A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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11
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4answers
24k views

“I like to do (be) something” vs “I like doing (being) something”

This is what I read in an answer to a previous question: Verbs Followed by Either Gerund or Infinitive Sometimes the meaning changes according to the verb used. <…> (dis)like ...
14
votes
2answers
2k views

How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive?

As a native speaker of English, the gerund version of this sentence sounds better: infinitive: When used together in chains, extension methods are an unprecedented tool to produce extremely ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Is this participle or gerund? [closed]

"Disturbed, she consulted her doctor about the symptoms."
0
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2answers
135 views

'engaged in developing' or 'engaged in the development of'?

XXX is engaged in developing and commercializing therapies for the treatment of Alzheimer's patients. or XXX is engaged in the development and commercialization of therapies for the ...
4
votes
2answers
268 views

Translating Gerunds from Spanish to English (verb+ing)

In Spanish, the gerund form (-ando, -endo) is frequently used adverbially to modify and describe the verb: El alma es dichosa dando y sirviendo. El niño anda bailando. El artista vive provocando ...
0
votes
1answer
321 views

verbs not followed by that clauses

Where can I find a list of verbs like 'to want', which must be followed by an infinitive (other verbs by a gerund), but cannot be followed by a that-clause? I got from your website that there are ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

Difference between “is to do” and “is doing” [duplicate]

I saw below sentence: Her job is to clean the hall. So can I also say like: Her job is cleaning the hall. It's present participle or gerund? What's the different meaning between these two ...
0
votes
3answers
59 views

What does “a-building” modify? [duplicate]

"The city was a thousand years a-building." What does "a-building" (in building) modify in that sentence?
0
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1answer
181 views

Compound verbs with infinitive and gerund

Which statements are grammatically correct and which meaning do they convey, This concept helps understand the problem. This concept helps to understand the problem. This concept helps understanding ...
1
vote
2answers
519 views

Should there be a gerund or a noun in front of the preposition?

(a) The rise of price of goods burdens the people. (b) The rising of price of goods burdens the people. (c) The ban of plastic bags is a good way to reduce environmental problems. ...
4
votes
2answers
129 views

Why the word building is used insead of using built?

We used to say the word as building. Generally, we use the gerund form in the present continuous tense. Why are we using the word building when it is already built?
1
vote
4answers
624 views

Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

“Was talking” vs. “Has been talking”

An online instructor was asked by a student at the end of their conversation: Which of the following is correct and why? It was nice talking to you. It has been nice talking to you. Is talking a ...
0
votes
2answers
155 views

To see them play and to see them playing

Excuse my limited acquaintance on English usage; which sentence is grammatically correct, and if any, which meaning do they convey to ? I saw them play chess. I saw then playing chess. Many ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

Any difference between “Sorry I'm late!” and “Sorry for being late!”?

Is one of these sentences used more than the other? (I'm) sorry I'm late. (I'm) sorry for being late. Or is one more formal than the other?
2
votes
1answer
2k views

in order to [gerund] or [infinitive]?

There are few questions and answer on the choice of gerund versus infinitive. From what I understand, when conveying a purpose the infinitive should be used: I use my key in order to open the ...
1
vote
1answer
87 views

In «In addition to *his being a great writer*,» what is «his being a great writer»?

Is that a gerund-like construction? A noun phrase? What kind of part of speech is that? I apologize in advance if there is some thread that already deals with this issue, but since I don't really know ...
0
votes
1answer
152 views

gerunds: difference between “on doing”, “by doing”, and “in doing”?

What is the difference between "on doing", "by doing", and "in doing"? A difficult point to French learners of English as in all three cases, you would say "en faisant". Example sentences, taken ...
0
votes
1answer
282 views

try + ing vs. try to + infinitive [duplicate]

Which sentence is correct: Why don't you try to give up candy if you want to lose some weight? Why don't you try giving up candy if you want to lose some weight?
-4
votes
1answer
72 views

Using knock and knocking

For a Halloween event, I dressed up as a student, knocked on my teacher's doors, and received extra homework. Can this sentence be rewritten using knocking? Is the following grammatically ...
-3
votes
1answer
487 views

to be p.p. or being p.p.?AND WHY? [closed]

Would you kindly tell me the difference between the following? She likes to be looked at. She likes being looked at.
1
vote
1answer
212 views

something is capable of to be p.p. or being p.p.? [closed]

Manual: small, helpful book capable of being carried in the hand. What is the difference between to be carried and being carried in this sentence?
0
votes
1answer
985 views

Provide to somebody to do/doing or Provide for somebody to do/doing?

I'm writing a letter to my teacher to thank her for letting me put on a party, but I'm confused by these: I would like to thank somebody for your support, guidance and encouragement, and for the ...
3
votes
5answers
2k views

What's the difference between an -ing noun and a real noun

Some verbs have corresponding nouns. Also, an '-ing' can be added to create a new noun. For example: Develop is a verb. Development is a noun. Developing is also a noun. So are the sentences ...
0
votes
1answer
196 views

Meaning of “my having completed my packing” [closed]

I ran into this in a novel: This expedition began this morning almost an hour later than I had planned, despite my having completed my packing, and loaded the Ford with all necessary items well ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

a good job (of / in / at) doing something

Are the following sentences correct? If so, which is the most common? 1) You did a good job raising your children. 2) You did a good job of raising your children. 3) You did a good job in ...
7
votes
6answers
2k views

When was the word 'being' first used to refer to a human being or sentient being?

