb “can”?

I would like translate a Portuguese phrase into English: Esta técnica é bem poderosa, podendo ser extendida para várias outras questões. In English I got: This technique is very powerful and ...
-2
votes
1answer
1k views

When do we use “to” as an infinitive marker? [closed]

In these two sentences: I look forward to get. I look forward to getting it. Why is the first sentence incorrect? When do we use to as an infinitive marker?
0
votes
3answers
841 views

Why is a gerund used after the verb “confess to”

A simple form of the verb is often used after to, but sometimes the simple form is replaced by a gerund. For example: He confessed to having a secret admiration for his opponent. Edwards ...
16
votes
3answers
4k views

Does a gerund always end with -ing? If so, why?

After asking what the difference is between a gerund and a participle, I began to wonder if all gerunds end with -ing, since I couldn't think of any that didn't. If they do, why?
1
vote
2answers
314 views

Noun phrase after “show”

The following sentences all involve the verb "show" followed by a noun phrase. Number 6 sounds a bit weird, and the last one is just wrong — but why is that? The video shows the ...
24
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3answers
25k views

What's the difference between a gerund and a participle?

What is the difference between a gerund and a participle?
0
votes
3answers
219 views

“Attempts to acquaint” vs. “attempts at acquainting”

The research study is an eye-opener and attempts to acquaint/attempts at acquainting us with the problems of poor nations. For me, attempts to acquaint sounds more apt. But I am not sure ...
0
votes
3answers
730 views

Verb after preposition

Is it correct to write this: "... rely on emulating techniques"? I must write the emulate verb in gerund because it is preceded by an preposition, right? The whole sentence is: These systems ...
3
votes
2answers
319 views

“To handle certificates is…” vs. “handling certificates is…”

I have two equivalent sentences, intended for a brochure for a computer program. Which one is better? To handle certificates manually is time consuming and expensive. Handling certificates ...
1
vote
2answers
974 views

Bare infinitive and gerund participle

I saw him kick the stone. According to my reference book this sentence is grammatically correct even though the verb 'kick' is in present tense while the action has already happened. If I write ...
2
votes
2answers
210 views

“Weeks of rain/raining”? “Weeks of fight/fighting”? Is there a rule to use the gerund in those examples?

It’s common and correct to use both after two weeks of rain and after two weeks of fighting. But since fight is also a noun, couldn’t it be used instead of fighting? Also, why rain and not raining? ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

The correct use of “sundering”

I'm writing a book in which one of the major events is a day that separates two major forces in the world. It's meant to be a punishment from a high power, so at first I wanted to call it The Day of ...
1
vote
1answer
762 views

Is it necessary to use “the” before using verb+“ing” in specific contexts?

I am confused with whether it is necessary to use the before verbs in certain contexts. Like: The milking of a cow is not a painful process at all like you think. I am afraid it has never been ...
4
votes
1answer
360 views

“Work” vs. “working” (noun)

What are the differences between work and working when used as nouns? For example: Advocates claim that work/working brings a lot of benefits for young people. Which one is correct? I have ...
2
votes
1answer
243 views

Correct usage of infinitives

I am not sure about the usage of infinitives in this sentence: Finally, one of the accused confessed to have forged the director's signature on the report. Could anyone explain correct usage? ...
-1
votes
1answer
996 views

Past Perfect and gerund vs. Past Perfect and Simple Past [closed]

When using the past perfect tense to say something happened before something else, is it correct to use the gerund form (as opposed to the past tense) to express the latter event? For example, is it ...
5
votes
3answers
660 views

Ambiguity of “to be” + gerund

I would like to ask about a basic sentence that really confuses me. My favorite sport is swimming. I think it is strange. "Swimming" can be interpreted as a gerund ("I like to swim; it is my ...
2
votes
2answers
126 views

“Drag & dropping” or “Dragging & dropping”

"Drag & dropping" sounds better to me, but "Dragging & dropping" has more Google results... Which one is correct and why?
1
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2answers
847 views

Infinitive or Gerund for celebration of an event?

