In grammar, a future tense is a verb form that marks the event described by the verb as not having happened yet.

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“It is to be discussed”, what is the infinitive doing in this sentence?

It is to be discussed. Is be + infinitive forming the future tense here? You are to be dressed and ready by 8:00. I was thinking it's almost commanding (or speaking of a command) but this ...
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1answer
511 views

Are “I will have been going” and “I would have been going” rarely used today?

As far as I know these are tenses that you do not often use. Am I right? Will have been + verb+ing Would have been + verb+ing
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1answer
78 views

could and might to talk about future possibility

I have problem with using could in the future possibilities for example: They have the technology, but unless the government makes stricter laws, car companies ____ do it. With which one should I ...
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2answers
77 views

Will marry vs will get married [duplicate]

I have seen both sentences below: I will get married. I will marry. So what is the difference? Which one is recommended? Is there any difference in meaning or just grammar?
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2answers
1k views

Using “will” after “if”

I've been told that native-speakers don't ever use "will" after "if", and that saying it this way is a not-native style. So from the film (Harry Potter, pt5) I noticed a line that confused me. Look ...
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1answer
57 views

Future tense and future perfect tense [closed]

Given two sentences: If we goad him into doing what he should have been doing all along, then it will be a smashing success. and If we goad him into doing what he should have been doing all ...
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5answers
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Future tense in conditional clauses

All the textbooks I have ever come across during the course of my studying English emphasize that future tense should not be used in conditional clauses. For example, If it rains in the evening, ...
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1answer
65 views

Shall, third person singular, archaic form

The second person of will and shall are wilt and shalt in the archaic form. The third person singular suffix is -eth, so we get willeth but what about shall? Thank you for your answers!
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2answers
4k views

Can we use should /would and /could in Future perfect tense

I would have finished my home work by evening . He should have been more careful. Can these be used as future perfect tense ?
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2answers
77 views

Do I say “I am going” or “I will be going”? [duplicate]

Which sounds more correct? I am going to the post office in 2 hours I will be going to the post office in 2 hours Is there any difference between the two sentences?
0
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1answer
168 views

Difference between: “would be”, “will be”, and “is/are -ing”

Which one is correct? Heard you would be going. Heard you will be going. Heard you are going. What differences are there?
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1answer
86 views

shall+be+ ing Verb structure [duplicate]

Why does one use shall+be+ing instead of will? What are the functions of be and V+ing? I shall be focusing on the mechanisms that govern individual`s choices at and beyond school-leaving age and ...
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7answers
2k views

Is the use of future tense (especially “will” and “shall”) going out of grammar?

My English teacher taught us that there is no such thing called "future tense" in existence. Instead we were asked to use present indefinite tense. He said that we should use "I am to go to London" ...
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1answer
73 views

“Obama is in town this weekend” or “Obama will be in town this weekend” [duplicate]

A friend of mine used the following phrase to tell me about Obama's visit to Malaysia this weekend (he told me this when it was not already the weekend): Obama is in town this weekend. This ...
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3answers
1k views

When did periphrastic tenses stop being tenses?

English sometimes has several different ways of expressing the same thing. For example, it can form a possessive either by using an old case inflection: The dog’s tail was always wagging. Or it ...
0
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2answers
312 views

It will be done at that point in the future vs It will have been done at that point

I am struggling with understanding the difference here: It will be done at that point in the future. It will have been done at point in the future. I know in theory what future perfect tense means ...
36
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10answers
10k views

When should I use “shall” versus “will”?

Which is the correct use of these two words, and in which context should one be used rather than the other?
3
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2answers
62 views

stop vs stopped?

what is the difference between; "what if we stop X" and "what if we stopped X" We are trying to write an inspirational statement, not so much a question, to provoke thought around stopping X. For ...
3
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5answers
17k views

“Will graduate” vs. “will be graduated” vs. “is going to graduate”

Which of the following sentences are correct? He will graduate in May. He will be graduated in May. He is going to graduate in May. Issue 1: Is the second one grammatical? Issue 2: ...
2
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3answers
116 views

“Boys will be boys!” Is 'will be' a future simple of 'be' or a present simple of modal auxiliary 'will'?

In the proverb: Boys will be boys! is 'will be' one verb or two? the future simple of 'be' (one verb)? or the present simple of modal auxiliary 'will' + the bare present infinitive of 'be' ...
3
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2answers
121 views

The word for “too far into the future to predict”, often about the state of technology

What is the word for when you can't predict the future because of the rapidly changing landscape. For example, the state of technology in the future. Due to the boost in devices in the last few ...
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6answers
1k views

Past present future all in one word?

Does the English language have a mechanism for expressing past, present and future tense simultaneously? In other words, consider the following three sentences: 1) The force was with me. 2) The ...
2
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1answer
178 views

Future tense in both main clause and subordinate clause

I have encountered in some grammar books that you can never have the future tense in the sub-ordinate clause when the main clause is also in the future tense. It seems to hold in conditional clauses ...
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0answers
44 views

using “in the future” at the end of a question [closed]

Just wondering if it is necessary to use in the future at the end of certain sentences. E.g. "are you expecting him to come and work for you in the future?" I know most people tend to put this at the ...
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1answer
264 views

Present tense vs. future tense following a conditional

If you ask without any background, many people are likely to assume you are just too lazy to do the work yourself. If you ask without any background, many people will likely assume you are ...
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1answer
140 views

Why the Simple-Present “closes” in “thousands will see the exhibit by the time it closes”?