I am confused by the use of the word being to refer to a static thing. How can this word that appears to clearly be a verb gerund get turned around to be used as a thing?
1
vote
1answer
561 views

to be certain to do something versus to be certain of doing something

"Paul is certain to win the race." "Paul is certain of winning the race." What is the difference between these two sentences?
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Reasons to choose / for choosing [duplicate]

There are many reasons to choose X or There are many reasons for choosing X Are these sentences equivalent/interchangeable?
-1
votes
2answers
1k views

“Feel committed to [gerund/infinitive]”

Does "feel committed to" require an infinitive or gerund complement? For example, which of the following is grammatical? I feel committed to following up on that. I feel committed to follow ...
1
vote
1answer
656 views

“Recommend to have” vs. “recommend having” [duplicate]

I am writing my bachelor dissertation and several times Microsoft Word has corrected me from "to have" to "having". One of the sentences, for instance, goes like this: The author recommends to ...
0
votes
1answer
591 views

“Needs repairing” vs. “needs to be repaired” [duplicate]

Do the following two sentences mean the same thing? If so, which is more commonly used? My car needs repairing. My car needs to be repaired.
-1
votes
1answer
459 views

“Needs to be repaired” vs. “needs repairing” [duplicate]

Is there any difference in meaning between the following two sentences? My car needs to be repaired. My car needs reparing.
4
votes
4answers
37k views

“Started to work” vs “Started working”

What is the difference between the following: Things started to work again. Things started working again.
0
votes
0answers
41 views

infinitive and gerund [duplicate]

Are the following sentences equivalent in meaning? To play the flute takes a lot of effort. Playing the flute takes a lot of effort. I know that we say "It takes a lot of effort to play ...
0
votes
2answers
106 views

Participles? Present participles? Are they nouns too? [duplicate]

A participle is just a infinitive verb + ing right? A participle is also used as an adjective a lot of the time right? For ex: "She looks at the rising sun". The present participle here is an ...
0
votes
2answers
116 views

Is Vouchering a valid synonym for “time booking” or not?

I have an ongoing dispute with someone who insists on using "Vouchering" in official documents as a synonym for "time booking" - (as in making entries on a time management system against booking ...
-1
votes
1answer
61 views

To repair bicycle is his job. Vs. Repairing bicycle is his job

My question is what the differences are between the two sentences. In what situation do you use infinitive as a subject? And when do you use gerund as a subjective? Thanks a lot!
2
votes
1answer
493 views

What is the function of “doing” in “when doing something”?

Can anyone please explain if "doing" in "When doing something" is a base+ing verbal, or a present participle used as a verb in an elliptical sentence, or something else entirely. Here's an example of ...
1
vote
2answers
318 views

Why is “thought” (verb III) a noun in “Nice thought”? [closed]

I often hear someone says, "Wow, that's such a nice thought!" Movies and books often have that kind of dialogue as well. As I figure it out, "a nice thought" is a noun phrase. Which means "nice" is ...
0
votes
3answers
529 views

Can “once” and “since” be followed by a V-ing clause?

Consider these examples: Since the board realized that the figures are increasing, they have been searching for a new campaign. Once the board realized that the figures are increasing, they ...
1
vote
1answer
187 views

Usage of “being” in “I am always afraid of being bitten”

Does anybody know what 'being' means in the below statement? I don't like dogs. I am always afraid of being bitten. Why is being used in this statement? It looks like a passive statement, but if ...
0
votes
1answer
111 views

“I see it moving/move”

Basically what't the difference between these two forms in all regards? What do I use? From my native language I've got this habit to always go gerund.
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“… need XXX-ing” vs. “… need to be XXX-ed” [duplicate]

What is the difference between these two expressions? Your hair needs brushing. Your hair needs to be brushed.
2
votes
3answers
4k views

Proper usage of “is” and “are” when specifying multiple nouns

This is one thing I never really bothered looking into, but have always been unsure of. punching, kicking, slapping or slashing [is/are] strictly prohibited That's what I'm trying to determine. ...
0
votes
1answer
556 views

I am looking forward to …? (followed by a Gerund)?

I know, that I am looking forward to hearing from you. is correct. But I am not sure, if this holds also for other verbs? So is I am looking forward to taste your cookies. or is I ...
5
votes
4answers
831 views

Usage of the gerund preceded by the possessive pronoun

I read this thread on the usage of the gerund preceded by the possessive pronoun with much interest. I have another question about the usage of the gerund preceded by the possessive pronoun. In a ...
1
vote
1answer
240 views

What is the correct name for this particular unclear-subject error?

An example: the sentence "Upon finishing these books, I think the reader has a new perspective on history." Taken literally, it could mean that "I, upon finishing these books, think..." Or it ...
3
votes
5answers
740 views

Infinitive vs. present participle (time relations)

I was told that one of the following refers to the past and the other to the future. I cannot decide which is which and would appreciate it if someone could explain the difference between these ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

“Suggest to go” vs. “suggest going”

I took an English assessment test online and this was my answer: Someone suggested to go for a walk. My answer was wrong and this was the correct sentence: Someone suggested going for a ...