A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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3answers
154 views

“Watched them get married” vs “watched them getting married”

I read the following: The next day as I watched them get married... How does it differ from the following? Is one more eloquent and accurate than other? The next day as I watched them ...
4
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1answer
125 views

Is there a better term for “perfect infinitive”, “perfect participle” or “perfect gerund”?

BACKGROUND There are grammar terms such as 'present perfect' and 'past perfect' as in: She has learned English for 10 years. [present perfect] She had learned English when she was little. ...
4
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2answers
410 views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
3
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5answers
942 views

Infinitive vs. present participle (time relations)

I was told that one of the following refers to the past and the other to the future. I cannot decide which is which and would appreciate it if someone could explain the difference between these ...
3
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5answers
4k views

What's the difference between an -ing noun and a real noun

Some verbs have corresponding nouns. Also, an '-ing' can be added to create a new noun. For example: Develop is a verb. Development is a noun. Developing is also a noun. So are the sentences ...
3
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8answers
1k views

How to remember the difference between: “Can you try to open” and “Can you try opening”?

I am well aware that a similar question has been asked in the past, namely “Try to save” or “try saving”. However, I am not totally satisfied by the posted answers. My problem is that, every time I ...
3
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3answers
323 views

Is “to practice volleyball requires stamina” grammatical?

Is the sentence "to practice volleyball requires stamina" grammatically correct? As opposed to the sentence "practicing volleyball requires stamina"? Another example: To ensure safety ...
3
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3answers
1k views

“For [verb]ing” vs “to [verb]”

Someone edited my message on StackOverflow, but it really bugs me out. I'm not sure what's wrong with it: As you see, the bigger the circle becomes, the more vertices I need for hiding the straight ...
3
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2answers
378 views

“To handle certificates is…” vs. “handling certificates is…”

I have two equivalent sentences, intended for a brochure for a computer program. Which one is better? To handle certificates manually is time consuming and expensive. Handling certificates ...
3
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3answers
1k views

one's way of V-ing / one's way to V / a/the way of V-ing / a/the way to V

There are some options when you use the word way and some verb together: (1) a. There are some way of writing.       b. There are some way to write. Is there any ...
3
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2answers
829 views

Why is it “objections to moving”, not “objections to move”? [closed]

I got this sentence from the Economist: There are two primary objections to moving to the chained CPI. My question is, why have they used moving instead of move after objections to?
3
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1answer
351 views

Gerund preceded by a genitive?

Is this sentence actually grammatical? You know your having a rough day when kittens don't even make you smile. The writer of this sentence may intend to mean you're instead of your but I'm just ...
3
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4answers
1k views

What is the difference between “dewatering” and “unwatering”

This report on the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy refers to the process of removing water as unwatering. However, I always thought that this process was called dewatering. What, if any, is the ...
3
votes
2answers
121 views

Using 'better' as an adverb before a gerund

I recently used the following headline in a document: Better Managing Your Health Means Better Managing Your Life My boss wrote back that "better managing" is not grammatically correct. She's wrong, ...
3
votes
3answers
582 views

Using the gerund “Starting”

Does the gerund clause Starting in imply the future tense? For example, is this correct? Starting in January, 2012, we will use public transportation. Or is it proper to use the following: ...
3
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2answers
197 views

Are expressions like “When studying, When playing, …” just expressions or something more?

My first question here. I am wondering whether expressions like the ones in the tittle are just expressions or represent another thing in the english language. I will give you some more examples so ...
3
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3answers
288 views

Gerund ending in -ings?

Examples: Savings Shavings Drippings Are these gerunds? I found some resources (below) that don't seem to provide definitive answers. Page 57 Page 320
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2answers
6k views

Singular vs. Plural with Multiple Gerunds as Subject (IE: [Gerund] and [Gerund] are/is [something].)

I'm trying to find out whether I should use a singular or plural verb when there are multiple gerunds as the subject of the sentence. For example: Running the correct course and keeping a steady ...
3
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3answers
566 views

Pure verbal nouns/deverbal nouns vs. gerunds

This is a follow-up to a previous question which I am still trying to understand. I think I'm making progress in my understanding, but I would appreciate feedback to help me refine my thinking. Here ...
3
votes
1answer
32k views

“Canceling” or “cancelling” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is “L” doubled? I'm confused about the two spellings. In which contexts do I have to use canceling or cancelling? Google returns 15.6 million results ...
3
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4answers
14k views

“Plan to do” vs. “plan on doing”

What are the differences between the following? He is planning to do something. He is planning on doing something. When to use each?
2
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2answers
4k views

Grammatical complements for “allow”

Are any of these verb phrases grammatical? allows the user of modeling and resolving allows the user to model and resolve Which version of the following sentence is correct/better? ...
2
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2answers
2k views

Using the gerund two times in a row

When you have this construct: . . . is a key factor in the making and controlling of the water. Should you leave only the last verb in the gerund: . . . is a key factor in the make and ...
2
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1answer
2k views

in order to [gerund] or [infinitive]?

There are few questions and answer on the choice of gerund versus infinitive. From what I understand, when conveying a purpose the infinitive should be used: I use my key in order to open the ...
2
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2answers
143 views

“Drag & dropping” or “Dragging & dropping”

"Drag & dropping" sounds better to me, but "Dragging & dropping" has more Google results... Which one is correct and why?
2
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3answers
997 views

Progressive form required for “as”, “while”, etc.?

