3
votes
2answers
105 views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
-1
votes
2answers
85 views

“My” twice in a sentence

To settle a disagreement, is the following sentence grammatically correct? It's slowing my paying my debts off.
1
vote
2answers
116 views

Is “Studying will help me with achieving my dreams” grammatical?

I need to take sentences out of a transcript, so I can’t change the structure of this particular sentence. I can either use it in my work as a grammatically correct sentence, or I can't. I just ...
0
votes
2answers
115 views

To see them play and to see them playing

Excuse my limited acquaintance on English usage; which sentence is grammatically correct, and if any, which meaning do they convey to ? I saw them play chess. I saw then playing chess. Many ...
1
vote
3answers
161 views

Can the word 'formatting' be used as a noun?

Can the word formatting be used as a noun like in the following sentence: Consider the formatting of this JavaScript code... Or is it a gerund which should be used without an article: Consider ...
0
votes
3answers
404 views

Can “once” and “since” be followed by a V-ing clause?

Consider these examples: Since the board realized that the figures are increasing, they have been searching for a new campaign. Once the board realized that the figures are increasing, they ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

“Suggest to go” vs. “suggest going”

I took an English assessment test online and this was my answer: Someone suggested to go for a walk. My answer was wrong and this was the correct sentence: Someone suggested going for a ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“Having not” vs “not having”

I did a bit of searching on the difference between "not having" and "having not", but I could not find a convincing argument. I typed this sentence; Congratulations on not having given up yet! ...
2
votes
1answer
911 views

“To see” vs “seeing” [duplicate]

Which of the following is grammatical? To see my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! Seeing my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! The verb "to see" is ...
1
vote
1answer
246 views

“Committed to build” vs. “committed to building”

If this were a mere tagline, not a complete sentence in a full paragraph, which would be more correct? Committed to build a better world Committed to building a better world
3
votes
5answers
2k views

What's the difference between an -ing noun and a real noun

Some verbs have corresponding nouns. Also, an '-ing' can be added to create a new noun. For example: Develop is a verb. Development is a noun. Developing is also a noun. So are the sentences ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Singular vs. Plural with Multiple Gerunds as Subject (IE: [Gerund] and [Gerund] are/is [something].)

I'm trying to find out whether I should use a singular or plural verb when there are multiple gerunds as the subject of the sentence. For example: Running the correct course and keeping a steady ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

“A tool to do” vs. “a tool that does” vs. “a tool for doing”

I'm the curator of the Open Web Platform Daily Digest link. In the "Tools" section of each daily I write entries in this format: tool_name, tool_description For example: hapi, a server framework ...
0
votes
2answers
380 views

“Committed to supporting X” vs. “committed to support X” [duplicate]

I'm trying to edit a speech and found a commonly used phase which I'm not sure if I should amend it or not. The sentence goes like this: [a subject] is committed to supporting [a project]. ...
3
votes
1answer
220 views

Gerund preceded by a genitive?

Is this sentence actually grammatical? You know your having a rough day when kittens don't even make you smile. The writer of this sentence may intend to mean you're instead of your but I'm just ...
3
votes
3answers
276 views

Is “to practice volleyball requires stamina” grammatical?

Is the sentence "to practice volleyball requires stamina" grammatically correct? As opposed to the sentence "practicing volleyball requires stamina"? Another example: To ensure safety ...
2
votes
1answer
315 views

Use of gerund without preposition “to”

Can I use gerunds with the word "concede" without using preposition "to" as in the sentence below? He concedes killing his wife.
-1
votes
2answers
819 views

“Feel committed to [gerund/infinitive]”

Does "feel committed to" require an infinitive or gerund complement? For example, which of the following is grammatical? I feel committed to following up on that. I feel committed to follow ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

The correct use of “sundering”

I'm writing a book in which one of the major events is a day that separates two major forces in the world. It's meant to be a punishment from a high power, so at first I wanted to call it The Day of ...
1
vote
1answer
756 views

Is it necessary to use “the” before using verb+“ing” in specific contexts?

I am confused with whether it is necessary to use the before verbs in certain contexts. Like: The milking of a cow is not a painful process at all like you think. I am afraid it has never been ...
2
votes
2answers
126 views

“Drag & dropping” or “Dragging & dropping”

"Drag & dropping" sounds better to me, but "Dragging & dropping" has more Google results... Which one is correct and why?
0
votes
5answers
78 views

Is using “get on developing” correct in this phrase?