Consider the sentence: Thousands of people will see the art exhibit by the time it closes. The first part of this sentence is in Future Simple, which seems correct as it is something to be ...
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4answers
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“Going to go” vs “going to”

1) I am going to go watch a game. 2) I am going to a game. 3) I am going to golf. 4) I am going to go golfing. What are the differences and similarities between and among sentences ...
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2answers
124 views

Are owe and due are the opposites?

"You are due an apology" If I say that to someone then it means that I owe them an apology and not the other way around. I recently debated this with someone and they could not make sense of it and ...
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2answers
1k views

Is this correct: “Water will be being drunk by Michael”?

I started with "Michael is drinking water", which I could convert to "Water is being drunk by Michael", which I could change to the past tense as "Water was being drunk by Michael". That leads me to ...
4
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4answers
662 views

Can the Future Perfect be used in a main clause of a conditional sentence that has a stative/non-action verb in the if-clause?

A student asked me this question today about a sentence like: (1) If Canada's population is 40 million, the Canadian economy will have been more dynamic. I was asked if it corresponded, in a future ...
4
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2answers
468 views

Conditionals in the future

My colleague and I have a hot discussion about which is correct. My version is: If you don't fix the bug I will send you a patch. and his one is: I would send you a patch if you don't fix ...
6
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3answers
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When should I use “Would”, “Would have”, “Will”, and “Will have”?

I hope someone, once and for all, can clarify (with examples) the difference in usage of will vs. would vs. would have vs. will have.
3
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1answer
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Is phrase “will you be needing …” correct?

I'm curious about this phrase Will you be needing [...] ? It seems gramatically correct; I am also fine with "need" used in continuous time. But I'm wondering if it is used in spoken ...
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1answer
257 views

Usage of 'would' in the future tense?

Is there anything wrong in this sentence? "I would go to work tomorrow if the buses were plying." I know it is not wrong to use 'would' in hypothetical sentences in the past and present tense: ...
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1answer
219 views

“She sees in the mirror” vs. “she will see in the mirror?” [closed]

Is this sentence correct? She will grow up hating what she sees in the mirror. Or should it be: She will grow up hating what she will see in the mirror. I think first one is correct, I ...
0
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1answer
177 views

Future perfect or simple in this context

In a movie I saw, a young boy told to an old man that he would be gone for a long time when something happens. I'm trying to figure out what the boy actually said and what tense should have been used ...
0
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1answer
46 views

future clause confusion

Can I say: I will let you know what I manage to do To express that after I manage to do something (in the future) I will write/talk with the recipient.
3
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2answers
198 views

Is ”If I leave, it’s because Bob has arrived” ambiguous?

If I leave, it’s because Bob has arrived. Does this mean: Bob has not arrived yet. When Bob does arrive (shortly), I may leave. Bob is here now and requesting my attention. Therefore, I may ...
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4answers
1k views

“going to” vs “will”

I know several questions were asked about the difference between "going to" and "will". Based on several answers (see, for instance, here, here and here), I understood that "will" is more spontaneous ...
5
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3answers
9k views

“Going to go” vs “going to”?

My significant other tells me that I'm not "going to go" to the shops, I'm "going to" the shops, and beats me mercilessly when I say that. Is this not correct? I might not be going to the shops until ...
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1answer
400 views

May I have some examples of “future perfect continuous” from fiction or literature, with references? [closed]

Question says it all and again it should be from literature or fiction. I was told that the future perfect continuous does not exist. So I am looking for examples from “real published and acclaimed ...
3
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1answer
161 views

Usage of future perfect

I have a question about the usage of the future perfect thingy: I know that it is used to talk about a completed action before a time in future, but is it wrong to use just plain future simple in this ...
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1answer
274 views

Is this sentence in the Future Continuous?

Would be obliged if someone could clarify whether the following is in the Future Continuous tense. The Earth will be three degrees hotter by the year 2050. It seems so but I need to be ...
0
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1answer
94 views

Won't followed by noun

I try to understand the song 'Sober' by band Tool. And there are couple of sentence with won't followed by pronoun or noun and without verb. For example: 'Jesus, won't you f*cking whistle nothing ...
2
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2answers
735 views

Simple Present for Future Actions

Why can we use the following statement when we mean future events? What time do you get there? Or should we rather say: What time will you get there? Is there a difference?
2
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2answers
2k views

will be possible to be used

Is it (1) correct, (2) natural/wise to say the following in english: "[X] will be possible to be used here as [Y, ie. some function/role]"? Are there any alternatives, and if there are, are they a ...
31
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13answers
1k views

Why do I instinctively want to use the present tense with a conditional?

My boss is not a native speaker of English, so he often asks me to correct his writing. The problem is, he wants me to explain why I make changes, and doesn't accept "it just sounds better that way" ...
2
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1answer
281 views

Improper expressions of the future progressive

A thread on ELL makes me reconsider how I might naturally misuse other tenses when the future progressive is intended. For example, I might pass out work assignments in the following ways: "John, ...
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1answer
233 views

Can we use future continuous in the following sentence?

"I have instructed that the cheque latest have to be issued by 15th every month, is there any problems? Please voiced out earlier if there's any issues in future. This will be the last time I'll be ...
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1answer
300 views

“Would remain” vs. “would have remained”

What's the difference in meaning between the following two sentences? He thought that he would remain young. He thought that he would have remained young.