In grammar, a future tense is a verb form that marks the event described by the verb as not having happened yet.

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Present instead of future?

I keep noticing that native speakers often times use present tense when, to my mind, they should use future: If you go straight, you (will) see a building. I can (will be able to) give you $5 ...
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21 views

Use of periphrastic do in future tense

I would like to know if the use of periphrastic do in the future tense is possible in English (whether in a special way or in a particular dialect of English) like in Breton (it's a correct form for ...
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39 views

Future Progressive tense [duplicate]

I'm quite good at English,but not adept in it. Over a period of time I've gotten a good grip over it and I could ponder a lot about grammar in detail. I've doubt regarding the following Qs. and need ...
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57 views

Will / Going to [duplicate]

I'm having some troubles with the usage of will and going to in the future tense. I have searched this problem all over Google, but I can't seem to find the universal explanation (for example, one ...
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75 views

The future tense (will / going to )? [closed]

Could anyone answer this then explain correctly? Choose : Be careful, you ..... your hand with that knife . will cut / are going to cut /are cutting
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3answers
761 views

Future Tense of Modal Verbs

All normal verbs can be conjugated in the future tense. e.g. I know, I will know. I do, I will do. But I have noticed that we cannot conjugate the modal verb can in the future tense. can, I ...
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2answers
71 views

present continuous vs future continuous

"Can I come and stay with you and Dad?" "Of course, dear. How long do you think you [____] (verb to stay)?" The question is, is it "are going to stay" or "are staying" (or some other choice), ...
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61 views

'could have + past participle' to talk about possible events in the future

BACKGROUND In this earlier thread, Edwin Ashworth approved a use of 'could have + past participle' for the future event that was precluded by context as in: (1) Mary could have arrived tomorrow, ...
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74 views

I am learning English because I will need it when I go abroad

Which ones of the following could be correct: I am learning English because I will need it when I go abroad. I am learning English because I need it when I go abroad. What I imply is that I ...
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1answer
43 views

Future Perfect and Future Simple [closed]

Which one of these sentences is correct? In ten years, flights from Medan to Papua will take less than an hour. or In ten years, flights from Medan to Papua will have taken less than an ...
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2answers
157 views

“I hope you'll do X” vs. “I hope you do X”

Both "I hope you'll read lots of good books this year" and "I hope you read lots of good books this year" are correct, right? Is one of them more common than the other? Is there any difference ...
2
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1answer
110 views

Is “the worst is yet to come” a future form for inanimate objects?

I hope the answers to this question will benefit anyone who studies English. I would like to understand the purpose of this future form in English: something + is/are + to + verb. At school we ...
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3answers
185 views

Mixing tenses in past tense fiction

In past tense works (novels, etc.) is there a place for some present tense verbs, such as "think" or "know" or "was." Example: I turned to leave, and he didn't try to stop me. I think I surprised ...
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83 views

Does the verb 'prophesy' have a future tense or equivalent? [closed]

I was writing for a paper and was trying to write that a character will say a prophecy later in the story and was going to write "will prophecize" or something (although that is wrong according to ...
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1answer
94 views

two months later vs in two months

I've come across the adverb 'later' in the past tense to refer to something that takes place at a time following an earlier time e.g. "He resigned two months later" I wonder if we can also use it ...
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315 views

..until the issue will be resolved. WILL?

I always thought you cannot use a future tense after "until" or "unless". But recently, in a very famous IT system, I found the following: An estimate of how much work remains until this issue ...
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2answers
61 views

Usage of the Future Tense with a Conditional containing “unless”

Unless the plane encounters unexpected turbulence, it ------- in Iceland shortly before 5 P.M. In this conditional sentence using "unless", should the blank be filled with: 1) is arriving, 2) will ...
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2answers
174 views

Putative should - what time does it express? [closed]

Here are some examples with the putative should. What is the factor which indicates the time reference expressed by the putative should in the examples? Being a foreigner to English I find it hard to ...
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2answers
121 views

How often do we use the “future perfect continuous” in everyday conversation? [closed]

Consider the following usage I will have eaten pizza by 5pm I will have been eating pizza How often do we use this type of grammatical structure? Honestly, I have never heard anyone using it ...
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41 views

Give you or Give it to you [closed]

I will give you I will give it to you Which one is correct?
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2answers
161 views

Is “will be going to” correct?

I was doing english exercises about the different types of future, when I saw "will be going to" among the answers I could give to a question. I've never heard it before, my teacher says it can be ...
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1answer
299 views

Doesn't, Isn't, or Won't? Which is correct?

I'm currently teaching Side by Side 4 and I'm quite confused which is the right answer for the activity. Page 68 teaches two phrases "I hope it rains tomorrow" and "I hope it doesn't rain tomorrow". ...
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1answer
363 views

By this time tomorrow or at this time tomorrow or tomorrow at this time

I will be watching a movie at this time tomorrow. I will be watching a movie tomorrow at this time. I will be watching a movie by this time tomorrow. Which one is correct to use? Please ...
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3answers
137 views

Which is correct and what's the difference: “Next time I'll need <something>, I'll …”, or “Next time I need <something>, I'll”?