You could get on developing this project and help me to add more features to that.
1
vote
2answers
201 views

“He remembered seeing a pocket compass […] and marveling/marveled”

Albert Einstein talked about what influenced his life as a scientist. He remembered seeing a pocket compass when he was five years old and (marveling/marveled) that the needle always pointed ...
-1
votes
1answer
995 views

Past Perfect and gerund vs. Past Perfect and Simple Past [closed]

When using the past perfect tense to say something happened before something else, is it correct to use the gerund form (as opposed to the past tense) to express the latter event? For example, is it ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“Ambitious to [infinitive]” vs. “ambitious about [gerund]”

What is the correct preposition to use with ambitious? I am ambitious to achieve success. I am ambitious about achieving success.
4
votes
1answer
175 views

Are all of these sentences grammatical?

He was charged with killing 13 people. He was charged with having killed 13 people. He was charged with the crime he killed 13 people. I suppose the phrase no. 1 is correct but the ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Which of these sentences is correctly written?

Someone edited my message on StackOverflow, but it really bugs me out. I'm not sure what's wrong with it: As you see, the bigger the circle becomes, the more vertices I need for hiding the straight ...
10
votes
1answer
445 views

“Road liable to flooding” — is this roadsign grammatically correct?

I passed the roadsign below while driving home late last night, and realised that despite how many times I had seen it, I was still surprised by the choice of words used and unsure if it was actually ...
1
vote
3answers
382 views

“A smile cures the wounding of a frown”

I found the following on a poster of a professional photographer: A smile cures the wounding of a frown The sentence seems awkward and wrong to me. I think something can cure a disease and heal ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Correct use of “wanting” [closed]

To begin with a clarification: I'm not speaking of "wanting" as in "lacking" (e.g. a box wanting its lid.) Rather, it's about uses like this one: Person A: I want to go with you. Person B: ...
6
votes
2answers
399 views

“It is fun to write letters” vs. “It is fun writing letters”

Grammatically, "It is fun to write English letters." is correct. But is the following also grammatically correct? It is fun writing English letters.
-2
votes
2answers
308 views

“After downloaded” vs. “After downloading” [closed]

What is the difference between "After downloaded" and "After downloading"? Are they both grammatical? After downloaded, I start running this program. After downloading, I start running this ...
6
votes
5answers
17k views

Is “solutioning” a correct word?

My Outlook flags the word "solutioning" as a spelling mistake. According to Urban Dictionary : solutioning: A word many business people misuse to describe the process of creating a solution. ...
0
votes
2answers
115 views

“To know X is all I need” vs. “knowing X is all I need” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does one know when to use a gerund or a infinitive? Which of the following is the correct form? To know you're interested in my book is all I need to go on ...
1
vote
2answers
116 views

“by winning” vs “by her winning” or “of her win”

I have a dilema, here's a little excerpt: Anna, an accomplished classical musician, was encouraged by her winning the prestigious award .... plans to launch a new album. Sounds really wrong. ...
-3
votes
1answer
2k views

Is this use of “having” correct? [closed]

Please consider this sentence in which I am using having: Having full driving licence, life insurance, 5 year driving experience and never have an accident, I am great driver. Is this use of ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Grammatical complements for “allow”

Are any of these verb phrases grammatical? allows the user of modeling and resolving allows the user to model and resolve Which version of the following sentence is correct/better? ...
5
votes
1answer
388 views

Why was _to_ verb_+ing_ used in this case? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to use “to + V-ing”? “To hear” or “to hearing”? Samson had been a strong man prior to having his hair cut. From a grammatical point of view, when ...
-2
votes
3answers
281 views

“The aims are promoting and protecting” vs. “the aims are to promote and protect”

Which of the following two constructions is correct? and why? Some of the important aims of the UNO are to promote peace and protect human rights. Some of the important aims of the UNO are ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “Forgive my being late” grammatical?

Is it grammatically correct to write "forgive my being late to this discussion" as an alternative to "sorry that I'm late to this discussion"?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Using the gerund two times in a row

When you have this construct: . . . is a key factor in the making and controlling of the water. Should you leave only the last verb in the gerund: . . . is a key factor in the make and ...
5
votes
4answers
782 views

Usage of the gerund preceded by the possessive pronoun

I read this thread on the usage of the gerund preceded by the possessive pronoun with much interest. I have another question about the usage of the gerund preceded by the possessive pronoun. In a ...
21
votes
3answers
6k views

When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun?

I assume that the following sentences are grammatically correct: He resents your being more popular than he is. Most of the members paid their dues without my asking them. They objected ...