Questions about English relating to French.

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53 views

Is -age as in garage, mirage, barrage a suffix?

So -age as in bondage, message is a suffix since it's active in creating non-Norman words such as shrinkage (with the Saxon stem shrink), slippage (Saxon slip). What about the more recent -age as in ...
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1answer
60 views

Why isn't “chez” used as a preposition in English?

From consulting a number of online English dictionaries, "chez" means "in the home of" or "at the home of" in French. So, for example, "Chez Panisse" translates to "at the home of Panisse". But, as ...
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55 views

Did 'inter-' evolve to mean 'together'?

entertain (v.) (<--) late 15c., "to keep up, maintain, to keep (someone) in a certain frame of mind," from Middle French entretenir, from Old French entretenir "hold together, stick together,...
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37 views

“à la carte” in the context outside dining

I have seen à la carte several times on a menu which means what it original meant, something separate from a package, you have to pay extra to order it separately. However, this word has gone way ...
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37 views

“communicative support” or “communicative media” or …?

How would you say if you are working (at the same time) on a book, a video documentary, website and periodical publication. I'm looking for a short term that would summarize this activity. what ...
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67 views

What is special about Anglo-French legal usage of [the] infinitive as a noun?

I was reading the etymology of attainder (n.), when I saw its reference to: use of French infinitives as nouns, especially in legal language, see waiver. waiver (n.) [<--] [...] Other ...
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100 views

Polarly opposite connotations of 'head'?

Such aphorisms as 'Think With Your Head, Not Your Heart' connote positivity of the noun 'head', but such English words as heady and testy connote negativity. So why this clash and polarity of ...