English is not my native language, so I've question about using the future tense. Which is correct: Next time I'll need <something>, I'll ... or Next time I need <something>, I'll ... ...
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63 views

Exceptions that allow the use of “will” after “if” [duplicate]

This as what I've been able to establish: The use of "will" after "if" is legal only when any of the following conditions apply: The "will" is used as a verb (equivalent to "want"), for example, ...
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31 views

“You are going to want to” vs “You will want to” [duplicate]

So I was going to say something the other day like "After eating this, you are going to want to go there." I wanted to express that after eating that, the person would end up with a wish about ...
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69 views

Usage of the future perfect tense: “… a year will have completed…” Is it correct? [closed]

Is the following sentence correct? By the end of September, a year will have completed for our friendship.
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216 views

'future in the future' tense in English?

I had an idea for a trilogy of novels with the first written in the past tense, the second in the present tense, and the third in the future tense. Why hasn't anyone done this before? I thought. Then ...
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2answers
98 views

Using future simple tense in a thesis

Being a non-native speaker, I have of course a bit of a problem with writing my thesis in English. In the thesis, I propose a software solution and I describe it. What I am not sure is: should I use ...
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5answers
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“It is to be discussed”, what is the infinitive doing in this sentence?

It is to be discussed. Is be + infinitive forming the future tense here? You are to be dressed and ready by 8:00. I was thinking it's almost commanding (or speaking of a command) but this ...
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1answer
371 views

could and might to talk about future possibility

I have problem with using could in the future possibilities for example: They have the technology, but unless the government makes stricter laws, car companies ____ do it. With which one should I ...
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2answers
168 views

Will marry vs will get married [duplicate]

I have seen both sentences below: I will get married. I will marry. So what is the difference? Which one is recommended? Is there any difference in meaning or just grammar?
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Using “will” after “if”

I've been told that native-speakers don't ever use "will" after "if", and that saying it this way is a not-native style. So from the film (Harry Potter, pt5) I noticed a line that confused me. Look ...
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101 views

Future tense and future perfect tense [closed]

Given two sentences: If we goad him into doing what he should have been doing all along, then it will be a smashing success. and If we goad him into doing what he should have been doing all ...
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238 views

Shall, third person singular, archaic form

The second person of will and shall are wilt and shalt in the archaic form. The third person singular suffix is -eth, so we get willeth but what about shall? Thank you for your answers!
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Do I say “I am going” or “I will be going”? [duplicate]

Which sounds more correct? I am going to the post office in 2 hours I will be going to the post office in 2 hours Is there any difference between the two sentences?
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Difference between: “would be”, “will be”, and “is/are -ing”

Which one is correct? Heard you would be going. Heard you will be going. Heard you are going. What differences are there?
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shall+be+ ing Verb structure [duplicate]

Why does one use shall+be+ing instead of will? What are the functions of be and V+ing? I shall be focusing on the mechanisms that govern individual`s choices at and beyond school-leaving age and ...
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115 views

“Obama is in town this weekend” or “Obama will be in town this weekend” [duplicate]

A friend of mine used the following phrase to tell me about Obama's visit to Malaysia this weekend (he told me this when it was not already the weekend): Obama is in town this weekend. This ...
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2answers
4k views

It will be done at that point in the future vs It will have been done at that point

I am struggling with understanding the difference here: It will be done at that point in the future. It will have been done at point in the future. I know in theory what future perfect tense means ...
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Is the use of future tense (especially “will” and “shall”) going out of grammar?

My English teacher taught us that there is no such thing called "future tense" in existence. Instead we were asked to use present indefinite tense. He said that we should use "I am to go to London" ...
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2answers
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stop vs stopped?

what is the difference between; "what if we stop X" and "what if we stopped X" We are trying to write an inspirational statement, not so much a question, to provoke thought around stopping X. For ...
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3answers
169 views

“Boys will be boys!” Is 'will be' a future simple of 'be' or a present simple of modal auxiliary 'will'?

In the proverb: Boys will be boys! is 'will be' one verb or two? the future simple of 'be' (one verb)? or the present simple of modal auxiliary 'will' + the bare present infinitive of 'be' ...
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2answers
282 views

The word for “too far into the future to predict”, often about the state of technology

What is the word for when you can't predict the future because of the rapidly changing landscape. For example, the state of technology in the future. Due to the boost in devices in the last few ...
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6answers
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Past present future all in one word?

Does the English language have a mechanism for expressing past, present and future tense simultaneously? In other words, consider the following three sentences: 1) The force was with me. 2) The ...
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Are “I will have been going” and “I would have been going” rarely used today?

As far as I know these are tenses that you do not often use. Am I right? Will have been + verb+ing Would have been + verb+ing
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322 views

Future tense in both main clause and subordinate clause

I have encountered in some grammar books that you can never have the future tense in the sub-ordinate clause when the main clause is also in the future tense. It seems to hold in conditional clauses ...
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Are owe and due are the opposites?

"You are due an apology" If I say that to someone then it means that I owe them an apology and not the other way around. I recently debated this with someone and they could not make sense of it and ...
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Present tense vs. future tense following a conditional

If you ask without any background, many people are likely to assume you are just too lazy to do the work yourself. If you ask without any background, many people will likely assume you are ...
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Why the Simple-Present “closes” in “thousands will see the exhibit by the time it closes”?

Consider the sentence: Thousands of people will see the art exhibit by the time it closes. The first part of this sentence is in Future Simple, which seems correct as it is something to be ...