A noun formed from a verb by the addition of -ing.

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2
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2answers
43 views

Infinitive or gerund [duplicate]

So, I've got this phrase: ''Far from fleeing monotony, animals crave it, and what they most dread is to see it end.'' Can someone explain me why it is written ''to see it end'' rather than ''to see ...
0
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1answer
23 views

What to use?: Infinitive, bare infinitive or gerund as a complement after an expression [duplicate]

I came across some sentences and I was wondering which word is correct: 'train,' 'to train' or 'training'? What we should do is train our workers to become more efficient. All I we do is train our ...
0
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3answers
33 views

Difference between “detection method” vs “detecting method”

I'm not a native speaker of English. So, I don't know English Grammar well. What's difference between "detection method" vs "detecting method"? Which one is correct? Is it related to I'm writing ...
1
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1answer
63 views

It is about Gerunds and present participle [duplicate]

Please clarify if what I have mentioned below is correct. I like painting. - Gerund? I like painting pictures. - Present participle?
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2answers
75 views

Do these two sentences use the possessive case of gerunds properly?

Gerunds have proven to be adequate forms of "annoyances" to me and have thus led me to inquire their properties and uses. I would appreciate it if anyone could provide me with assistance in this ...
4
votes
2answers
113 views

When / While + gerund

I would like to ask about two things Can both "while" and "when" be used with a gerund? Which one sounds better: "While ordering" or "when ordering" ? While ordering a taxi, reliability is very ...
2
votes
1answer
175 views

The “to~” infinitive always implies the future, except for preference Like and Love

A fellow teacher said to me that the to~ infinitive always implies the future..."to eat", "to swim" etc. I disagreed and said that I thought it was abstract and had no tense in of itself. He pointed ...
1
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0answers
22 views

Using to + gerund and to + invinitive [duplicate]

"I go to school" Because 'to' is a preposition then is it correct to write "I go to watching the movie"? If not, please explain why. Thank you.
1
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1answer
43 views

Question about the details in meaning between gerund and to-infinite

Consider the following multiple-choice question: The supervisors were asked ______ tasks to new employees so that they could be trained to do them properly. A. Delegate - infinitive B. To ...
0
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1answer
22 views

Is the usage “… is/are hurting” from a victim's perspective grammatically correct?

I recall listening to a statement by Obama one or two years ago (also after a shooting incident, most likely) where he remarked something like "... our people are hurting". Since he was referring to ...
1
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2answers
165 views

When must a gerund be preceded by a possessive pronoun as opposed to an accusative one?

I was recently reading this very interesting post here: When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun? In this thread, it is argued persuasively that we could use either his or ...
-4
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1answer
67 views

“talk” vs. “talking” – which sentence is correct? [closed]

1) He used to stop talking so that he could drink his beer, and then he continued his talking. 2) He used to stop talking so that he could drink his beer, and then he continued his talk. Can you ...
0
votes
1answer
120 views

Gerund usage: when can verbs be used as -ing nouns? [duplicate]

I have a question regarding the correct usage of verbs as nouns ending in -ing (I understand that these are referred to as gerunds). Under what circumstance may a gerund be used in place of the verb ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Understanding X/Understanding *of* X: What's the distinction?

Say we have two sentences that use understanding as a gerund: Understanding how to open this door is crucial in the event of an emergency. My understanding of physics is woefully inadequate. ...
0
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1answer
83 views

Object pronouns+verbs+ing

As non native speaker of English , I'm having trouble making sense of a structure pertaining to object pronouns. Likelihood of me doing this.... Your plan involves me attempting to prepare ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

Gerund Separate Words

My friend and I have been debating if adding 'ing' to a word makes it its own word. We said Webster would be the final answer for the debate. A search on Webster though brought back the root word as ...
1
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2answers
42 views

“predicting” or “prediction of”?

What is the difference between "can be used for prediction of user behaviour" and "can be used for predicting user behaviour"? I like the second version more since it's shorter and without a ...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

Possessive followed by negative gerund

Is it correct to say this? Her not paying attention to the class annoys me.
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2answers
74 views

Is there a form and/or synonym of the gerund “spelling” that can be put into an adverb position such as that of “grammatically”?

That is, how would I go about converting the word "spelling" (as in the spelling of a word) to an adverb that actually sounds right in the blank of "_____-inept"? I'm pretty sure "spellingly" isn't a ...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

In what (semantic) context might “REFUSE” be used with a gerund complement?

I know that, prescriptively speaking, that the verb "refuse" is supposed to be followed by an infinitive. For example: The parents refused to buy the dangerous toy for their kid. Since language ...
1
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1answer
95 views

“Informing” — Gerund instead of Verb+Object?

I think if we take informing as a noun in this sentence, it should be fine. What are your views on the grammaticality of the following sentence? He left me without informing.
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2answers
54 views

devote herself to caring for poor people vs. devote herself to care for poor people [duplicate]

I came across the following multiple-choice question: She devoted herself to ( ) for poor people. The choices are: caring care be caring have cared As the preposition "to" can be ...
1
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2answers
303 views

Problem with gerunds

I'm a non-native English speaker and have recently come across a phrase, also written by a non-native English speaker, that puzzled me: Automatic creating tasks (this is the name of a software ...
0
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1answer
75 views

What is the word for a past-tense verb used like a gerund?

