A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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Indirect objects that answer the question “by whom”

Here is a sentence from Chapter Seventeen of Huckleberry Finn. The sentence appears in a grammar worksheet: When I got to the three log doorsteps I heard them unlocking and unbarring and ...
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Hyphen in the noun 'switching-off'? Or gerunds of compound verbs, more generally?

I'm currently proof-reading my girlfriend's Ph.D. thesis (neither of us are native speakers) and I came across the following sentence snippet: "the switching-off induces eddy currents", and the word ...
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625 views

Translating Gerunds from Spanish to English (verb+ing)

In Spanish, the gerund form (-ando, -endo) is frequently used adverbially to modify and describe the verb: El alma es dichosa dando y sirviendo. El niño anda bailando. El artista vive provocando ...
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“Work” vs. “working” (noun)

What are the differences between work and working when used as nouns? For example: Advocates claim that work/working brings a lot of benefits for young people. Which one is correct? I have ...
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215 views

Why the word building is used insead of using built?

We used to say the word as building. Generally, we use the gerund form in the present continuous tense. Why are we using the word building when it is already built?
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Singular vs. Plural with Multiple Gerunds as Subject (IE: [Gerund] and [Gerund] are/is [something].)

I'm trying to find out whether I should use a singular or plural verb when there are multiple gerunds as the subject of the sentence. For example: Running the correct course and keeping a steady ...
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3answers
640 views

“Spell check” vs. “spelling check”

I can't remember the exact place I saw this (but I believe it was on another StackExchange site), but when someone was commenting on a software's "spell check" function, they said something to the ...
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1answer
138 views

Is “programming” not a noun?

Recently, I was told that the word "programming" in the phrase "programming thoughts" is a verb in the gerund-participle form and that the term "gerund" by itself is obsolete in modern grammar. I was ...
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11k views

a good job (of / in / at) doing something

Are the following sentences correct? If so, which is the most common? 1) You did a good job raising your children. 2) You did a good job of raising your children. 3) You did a good job in ...
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1answer
313 views

Is there a better term for “perfect infinitive”, “perfect participle” or “perfect gerund”?

BACKGROUND There are grammar terms such as 'present perfect' and 'past perfect' as in: She has learned English for 10 years. [present perfect] She had learned English when she was little. ...
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825 views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
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Infinitive vs. present participle (time relations)

I was told that one of the following refers to the past and the other to the future. I cannot decide which is which and would appreciate it if someone could explain the difference between these ...
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What's the difference between an -ing noun and a real noun

Some verbs have corresponding nouns. Also, an '-ing' can be added to create a new noun. For example: Develop is a verb. Development is a noun. Developing is also a noun. So are the sentences ...
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388 views

Is “to practice volleyball requires stamina” grammatical?

Is the sentence "to practice volleyball requires stamina" grammatically correct? As opposed to the sentence "practicing volleyball requires stamina"? Another example: To ensure safety ...
3
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2answers
127 views

Nobody was surprised at John being absent (present participle or gerund?)

Some time ago I learned the difference between Present Participle and Gerund and today I decided to pass any online test to make sure I get it. So, I passed it having made the only mistake which is ...
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3answers
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“For [verb]ing” vs “to [verb]”

Someone edited my message on StackOverflow, but it really bugs me out. I'm not sure what's wrong with it: As you see, the bigger the circle becomes, the more vertices I need for hiding the straight ...
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2answers
500 views

“To handle certificates is…” vs. “handling certificates is…”

I have two equivalent sentences, intended for a brochure for a computer program. Which one is better? To handle certificates manually is time consuming and expensive. Handling certificates ...
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one's way of V-ing / one's way to V / a/the way of V-ing / a/the way to V

There are some options when you use the word way and some verb together: (1) a. There are some way of writing.       b. There are some way to write. Is there any ...
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try + ing vs. try to + infinitive [duplicate]

Which sentence is correct: Why don't you try to give up candy if you want to lose some weight? Why don't you try giving up candy if you want to lose some weight?
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Why is it “objections to moving”, not “objections to move”? [closed]

I got this sentence from the Economist: There are two primary objections to moving to the chained CPI. My question is, why have they used moving instead of move after objections to?
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Expect +to VS expect + ing

I know that expect is used this way: I expect you to do that. But I have also seen examples like with verb in its "ing" form: > What to expect working at... > I will expect you doing ...
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4answers
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Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
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1answer
500 views

Gerund preceded by a genitive?

Is this sentence actually grammatical? You know your having a rough day when kittens don't even make you smile. The writer of this sentence may intend to mean you're instead of your but I'm just ...
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2answers
627 views

Is “hanging bats” a participial phrase, gerund phrase, or simple noun phrase?

In the sentence "Hanging bats populate most of the caves in North America," what is the role of "hanging bats"? I believe it is a simple noun phrase containing the participle "hanging" (which ...
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4answers
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What is the difference between “dewatering” and “unwatering”

This report on the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy refers to the process of removing water as unwatering. However, I always thought that this process was called dewatering. What, if any, is the ...
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457 views

Using 'better' as an adverb before a gerund

I recently used the following headline in a document: Better Managing Your Health Means Better Managing Your Life My boss wrote back that "better managing" is not grammatically correct. She's wrong, ...
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Using the gerund “Starting”

Does the gerund clause Starting in imply the future tense? For example, is this correct? Starting in January, 2012, we will use public transportation. Or is it proper to use the following: ...
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202 views

Are expressions like “When studying, When playing, …” just expressions or something more?