Are both forms grammatically correct? As I was entering the shop, I saw her. As I entered the shop, I saw her.
2
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5answers
575 views

“stop to do something” vs. “continue to do something”

A transcript of a recent speech by Barack Obama contains the following sentence: Boston police, firefighters, and first responders as well as the National Guard responded heroically, and continue ...
2
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3answers
766 views

Which one should I use (“suggesting” or “to suggest”) in the example provided?

I can’t find anything suggesting that one cannot take out principle from Roth IRA account for education or housing purchases. Nor it’s indicated that money are doled out in a form of a loan. Part ...
2
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2answers
266 views

“Weeks of rain/raining”? “Weeks of fight/fighting”? Is there a rule to use the gerund in those examples?

It’s common and correct to use both after two weeks of rain and after two weeks of fighting. But since fight is also a noun, couldn’t it be used instead of fighting? Also, why rain and not raining? ...
2
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1answer
308 views

Correct usage of infinitives

I am not sure about the usage of infinitives in this sentence: Finally, one of the accused confessed to have forged the director's signature on the report. Could anyone explain correct usage? ...
2
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3answers
5k views

Proper usage of “is” and “are” when specifying multiple nouns

This is one thing I never really bothered looking into, but have always been unsure of. punching, kicking, slapping or slashing [is/are] strictly prohibited That's what I'm trying to determine. ...
2
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2answers
259 views

Which tense should I use in this situation? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using the gerund two times in a row Here is the sentence: Just as on smoking, voices now come from many quarters (insisting or insist) that the science about ...
2
votes
2answers
14k views

Expect +to VS expect + ing

I know that expect is used this way: I expect you to do that. But I have also seen examples like with verb in its "ing" form: > What to expect working at... > I will expect you doing ...
2
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3answers
861 views

Proper Usage of gerund form of the verb [closed]

So, I want to title a talk. Which of these is the right usage and why? "Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to solve them" OR "Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to ...
2
votes
2answers
81 views

What's the plural of “picking up”?

I'm writing in the context of ice skating. This is the sentence I wish to construct: There will be many falls, but serious injuries are rare, and picking ups are easy. "picking up" is the ...
2
votes
4answers
656 views

Can I use the word “promise” with gerund?

Is it possible to use gerund after the verb "promise"? For example, in the sentence "He promised cleaning the window. I'd prefer to say: He promised to clean the window. But today I was told that this ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

“A tool to do” vs. “a tool that does” vs. “a tool for doing”

I'm the curator of the Open Web Platform Daily Digest link. In the "Tools" section of each daily I write entries in this format: tool_name, tool_description For example: hapi, a server framework ...
2
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3answers
731 views

Noun or non-finite subordinate clause?

Consider the following sentence: The government wants to encourage understanding of science. Now, "to encourage understanding of science" is a non-finite subordinate clause functioning as an ...
2
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1answer
783 views

On or upon + gerund

Which preposition are we supposed to use - on or upon. i.e. "On/upon closing the door, set the alarm on."
2
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1answer
66 views

A question about “to becoming” [duplicate]

Would this sentence be correct? Being scared is the first step to becoming free. The more I look at it, the less clear it becomes.
2
votes
1answer
5k views

a good job (of / in / at) doing something

Are the following sentences correct? If so, which is the most common? 1) You did a good job raising your children. 2) You did a good job of raising your children. 3) You did a good job in ...
2
votes
1answer
184 views

Noun verbs a-gerunding - the meaning of the “a-gerund” form?

The first time I saw this antiquated form was in Steeleye Span's interpretation of The Elf Knight ballad, but I tend to see it now and then and I don't quite know how it is used. Lady Isabel sits ...
2
votes
1answer
581 views

How to form a gerund from “practise”?

I (think) I know the difference between practise (verb) and practice (non-verb). However, I am not sure which form I should use in cases like the following ones: I love practising the guitar. ...
2
votes
4answers
649 views

What is the “, gerund” sentence called, and how can I improve it?

I'm proofreading a friend's paper, and she often creates sentences of the form: Sentence, gerund-phrase Examples: Consumers may question the legitimacy of producer actions, determining their ...
2
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1answer
28 views

Possessive followed by negative gerund

Is it correct to say this? Her not paying attention to the class annoys me.
2
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1answer
10k views

Any difference between “Sorry I'm late!” and “Sorry for being late!”?

Is one of these sentences used more than the other? (I'm) sorry I'm late. (I'm) sorry for being late. Or is one more formal than the other?
2
votes
1answer
858 views

What is the function of “doing” in “when doing something”?

Can anyone please explain if "doing" in "When doing something" is a base+ing verbal, or a present participle used as a verb in an elliptical sentence, or something else entirely. Here's an example of ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

“Having not” vs “not having”

I did a bit of searching on the difference between "not having" and "having not", but I could not find a convincing argument. I typed this sentence; Congratulations on not having given up yet! ...
2
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2answers
2k views

Is there a single-word noun for an overwhelming feeling that uses “overwhelm” as its root?

Is there a single-word noun for an overwhelming feeling that uses overwhelm as its root? My first thought was to make a gerund, that is, overwhelming. Although overwhelming is normally used as an ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

The correct use of “sundering”

I'm writing a book in which one of the major events is a day that separates two major forces in the world. It's meant to be a punishment from a high power, so at first I wanted to call it The Day of ...