In grammar, a future tense is a verb form that marks the event described by the verb as not having happened yet.

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Are “I will have been going” and “I would have been going” rarely used today?

As far as I know these are tenses that you do not often use. Am I right? Will have been + verb+ing Would have been + verb+ing
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stop vs stopped?

what is the difference between; "what if we stop X" and "what if we stopped X" We are trying to write an inspirational statement, not so much a question, to provoke thought around stopping X. For ...
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“Will graduate” vs. “will be graduated” vs. “is going to graduate”

Which of the following sentences are correct? He will graduate in May. He will be graduated in May. He is going to graduate in May. Issue 1: Is the second one grammatical? Issue 2: ...
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“Boys will be boys!” Is 'will be' a future simple of 'be' or a present simple of modal auxiliary 'will'?

In the proverb: Boys will be boys! is 'will be' one verb or two? the future simple of 'be' (one verb)? or the present simple of modal auxiliary 'will' + the bare present infinitive of 'be' ...
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The word for “too far into the future to predict”, often about the state of technology

What is the word for when you can't predict the future because of the rapidly changing landscape. For example, the state of technology in the future. Due to the boost in devices in the last few ...
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6answers
454 views

Past present future all in one word?

Does the English language have a mechanism for expressing past, present and future tense simultaneously? In other words, consider the following three sentences: 1) The force was with me. 2) The ...
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133 views

Future tense in both main clause and subordinate clause

I have encountered in some grammar books that you can never have the future tense in the sub-ordinate clause when the main clause is also in the future tense. It seems to hold in conditional clauses ...
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using “in the future” at the end of a question [closed]

Just wondering if it is necessary to use in the future at the end of certain sentences. E.g. "are you expecting him to come and work for you in the future?" I know most people tend to put this at the ...
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1answer
222 views

Present tense vs. future tense following a conditional

If you ask without any background, many people are likely to assume you are just too lazy to do the work yourself. If you ask without any background, many people will likely assume you are ...
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129 views

Why the Simple-Present “closes” in “thousands will see the exhibit by the time it closes”?

Consider the sentence: Thousands of people will see the art exhibit by the time it closes. The first part of this sentence is in Future Simple, which seems correct as it is something to be ...
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4answers
9k views

“Going to go” vs “going to”

1) I am going to go watch a game. 2) I am going to a game. 3) I am going to golf. 4) I am going to go golfing. What are the differences and similarities between and among sentences ...
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Are owe and due are the opposites?

"You are due an apology" If I say that to someone then it means that I owe them an apology and not the other way around. I recently debated this with someone and they could not make sense of it and ...
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Is this correct: “Water will be being drunk by Michael”?

I started with "Michael is drinking water", which I could convert to "Water is being drunk by Michael", which I could change to the past tense as "Water was being drunk by Michael". That leads me to ...
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Can the Future Perfect be used in a main clause of a conditional sentence that has a stative/non-action verb in the if-clause?

A student asked me this question today about a sentence like: (1) If Canada's population is 40 million, the Canadian economy will have been more dynamic. I was asked if it corresponded, in a future ...
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Future tense in conditional clauses

All the textbooks I have ever come across during the course of my studying English emphasize that future tense should not be used in conditional clauses. For example, If it rains in the evening, ...
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Conditionals in the future

My colleague and I have a hot discussion about which is correct. My version is: If you don't fix the bug I will send you a patch. and his one is: I would send you a patch if you don't fix ...
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When should I use “Would”, “Would have”, “Will”, and “Will have”?

I hope someone, once and for all, can clarify (with examples) the difference in usage of will vs. would vs. would have vs. will have.
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891 views

Is phrase “will you be needing …” correct?

I'm curious about this phrase Will you be needing [...] ? It seems gramatically correct; I am also fine with "need" used in continuous time. But I'm wondering if it is used in spoken ...
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228 views

Usage of 'would' in the future tense?

Is there anything wrong in this sentence? "I would go to work tomorrow if the buses were plying." I know it is not wrong to use 'would' in hypothetical sentences in the past and present tense: ...
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102 views

“She sees in the mirror” vs. “she will see in the mirror?” [closed]

Is this sentence correct? She will grow up hating what she sees in the mirror. Or should it be: She will grow up hating what she will see in the mirror. I think first one is correct, I ...
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153 views

Future perfect or simple in this context

In a movie I saw, a young boy told to an old man that he would be gone for a long time when something happens. I'm trying to figure out what the boy actually said and what tense should have been used ...
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44 views

future clause confusion

Can I say: I will let you know what I manage to do To express that after I manage to do something (in the future) I will write/talk with the recipient.
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Is ”If I leave, it’s because Bob has arrived” ambiguous?

If I leave, it’s because Bob has arrived. Does this mean: Bob has not arrived yet. When Bob does arrive (shortly), I may leave. Bob is here now and requesting my attention. Therefore, I may ...
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“going to” vs “will”

I know several questions were asked about the difference between "going to" and "will". Based on several answers (see, for instance, here, here and here), I understood that "will" is more spontaneous ...
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3answers
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“Going to go” vs “going to”?