In a comment on this answer to a similar question, the user Kris identifies the concept of "a member of a class to which gerunds belong but itself [is] not a gerund." Is there a word for such a thing? ...
1
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4answers
157 views

“spent a lot of time to shop” vs. “spent a lot of time shopping”

She spends a lot of time to shop. She spends a lot of time shopping. Are both of these sentences grammatically correct and do they have the same meaning?
1
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1answer
117 views

“spent a lot of money to buy a house” vs. “spent a lot of money buying a house”

He spent a lot of money to buy a house. He spent a lot of money buying a house. In my head both of the sentences are correct. What's the difference between these sentences?
1
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1answer
103 views

Simple or perfect form of gerund [closed]

I just wondering if the meaning of the following sentences are equivalent? I know the difference between past and perfect tenses. So I'm just trying to ask if I can use first sentence instead of the ...
0
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0answers
47 views

Gerunds - Should they be a word class of their own? [duplicate]

I'm a bit astonished about the long discussions in the post How can I prove a word is a noun? I admit that there a certain problems, especially with gerunds. Smoking cigarettes is unhealty. In ...
0
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0answers
64 views

Why is gerund not used in this sentence?

I read a sentence in Fox news: "If they are able to exploit it, that is say break it open and potentially analyze it and categorize it this will give them a great deal of information about how ...
2
votes
2answers
93 views

What's the plural of “picking up”?

I'm writing in the context of ice skating. This is the sentence I wish to construct: There will be many falls, but serious injuries are rare, and picking ups are easy. "picking up" is the ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Temporal Clause for Past Participle

I was wondering if there is a difference between reduced temporal clause with gerund and reduced temporal clause with past participle, and which one is used in formal setting? For example: Sentence ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

Subject of gerund phrase [duplicate]

Me getting a hangover is nothing like her getting a hangover. - I'd rather contemplate you singing than him singing. Is this grammatically correct?
0
votes
1answer
100 views

Gerund vs infinitive paraphrase

Is there any difference between these two sentences: "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, discouraging rich people from voting for them" "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, which discourages ...
4
votes
1answer
166 views

Is there a better term for “perfect infinitive”, “perfect participle” or “perfect gerund”?

BACKGROUND There are grammar terms such as 'present perfect' and 'past perfect' as in: She has learned English for 10 years. [present perfect] She had learned English when she was little. ...
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0answers
91 views

Gerund form of the verb after “I should've lied instead of” [closed]

So would I say "I should've lied instead of telling the truth?"
0
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1answer
219 views

What is difference between “using” and “by using”?

Sometimes both "using" and "by using" seem to have the same meaning. Am I wrong? For example, compare the sentences below: "On-screen keyboards allow people with mobility impairments to type data ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

How to use a gerund with 'my' in a sentence? [duplicate]

I am trying to say, "this led to my working as a research assistant with ...". I think something's awry in this phrase. Am I right?
0
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0answers
35 views

possessive-before-gerund: “him sleeping with” or “his sleeping with”? [duplicate]

Did gypsies cut off man's penis in revenge for him sleeping with one of their girlfriends? Shouldn't that be his sleeping? Is the possessive-before-gerund rule still a rule on both sides of the ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

What is a gerund? A noun or a verb? 'His smoking upset me’

I've been studying the Huddleston and Pullum book for four months now. So far only one thing confuses me: the identity of gerund. Is it a noun or a verb? His constant smoking upset me. smoking ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Is this a correct usage of a gerund?

I have already used structures such as "I don't like him singing the song" or "I don't like his singing the song". It dates back to years age when I learned it. So I wonder if I can use the following ...
0
votes
1answer
283 views

Clauses of purpose: “for + -ing” or "to-infinitive [duplicate]

In the following sentence, how should the clause of purpose be introduced? In addition to normal maintenance, there are additional costs associated with interventions that may be required to ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Beginning a sentence with a gerund?

My teacher recently marked on my paper not to use a gerund to start a sentence. I have been told by teachers in the past to use that format to vary sentence structure. It seems to make the paper flow ...
1
vote
2answers
147 views

Dedicated to producing vs dedicated to the production - use of gerund in place of noun

- A factory famous for the production of. . . - A factory famous for producing . . . - A farm dedicated to the cultivation of . . . - A farm dedicated to cultivating . . . - The firm focused on the ...
3
votes
2answers
177 views

Using 'better' as an adverb before a gerund

I recently used the following headline in a document: Better Managing Your Health Means Better Managing Your Life My boss wrote back that "better managing" is not grammatically correct. She's wrong, ...
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votes
2answers
284 views

Why must the infinitive be used after “I am qualified to”?

I am not able to understand why the infinitive must be used after "I am qualified to". For example I am qualified to teach. Does not to play the role of preposition in this sentence? If the ...
-1
votes
2answers
346 views

going + ing vs going + infinitive, when use which?

In the middle of a conversation I should use which of the follow sentences: Tomorrow, I'm going climbing. or Tomorrow, I'm going to climb. I did a deep search and I found these similar ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

“Jesus is a coming” - what's the exact grammatical role of the “a” before the gerund? [duplicate]

I've noticed that in the common use of English, namely in songs, there is also an extra redundant(?) "a" before a gerund, such as in a gospel song I heard Jesus is a coming (this particular ...
0
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2answers
331 views

Gerund: Difference between “knowledge” and “knowing” [closed]

In these days I find out something about The Gerunds and now i want to know what's The difference between these nouns “knowledge” and “knowing”? And which one on is Gerund? Clearing: in my language ...
2
votes
4answers
849 views

Can I use the word “promise” with gerund?

Is it possible to use gerund after the verb "promise"? For example, in the sentence "He promised cleaning the window. I'd prefer to say: He promised to clean the window. But today I was told that this ...
0
votes
4answers
114 views

“In” + gerund: “Pip joins the procession in carrying the casket”

Pip joins the funeral procession, planned out by Mr. Trabb, the tailor, in carrying Mrs. Joe’s casket through town. Is this sentence grammatically correct? One of my teachers proofread my work, ...