In grammar, a future tense is a verb form that marks the event described by the verb as not having happened yet.

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Is every sentence in a tense?

I know that "tense" indicates time. If that is true, then not every sentence can be indicated of its tense. Please review these sentences: "If I could go to the market , I must have taken breakfast ...
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What tense is “If I were a bird, I could fly”

The sentence is not referring to any time past, present of future. It's just referring to an imaginary condition which has never existed and seemingly will never exist. Still, the sentence and other ...
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1answer
841 views

Question about the future “tense”

My daughter, who is in the 4th grade, was asked to answer questions about the following sentence: What time can you meet us at the school on Tuesday? She was asked questions about the usage of ...
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1answer
96 views

Won't followed by noun

I try to understand the song 'Sober' by band Tool. And there are couple of sentence with won't followed by pronoun or noun and without verb. For example: 'Jesus, won't you f*cking whistle nothing ...
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4answers
249 views

A prediction made in the past that affects something we will do in the future

Please ignore the factual accuracy of this sentence and focus on the tenses used. If the Mayans were wrong to end the calendar on Dec. 20, 2012, we'll use your donation to fund 2013 programming. ...
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1answer
531 views

Future perfect or Future perfect continuous in the following sentence?

I am not sure why this sentence is incorrect from tense's perspective. It is certain that the construction of the road will be completed by the winter of 2014. Also, according to my book its ...
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1answer
144 views

Specific and unspecific future

According to ENGLISHPAGE.com, if the Past Perfect action did occur at a specific time, the Simple Past can be used instead of the Past Perfect when "before" or "after" is used in the sentence. The ...
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4answers
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“going to” vs “will”

I know several questions were asked about the difference between "going to" and "will". Based on several answers (see, for instance, here, here and here), I understood that "will" is more spontaneous ...
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9answers
424 views

How do I ask “when” without implying past or future?

"When did or will the event happen?" — This sounds silly to me. To make matters worse, I would like to use passive voice because the question is in reference to a statement that uses passive voice. ...
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2answers
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will be possible to be used

Is it (1) correct, (2) natural/wise to say the following in english: "[X] will be possible to be used here as [Y, ie. some function/role]"? Are there any alternatives, and if there are, are they a ...
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2answers
192 views

Importance and relevance (and accuracy) of the distinctions of the two forms of the future simple tense [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are the guidelines for usage of “will” and “is/are going to”? I am an ESL teacher in Thailand at a business college. I have been plagued ...
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2answers
2k views

Is this correct: “Water will be being drunk by Michael”?

I started with "Michael is drinking water", which I could convert to "Water is being drunk by Michael", which I could change to the past tense as "Water was being drunk by Michael". That leads me to ...
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3answers
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“I am going to have to”, “I have to”, and “I will have to”

What is the difference between these two: I am going to have to see you sometime. I have to see you sometime. When would you use the first one? On that note, how is . . . I will have to see ...
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5answers
657 views

“In” vs. “after” for future talk

The class will be over in 10 minutes. The class will be over after 10 minutes. I know the first is correct but why?
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1answer
160 views

About two mutually related, future actions [closed]

Is it correct to say: "I will do that thing when I will talk to him."?
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4answers
13k views

“Going to go” vs “going to”

1) I am going to go watch a game. 2) I am going to a game. 3) I am going to golf. 4) I am going to go golfing. What are the differences and similarities between and among sentences ...
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3answers
793 views

The use of “will” in assumptions

We can use will for both past and future assumptions. But how do we differentiate if it refers to past assurance or future possibility? For example: You will know all about Rachel, of course. ...
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2answers
1k views

What's the difference between “he's going to start walking” and “he's going to walk”? [closed]

What's the difference between "he's going to start walking" and "he's going to walk"? Are there any shades of meaning here?
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2answers
294 views

“how soon I get” vs. “how soon I will get”

What is the difference between the following: It depends on how soon I get my visa. It depends on how soon I will get my visa.
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2answers
528 views

“rain was coming till tomorrow”

I am asking this question on behalf of a friend of mine. Do tell me, can and when or why can we use past form when we predict something in the future. I agree the phrase is not full. Anyway, the ...
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2answers
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The real tense of “I'm going to be talking about”

I just listened to a video in which the speaker said "I'm going to be talking about....". Can we change that to "I'm going to talk about..."?
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3answers
832 views

Past simple vs present perfect in this example

Could you explain to me please what is the difference between these. It is meant to express that I will let him know AFTER I picked/have picked a car. I'll let you know which one I picked ...
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1answer
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Using 'would' to talk about past with examples

The following are sentences, I would take the dogs out on a walk. I would have took the dogs out on a walk. I would took the dogs out on a walk. I understood them as follows: Possible action to ...
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3answers
155 views

Is “the benefits of this will much more” correct? [closed]

Is this sentence correct? The benefits of this will much more or it should be like this: The benefits of this will be much more
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2answers
327 views