My significant other tells me that I'm not "going to go" to the shops, I'm "going to" the shops, and beats me mercilessly when I say that. Is this not correct? I might not be going to the shops until ...
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May I have some examples of “future perfect continuous” from fiction or literature, with references? [closed]

Question says it all and again it should be from literature or fiction. I was told that the future perfect continuous does not exist. So I am looking for examples from “real published and acclaimed ...
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Usage of future perfect

I have a question about the usage of the future perfect thingy: I know that it is used to talk about a completed action before a time in future, but is it wrong to use just plain future simple in this ...
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When should I use “shall” versus “will”?

Which is the correct use of these two words, and in which context should one be used rather than the other?
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Is this sentence in the Future Continuous?

Would be obliged if someone could clarify whether the following is in the Future Continuous tense. The Earth will be three degrees hotter by the year 2050. It seems so but I need to be ...
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When did periphrastic tenses stop being tenses?

English sometimes has several different ways of expressing the same thing. For example, it can form a possessive either by using an old case inflection: The dog’s tail was always wagging. Or it ...
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Won't followed by noun

I try to understand the song 'Sober' by band Tool. And there are couple of sentence with won't followed by pronoun or noun and without verb. For example: 'Jesus, won't you f*cking whistle nothing ...
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2answers
690 views

Simple Present for Future Actions

Why can we use the following statement when we mean future events? What time do you get there? Or should we rather say: What time will you get there? Is there a difference?
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2answers
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will be possible to be used

Is it (1) correct, (2) natural/wise to say the following in english: "[X] will be possible to be used here as [Y, ie. some function/role]"? Are there any alternatives, and if there are, are they a ...
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Why do I instinctively want to use the present tense with a conditional?

My boss is not a native speaker of English, so he often asks me to correct his writing. The problem is, he wants me to explain why I make changes, and doesn't accept "it just sounds better that way" ...
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Improper expressions of the future progressive

A thread on ELL makes me reconsider how I might naturally misuse other tenses when the future progressive is intended. For example, I might pass out work assignments in the following ways: "John, ...
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Can we use future continuous in the following sentence?

"I have instructed that the cheque latest have to be issued by 15th every month, is there any problems? Please voiced out earlier if there's any issues in future. This will be the last time I'll be ...
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Can we use should /would and /could in Future perfect tense

I would have finished my home work by evening . He should have been more careful. Can these be used as future perfect tense ?
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“Would remain” vs. “would have remained”

What's the difference in meaning between the following two sentences? He thought that he would remain young. He thought that he would have remained young.
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question about the future tense

In a sentence like How do you get to the train station? What would be an appropriate answer (tense wise)? Could you say both of these two: I’ll drive you. I’m going to drive you. ...
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How would you use “can” in a future sentence?

If you purchase this then you will be able to do that. How can I write the above statement using "can"?
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4answers
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“will be able to” vs. “can”

Consider the following: He will be able to do it. He can do it. They mean the same thing, right? Can "can" replace "will be able to" in any sentence? What is the difference, if anything? ...
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2k views

Is “even if…” followed by present or future tense? [duplicate]

Is it correct to say: even if only James Bond will benefit from... or even if only James Bond benefits from...
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3answers
10k views

“If I go..” vs. “If I will go..” referring to the future [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Future tense in conditional clauses Which one is correct? option 1: If I go there, I can meet her or option 2: If I will go there, I can meet her I clearly ...
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5answers
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“When I am 18, I will…” or “When I will be 18, I will…” [duplicate]

Should I say: When I am 18, I'll take my driving test or When I'll be 18, I'll take my driving test Which one is the correct sentence?
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2answers
429 views

Future Passive Progressive? [duplicate]

Does some future passive progressive tense exist, such as: He will be being interviewed by police." as a counterpart to the past passive progressive tense, such as: He was being ...
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150 views

“I stay in Canada” vs. “I will stay in Canada” [duplicate]

Situation: I am in Canada and will go back to Hong Kong next week. So, I want to tell my friends that "I will stay in Canada until the 6th of March". Question: I do not know if the word will should ...
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1answer
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Is there a difference between 'eventually' and 'in the future'? [closed]

I was at a yoga class and the instructor said something about how a posture will 'eventually or in the future allow you to roll your spine out.'. And then I wanted to know, is there a difference ...
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Saying about many related events in the future

My question relates to these questions : Conditionals in the future Future tense in conditional clauses “If I go..” vs. “If I will go..” referring to the future About two mutually related, future ...
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“has”+perfect in reported speech of the future

(1) I will jump out from behind the couch. Then I will tell him: "I have been in the room all along." (2) I will pronounce him dead. Then I will tell him: "You have been pronounced dead." ...
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2answers
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“The more time a person invests” vs. 'the more time a person will invest'

Consider the following two sentences: Because the more time a person invests into specific interests, the better their results. Because the more time a person will invest into their specific ...