Which of the following sentences would be correct in a baby shower invitation. My grandparents are looking forward to celebrate my arrival in February. My grandparents are looking forward to ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Is this present participle or gerund? [closed]

Given the sentence: Most people who live and work near Washington, DC, would have trouble imagining dinosaurs walking around the area. Grammatically, what do they call it, ‘imaging’ in this case? ...
3
votes
3answers
464 views

Using the gerund “Starting”

Does the gerund clause Starting in imply the future tense? For example, is this correct? Starting in January, 2012, we will use public transportation. Or is it proper to use the following: ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

What is the difference between “dewatering” and “unwatering”

This report on the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy refers to the process of removing water as unwatering. However, I always thought that this process was called dewatering. What, if any, is the ...
2
votes
1answer
591 views

On or upon + gerund

Which preposition are we supposed to use - on or upon. i.e. "On/upon closing the door, set the alarm on."
4
votes
3answers
173 views

“Spell check” vs. “spelling check”

I can't remember the exact place I saw this (but I believe it was on another StackExchange site), but when someone was commenting on a software's "spell check" function, they said something to the ...
0
votes
5answers
78 views

Is using “get on developing” correct in this phrase?

You could get on developing this project and help me to add more features to that.
2
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4answers
560 views

What is the “, gerund” sentence called, and how can I improve it?

I'm proofreading a friend's paper, and she often creates sentences of the form: Sentence, gerund-phrase Examples: Consumers may question the legitimacy of producer actions, determining their ...
6
votes
4answers
386 views

Cooking apples and cleaning ladies

Consider the following sentences: Cooking is my favourite activity. Cooking apples are essential for this recipe. Cooking functions in the first sentence as a gerund. How does it function in the ...
1
vote
2answers
161 views

Is “solutioning” a correct word in a technical context? [closed]

I'm a translator from English into Italian language. While translating a British patent I found the following sentence: The large heat treatment window seen in the ThermoCalc simulation also ...
20
votes
3answers
2k views

The times they are a-changin'

I have always been intrigued by the word usage in the title of this Bob Dylan song. Wikipedia mentions that the song was influenced by Irish and Scottish ballads: Dylan recalled writing the song ...
1
vote
2answers
5k views

“Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming”

Consider "Thank you for coming" and "Thank you for your coming". Would the latter one be grammatical? Why? Is it possible to recognize latter "coming" as noun? Some say you need no pronoun because it ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

“Thank you for your coming” and “Thank you for your understanding” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming” The first one seems ungrammatical, as pointed by some of native speakers. But the latter ...
1
vote
2answers
201 views

“He remembered seeing a pocket compass […] and marveling/marveled”

Albert Einstein talked about what influenced his life as a scientist. He remembered seeing a pocket compass when he was five years old and (marveling/marveled) that the needle always pointed ...
2
votes
1answer
17k views

“Canceling” or “cancelling” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is “L” doubled? I'm confused about the two spellings. In which contexts do I have to use canceling or cancelling? Google returns 15.6 million results ...
25
votes
2answers
5k views

When is “L” doubled?

Some verbs can have double Ls in the gerund form; for example: modeling; modelling traveling; travelling Which form should we use, or which form is used more in the literature?
8
votes
3answers
1k views

Help identifying an error type “tried to help me learning”

I have a friend from Russia who is trying to learn English and recently used the sentence "He tried to help me learning..." (implied: the English language) It is obviously wrong and I corrected it ...
7
votes
3answers
169 views

“Comparing” vs “A comparison of ”

A professor criticized the language in a presentation. In particular he said that English preferred a noun phrase such as a comparison of  to a gerund such as comparing. For reference the entire ...
-1
votes
1answer
11k views

“Prefer to do something” vs. “prefer doing something” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should a verb be followed by a gerund instead of an infinitive? What's the difference between the two: What materials do they prefer working with? What ...