Scientific article style: present or future

This question often pops up when writing scientific articles. Which of the two is preferred? This issue is described in detail in Section 4. or This issue will be described in detail in ...
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5answers
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“Will graduate” vs. “will be graduated” vs. “is going to graduate”

Which of the following sentences are correct? He will graduate in May. He will be graduated in May. He is going to graduate in May. Issue 1: Is the second one grammatical? Issue 2: ...
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1answer
334 views

Pronunciation of “'ll”

How do I read the following sentences (especially in conversational speech)? The dog'll eat the bones. Tom'll go to school. Anna'll come tomorrow. I mean the sound of 'll.
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3answers
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“… is about to …” vs. “… is going to …”

I found that is about to is used in the following sentence of the news article titled “Tech belt sees hiring surge” in The Boston Globe. “The company is about to go on a hiring spree, from ...
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3answers
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“will you be going home” vs. “will you go home”

What's the difference between saying; Will you be going home this summer? Will you go home this summer? Are there any differences between these in written or spoken English?
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3answers
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“Will” and “Going To”. What are the real differences of the colloquial usage of them?

I'm from Brasil and here we study the differences of using "Will" and "Going to" to talk about the future. But it is usually very confusing because we have a different kind of conjugation that uses no ...
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2answers
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Will be going to get engaged

Is it okay to say: He will be going to get engaged to his ex-girl friend. Is there a better of saying this?
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1answer
460 views

“The more you (will) ask them, the harder it will be”

Is this correct? The more you will ask them, the harder it will be. Should I use The more you ask them, the harder it will be instead?
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1answer
610 views

“It will depend on what I [will] see”

I want to refer to the future. When someone asks me: "what are you going to do when you have a chance to look at [something]?". How should I reply? Basically, the question is which one is correct (or ...
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2answers
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Why is it “time we ate” and not “time we eat”?

Why do we use the simple past but not the present or future in the following expressions: Don't you think it's time we went a little further Don't you think it's time we ate Don't you ...
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Analogue of “most recent” for events in the future

In the context of a listing of events that are time-based, it is common to use "Most Recent" to describe a listing of events ordered by date, in descending order, with the upper limit being today's ...
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3answers
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“If I go..” vs. “If I will go..” referring to the future [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Future tense in conditional clauses Which one is correct? option 1: If I go there, I can meet her or option 2: If I will go there, I can meet her I clearly ...
2
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3answers
391 views

The next century will begin on the 1st of January 2001

In a test, I was asked to choose between will and be going to forms in a sentence expressing futurity: The next century __ (to begin) on the 1st of January 2001. My guess is that the choice ...
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4answers
568 views

Can I use future tense here?

I know future tense cannot be used in time clauses. I would like to know, is the following incorrect? You have to launch the game and quit the game before the file will show up. I think it is as ...
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Shorter version of “is going to be”

I've just read question: Alternative to "is going to be" I got similar problem, but in my case I need to describe something that might happen in the future. The sentence is "Project ...
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2answers
210 views

The Use of Present Simple

I asked this question on a different site but I didn't get an answer. Could you tell me what use of present simple this is? They come to dinner tonight. Is this a situation that often or ...
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“The train will leave” vs. “is going to leave” vs. “leaves” vs. “is leaving”

From the grammatical point of view all are correct, just the meaning are different, please bring your clarification, thank you. The Train will leave at 10:00 tomorrow morning. The Train is ...
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What tense should be used here?

Is use of present simple correct in these examples? My daughter goes to school tomorrow [for the first time]. I go to school to talk to my daughter's teacher tomorrow [and this happens ...
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2answers
720 views

Alternative to “is going to be”

I want to find a synonym to "is going to be" in a sentence like: "X is going to be outdated after Y joins X". I could have chosen "will be", but I want something more incisive, and less "in the ...
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3answers
360 views

“One way would be” vs “One way will be”?

What is the difference between "One way would be" and "One way will be"? Can both of them be used for future actions?
2
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3answers
3k views

Differences between ways to express future actions

I asked this question on a different site but I haven't gotten a useful answer. Could you tell me the difference in meaning between these sentences? Do you think you will visit them next week? ...
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5answers
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Future tense in conditional clauses

All the textbooks I have ever come across during the course of my studying English emphasize that future tense should not be used in conditional clauses. For example, If it rains in the evening, ...
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2answers
744 views

Simple Present for Future Actions

Why can we use the following statement when we mean future events? What time do you get there? Or should we rather say: What time will you get there? Is there a difference?
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4answers
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Is 'I will definitely be living away from the shop' correct?

I want to say that I'm definitely going to change my address and live elsewhere, but I don't know the exact day when I'm going to live there, it will happen in a time of one year. Or should I use: 'I ...
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3answers
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Would vs Will in future events

What is the difference between the following: Sorry, mate. I wouldn't be able to come for dinner. Sorry, mate. I won't be able to come for dinner.
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Present Continuous or Present Simple in a Meeting

Which one of the following should be used if I am asking about an event or a meeting: Are we meeting today? Do we have a meeting today? Are we going to have a meeting today? Are we going ...