My first question here. I am wondering whether expressions like the ones in the tittle are just expressions or represent another thing in the english language. I will give you some more examples so ...
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Pure verbal nouns/deverbal nouns vs. gerunds

This is a follow-up to a previous question which I am still trying to understand. I think I'm making progress in my understanding, but I would appreciate feedback to help me refine my thinking. Here ...
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Grammatical complements for “allow”

Are any of these verb phrases grammatical? allows the user of modeling and resolving allows the user to model and resolve Which version of the following sentence is correct/better? ...
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2answers
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Using the gerund two times in a row

When you have this construct: . . . is a key factor in the making and controlling of the water. Should you leave only the last verb in the gerund: . . . is a key factor in the make and ...
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1answer
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in order to [gerund] or [infinitive]?

There are few questions and answer on the choice of gerund versus infinitive. From what I understand, when conveying a purpose the infinitive should be used: I use my key in order to open the ...
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416 views

“Drag & dropping” or “Dragging & dropping”

"Drag & dropping" sounds better to me, but "Dragging & dropping" has more Google results... Which one is correct and why?
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Progressive form required for “as”, “while”, etc.?

Are both forms grammatically correct? As I was entering the shop, I saw her. As I entered the shop, I saw her.
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792 views

“stop to do something” vs. “continue to do something”

A transcript of a recent speech by Barack Obama contains the following sentence: Boston police, firefighters, and first responders as well as the National Guard responded heroically, and continue ...
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2answers
127 views

Difference between gerund and present participle [duplicate]

What is the difference between a gerund and present participle? When should we use a gerund and when should we use a present participle ?
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Which one should I use (“suggesting” or “to suggest”) in the example provided?

I can’t find anything suggesting that one cannot take out principle from Roth IRA account for education or housing purchases. Nor it’s indicated that money are doled out in a form of a loan. Part ...
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1answer
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The “to~” infinitive always implies the future, except for preference Like and Love

A fellow teacher said to me that the to~ infinitive always implies the future..."to eat", "to swim" etc. I disagreed and said that I thought it was abstract and had no tense in of itself. He pointed ...
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2answers
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“Weeks of rain/raining”? “Weeks of fight/fighting”? Is there a rule to use the gerund in those examples?

It’s common and correct to use both after two weeks of rain and after two weeks of fighting. But since fight is also a noun, couldn’t it be used instead of fighting? Also, why rain and not raining? ...
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1answer
357 views

Correct usage of infinitives

I am not sure about the usage of infinitives in this sentence: Finally, one of the accused confessed to have forged the director's signature on the report. Could anyone explain correct usage? ...
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3answers
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When to use the gerund form of a verb after “to”?

I would like to understand when to use the gerund form of a verb after "to." I had in my mind that every verb used after "to" was in its infinitive form, like for example: It is hard to play the ...
2
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1answer
120 views

Subject Verb Possessive Gerund problem: “He had me do this” vs “He had my doing this”

I know this sounds awkward, but in sentences such as "He said me being here was wonderful," it's obviously grammatically incorrect to say "me being here." It should be "my being" because we need to ...
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3answers
104 views

Main verb in a sentence and gerund

In the sentence "Offering her license and registration, Selena sobbed in the driver's seat," offering is not a gerund, right? It isn't a noun and does not act as a subject. That made me wonder if the ...
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571 views

Gerund ending in -ings?

Examples: Savings Shavings Drippings Are these gerunds? I found some resources (below) that don't seem to provide definitive answers. Page 57 Page 320
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Proper usage of “is” and “are” when specifying multiple nouns

This is one thing I never really bothered looking into, but have always been unsure of. punching, kicking, slapping or slashing [is/are] strictly prohibited That's what I'm trying to determine. ...
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2answers
296 views

Which tense should I use in this situation? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using the gerund two times in a row Here is the sentence: Just as on smoking, voices now come from many quarters (insisting or insist) that the science about ...
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3answers
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Using gerund: “applying” or “on applying”?

In a mathematical paper my co-author wrote: "On applying s to the coefficients of the polynomials defining our variety X, we obtain a new variety sX". The anonymous referee suggested a correction: ...
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2answers
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What's the plural of “picking up”?

I'm writing in the context of ice skating. This is the sentence I wish to construct: There will be many falls, but serious injuries are rare, and picking ups are easy. "picking up" is the ...
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4answers
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Can I use the word “promise” with gerund?

Is it possible to use gerund after the verb "promise"? For example, in the sentence "He promised cleaning the window. I'd prefer to say: He promised to clean the window. But today I was told that this ...
2
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1answer
227 views

“A tool to do” vs. “a tool that does” vs. “a tool for doing”

I'm the curator of the Open Web Platform Daily Digest link. In the "Tools" section of each daily I write entries in this format: tool_name, tool_description For example: hapi, a server framework ...