0
votes
1answer
67 views

Compound verbs with infinitive and gerund

Which statements are grammatically correct and which meaning do they convey, This concept helps understand the problem. This concept helps to understand the problem. This concept helps understanding ...
1
vote
4answers
125 views

Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Difference between “is to do” and “is doing” [duplicate]

I saw below sentence: Her job is to clean the hall. So can I also say like: Her job is cleaning the hall. It's present participle or gerund? What's the different meaning between these two ...
-3
votes
1answer
201 views

to be p.p. or being p.p.?AND WHY? [closed]

Would you kindly tell me the difference between the following? She likes to be looked at. She likes being looked at.
1
vote
1answer
97 views

something is capable of to be p.p. or being p.p.?

Manual: small, helpful book capable of being carried in the hand. What is the difference between to be carried and being carried in this sentence?
0
votes
1answer
407 views

Provide to somebody to do/doing or Provide for somebody to do/doing?

I'm writing a letter to my teacher to thank her for letting me put on a party, but I'm confused by these: I would like to thank somebody for your support, guidance and encouragement, and for the ...
1
vote
1answer
264 views

to be certain to do something versus to be certain of doing something

"Paul is certain to win the race." "Paul is certain of winning the race." What is the difference between these two sentences?
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Reasons to choose / for choosing [duplicate]

There are many reasons to choose X or There are many reasons for choosing X Are these sentences equivalent/interchangeable?
1
vote
1answer
199 views

“Recommend to have” vs. “recommend having” [duplicate]

I am writing my bachelor dissertation and several times Microsoft Word has corrected me from "to have" to "having". One of the sentences, for instance, goes like this: The author recommends to ...
-1
votes
1answer
149 views

“Needs to be repaired” vs. “needs repairing” [duplicate]

Is there any difference in meaning between the following two sentences? My car needs to be repaired. My car needs reparing.
0
votes
0answers
38 views

infinitive and gerund [duplicate]

Are the following sentences equivalent in meaning? To play the flute takes a lot of effort. Playing the flute takes a lot of effort. I know that we say "It takes a lot of effort to play ...
0
votes
1answer
203 views

verbs not followed by that clauses

Where can I find a list of verbs like 'to want', which must be followed by an infinitive (other verbs by a gerund), but cannot be followed by a that-clause? I got from your website that there are ...
-1
votes
1answer
48 views

To repair bicycle is his job. Vs. Repairing bicycle is his job

My question is what the differences are between the two sentences. In what situation do you use infinitive as a subject? And when do you use gerund as a subjective? Thanks a lot!
0
votes
1answer
228 views

“Needs repairing” vs. “needs to be repaired” [duplicate]

Do the following two sentences mean the same thing? If so, which is more commonly used? My car needs repairing. My car needs to be repaired.
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“… need XXX-ing” vs. “… need to be XXX-ed” [duplicate]

What is the difference between these two expressions? Your hair needs brushing. Your hair needs to be brushed.
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“Suggest to go” vs. “suggest going”

I took an English assessment test online and this was my answer: Someone suggested to go for a walk. My answer was wrong and this was the correct sentence: Someone suggested going for a ...
-1
votes
1answer
164 views

“Looking to + infinitive” vs “Looking to + gerund” [closed]

Which is the correct expression, looking to build or looking to building? Whether you are looking to build. . . . or Whether you are looking to building. . . .
2
votes
1answer
689 views

“To see” vs “seeing” [duplicate]

Which of the following is grammatical? To see my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! Seeing my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! The verb "to see" is ...
1
vote
1answer
191 views

“Committed to build” vs. “committed to building”

If this were a mere tagline, not a complete sentence in a full paragraph, which would be more correct? Committed to build a better world Committed to building a better world
4
votes
3answers
375 views

How to remember the difference between: “Can you try to open this jar?” and “Can you try opening this jar?”

I am well aware that a similar question has been asked in the past, namely “Try to save” or “try saving”. However, I am not totally satisfied by the posted answers. My problem is that, every time I ...
0
votes
1answer
232 views

“Developed to [infinitive]” vs. “developed for [gerund]” [duplicate]

I am confused about when to use "to verb" and when to use "for verb+ing" constructs. For example what would be the proper construct for the following sentences extracted from scientific journals: ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

“Plan to do” vs. “plan on doing”

What are the differences between the following? He is planning to do something. He is planning on doing something. When to use each?
1
vote
1answer
74 views

“A tool to do” vs. “a tool that does” vs. “a tool for doing”

I'm the curator of the Open Web Platform Daily Digest link. In the "Tools" section of each daily I write entries in this format: tool_name, tool_description For example: hapi, a server framework ...
0
votes
2answers
282 views

“Committed to supporting X” vs. “committed to support X” [duplicate]

I'm trying to edit a speech and found a commonly used phase which I'm not sure if I should amend it or not. The sentence goes like this: [a subject] is committed to supporting [a project]. ...
1
vote
5answers
362 views

“stop to do something” vs. “continue to do something”

A transcript of a recent speech by Barack Obama contains the following sentence: Boston police, firefighters, and first responders as well as the National Guard responded heroically, and continue ...
3
votes
3answers
264 views

Is “to practice volleyball requires stamina” grammatical?

