Questions related to geography.

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Do I so often encounter simple past for past participle (e.g., “I have went,” “what was did to her”) because of where I am or when?

Since moving to small-town northern Minnesota (USA) two dozen years back to teach English, I have noticed a lot of instances in spoken language where the simple past is used in lieu of the past ...
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2answers
57 views

How to phrase a worldwide location in English?

I have an online form where a user would usually submit a specific location in a field, e.g. Moscow, Berlin, New York, Paris. But sometimes there is no specific city location, for instance for a ...
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1answer
588 views

How should I parse the name of the UK? [closed]

I've grown up in the UK and always considered that it is a United Kingdom of four countries: the three countries on the island of Great Britain and the country/province1 of Northern Ireland. ...
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2answers
115 views

Why do we say County Durham?

In Ireland all the counties are expressed as 'County....' followed by the name, e.g. County Kerry, County Galway, County Clare etc. This equally applies to the six counties north of the border, County ...
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2answers
26 views

Capitalize “state?” [duplicate]

Do you capitalize the word "state" when saying, "In Washington State, individuals who are unemployed may apply for treatment through DSHS."
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2answers
366 views

Where in the world does “a lift” mean “a ride in the car”?

In the United States and Canada, when someone asks you for "a lift" or you offer "a lift", you are speaking about riding in a car with them. However, in England and other places, a "lift" is an ...
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1answer
109 views

Do Australians say “down north”?

I noticed some maps from the southern hemisphere are "reversed" with the south pole on top. Which makes me wonder, are there places in the southern hemisphere where the concept of "down" is presumed ...
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2answers
83 views

How do I refer to a geographical area outside Britain (use article or not)

I am not a native English speaker. In a scientific paper I'm writing, I refer to geographical areas in Belgium: Kempen, Hageland. In Dutch, an article is used when referring to these areas: "in de ...
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2answers
2k views

Meaning of suffix '-sex' in 'Sussex, Middlesex' [closed]

I know that Sussex and Middlesex are in England. It looks to me as if there is a pattern in names. What does the suffix -sex mean? Where does it come from?
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1answer
131 views

Adjective relating to Great Britain and Ireland

Is there an adjective meaning “from or pertaining to the British Isles” (or if you prefer “from Great Britain, Ireland or surrounding islands”, or “from the Atlantic Archipelago”, or whatever floats ...
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0answers
460 views

Where can I find a list of colloquial abbreviations for cities? [closed]

I'm seeking a list of commonly used abbreviations for US cities (and also European cities, but let's start with the US). When I say abbreviations, that could be anything from 2 letters or more that ...
2
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1answer
562 views

What are the associations of the word “Heights” in a city name? [closed]

There are lots of cities and other designations with the word "Heights" in the name. Does this refer to something specific? Is it a marketing tactic perhaps? Examples: Hacienda Heights Sterling ...
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4answers
425 views

Up my street and down the lane [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do I travel “up” or “down” to London from north of the city? Except where there is obvious difference in elevation e.g. on a sloping road, how do ...
3
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1answer
162 views

The Black Country in UK

I have encountered the name The Black Country in old books. From Wikipedia: The Black Country is a loosely defined area of the English West Midlands conurbation, to the north and west of ...
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3answers
185 views

What terms describe who pays for a meal? [closed]

I have heard the terms go dutch and AA used to mean that, when two or more people eat at a restaurant, each will pay only the price of their own dish. Also treat is used to describe the act of one ...
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5answers
856 views

Is the term “village” used in North America?

The post Difference between "town", "city" and "metropolis"? describes the usage of terms describing various sizes of cities. In the US, I have never encountered any ...
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3answers
1k views

When to put “River” before or after its name and why?

Unlike mountain names, where "Mount" always precedes its name, e.g. Mount Everest, I've noticed that some rivers have "River" before its name, e.g. the River Nile but others have it after, e.g. the ...
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14answers
3k views

Generic name for places like village, town and cities

There is the German word Ort or Ortschaft which is a hypernym for places where people live like villages towns cities etc. Is there a correspondent word in English? I don't want to use location ...
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3answers
2k views

What is a good word to describe a large geographical area [closed]

What is a good word (or a phrase) to describe a large, extensive geographical area, spanning several regions? I am not looking to use this in a particular context, but to help in conceptualizing a ...
3
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1answer
581 views

Is Jutland so-called because the region it describes 'juts out' into the ocean?

I know that 'Jutland', a part of Denmark, comes from the Danish 'Jylland', which describes the same region. But was that name just invented at random, or does it come from the verb 'jut', as the land ...
2
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1answer
6k views

South vs Southern - difference? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is the use of “north” more appropriate than “northern” and vice versa? Are there any differences in meanings of South vs Southern, North vs ...
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7answers
550 views

Can I use the term 'America' to signify just the United States?

I write legal marketing materials. Does the term 'America' signify Canada + USA + Mexico, etc. to readers abroad or will they know that I'm talking specifically about the USA?
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4answers
6k views

What is the history and geographic area of the word “finna?”

In St. Louis, I learned of the word, "finna." I know it is slang/contraction for "fixing to." By asking dozens of people, I've learned that it is used by people of many different races and cultural ...
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3answers
751 views

Why are country names localized and city names not?

As discussed here, names for the same city in different languages tend to be just variant pronunciations. By contrast, a country that is known by (even roughly) the same name in most languages is the ...
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5answers
8k views

What is a suitable word to describe a place where two rivers meet?

I've googled for a while and on some sites I've found the word "watershed" as the proposed word. Is it the word that best suits it?
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10answers
1k views

Why does English have city/country names that differ from the local language?

For example: Italy = Italia Florence = Firenze Rome = Roma Venice = Venezia Munich = München Different reasons for different cities? Anglicised for pronunciation? The name changed and English ...
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6answers
3k views

Is “the USA” singular or plural?

On the one side, the USA is just one country. Logic says it should be, then, singular, just like the United Kingdom is. Example: The USA owns this domain. On the other side, if I however expand ...
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1answer
193 views

Any term pertaining to geography, but not to toponymy?

Can you, please, come up with some term that would be directly related to geography, but would have no relation to toponymy?
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2answers
406 views

How to refer to “mainland Europe”

As a Europhile living in England, it really bothers me when journalists refer to mainland Europe as "Europe". We're in Europe! But I appreciate that it offers a neat shorthand for referring to the ...