Is the sentence "to practice volleyball requires stamina" grammatically correct? As opposed to the sentence "practicing volleyball requires stamina"? Another example: To ensure safety ...
-2
votes
1answer
860 views

When do we use “to” as an infinitive marker? [closed]

In these two sentences: I look forward to get. I look forward to getting it. Why is the first sentence incorrect? When do we use to as an infinitive marker?
0
votes
3answers
680 views

Why is a gerund used after the verb “confess to”

A simple form of the verb is often used after to, but sometimes the simple form is replaced by a gerund. For example: He confessed to having a secret admiration for his opponent. Edwards ...
3
votes
5answers
632 views

Infinitive vs. present participle (time relations)

I was told that one of the following refers to the past and the other to the future. I cannot decide which is which and would appreciate it if someone could explain the difference between these ...
0
votes
3answers
185 views

“Attempts to acquaint” vs. “attempts at acquainting”

The research study is an eye-opener and attempts to acquaint/attempts at acquainting us with the problems of poor nations. For me, attempts to acquaint sounds more apt. But I am not sure ...
-1
votes
2answers
656 views

“Feel committed to [gerund/infinitive]”

Does "feel committed to" require an infinitive or gerund complement? For example, which of the following is grammatical? I feel committed to following up on that. I feel committed to follow ...
1
vote
1answer
537 views

“Heard me [infinitive]” vs. “heard me [gerund]”

"Heard me [infinitive]" vs. "heard me [gerund]" At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talk about it. At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talking about it. At that time, ...
2
votes
1answer
229 views

Correct usage of infinitives

I am not sure about the usage of infinitives in this sentence: Finally, one of the accused confessed to have forged the director's signature on the report. Could anyone explain correct usage? ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

in order to [gerund] or [infinitive]?

There are few questions and answer on the choice of gerund versus infinitive. From what I understand, when conveying a purpose the infinitive should be used: I use my key in order to open the ...
1
vote
2answers
703 views

Infinitive or Gerund for celebration of an event?

Which of the following sentences would be correct in a baby shower invitation. My grandparents are looking forward to celebrate my arrival in February. My grandparents are looking forward to ...
4
votes
1answer
596 views

The choice between the gerund and the infinitive in a certain construction

I am pretty much sure that for native speakers the issue I am going to bring up might look as an uncalled question as they can easily figure out which form of a verbal part of speech should be used, ...
7
votes
3answers
993 views

Help identifying an error type “tried to help me learning”

I have a friend from Russia who is trying to learn English and recently used the sentence "He tried to help me learning..." (implied: the English language) It is obviously wrong and I corrected it ...
-1
votes
1answer
9k views

“Prefer to do something” vs. “prefer doing something” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should a verb be followed by a gerund instead of an infinitive? What's the difference between the two: What materials do they prefer working with? What ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“Ambitious to [infinitive]” vs. “ambitious about [gerund]”

What is the correct preposition to use with ambitious? I am ambitious to achieve success. I am ambitious about achieving success.
3
votes
3answers
974 views

Which of these sentences is correctly written?

Someone edited my message on StackOverflow, but it really bugs me out. I'm not sure what's wrong with it: As you see, the bigger the circle becomes, the more vertices I need for hiding the straight ...
6
votes
2answers
372 views

“It is fun to write letters” vs. “It is fun writing letters”

Grammatically, "It is fun to write English letters." is correct. But is the following also grammatically correct? It is fun writing English letters.
0
votes
2answers
115 views

“To know X is all I need” vs. “knowing X is all I need” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does one know when to use a gerund or a infinitive? Which of the following is the correct form? To know you're interested in my book is all I need to go on ...
2
votes
2answers
7k views

Expect +to VS expect + ing

I know that expect is used this way: I expect you to do that. But I have also seen examples like with verb in its "ing" form: > What to expect working at... > I will expect you doing ...
6
votes
1answer
6k views

“Stop working” vs “stopped to work”

I want to know, is there any difference between "stop + v.(ing)" and "stopped to + v.". These are example sentences. I stop working for a month. vs I stopped to work for a month. I stop watching ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Grammatical complements for “allow”

Are any of these verb phrases grammatical? allows the user of modeling and resolving allows the user to model and resolve Which version of the following sentence is correct/better? ...
3
votes
4answers
28k views

“Started to work” vs “Started working”

What is the difference between the following: Things started to work again. Things started working again.
5
votes
1answer
359 views

Why was _to_ verb_+ing_ used in this case? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to use “to + V-ing”? “To hear” or “to hearing”? Samson had been a strong man prior to having his hair cut. From a grammatical point of view, when ...
3
votes
2answers
311 views

“To handle certificates is…” vs. “handling certificates is…”

I have two equivalent sentences, intended for a brochure for a computer program. Which one is better? To handle certificates manually is time consuming and expensive. Handling certificates ...
-2
votes
3answers
268 views

“The aims are promoting and protecting” vs. “the aims are to promote and protect”

Which of the following two constructions is correct? and why? Some of the important aims of the UNO are to promote peace and protect human rights. Some of the important aims of the UNO are ...
11
votes
2answers
37k views

How to use “to + V-ing”?

I saw some scenarios that used the structure "to + V-ing", such as the following: Looking forward to hearing. Disposed to using few words. I would like to apply what I learned in school to helping ...