This tag is for questions regarding formal, versus informal words and usage.

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2answers
22 views

Use of 'this' – relates to the directly preceding noun

I am a german native speaker. I am currently in the finishing stages of writing a thesis. One of my advisors (English is his mother tongue) provided feedback on the language of my writing. One point ...
-1
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2answers
38 views

Cite authors or inform the reader that these guys made it?

I writing a research paper in which I want to say that Paul Viola and Michael Jones (authors behind a framework) made this framework. What is the more formal way of saying this?
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2answers
170 views

Is there a word in English that essentially means “I” or “we” in formal context?

In Swedish there is a word, "undertecknad", which would refer the author of a piece of text. It is an expression used in formal context when you try to objectify yourself (and avoid saying "I") out of ...
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1answer
73 views

“call someone/something” vs. “call someone/something up” for "make a phone call to someone/something

What's the difference between call and call up to mean make a telephone call to? Is the latter any more informal than the former, or is it mainly a regional thing? call someone or something up ...
-1
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1answer
131 views

To “opt-out” or to “withdraw”?

Which is more formal in register, opt-out of something or withdraw from something? Are there any more formal ways to phrase the idea?
-1
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1answer
245 views

“tabloid” or “tabloid newpsaper”?

Is it considered informal to refer to tabloid and broadsheet newspapers as a "tabloid" and "broadsheet", as opposed to "tabloid newspaper" and "broadsheet newspaper"? I'm writing a piece in the style ...
2
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0answers
50 views

When writing an informal letter, is it advisable to use the em rule at all?

I must point out before explaining my situation that I'm an English learner. However, for this question I need the help of an expert; that's why I'm asking here and not in ELL. When writing an ...
1
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0answers
22 views

Omitting the verb and complement in an answer

I was watching Person of Interest, where this bit of conversation happened: -We can't leave him here. -I'm not. As in "I'm not leaving him here". Even though it's perfectly understandable, ...
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0answers
38 views

Neither A nor B

As a native speaker, the basic usage of "neither" and "nor" are perfectly clear to me. However, natives may suffer from colloquial usage sounding more normal than formal grammar. I definitely have ...
1
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0answers
20 views

In a thesis work, what form I should use to indicate a website names?

in the specific, I have one o more website that acts as subject in a sentence, I'm wondering if it is correct and if I should use the quotation marks e.g.: www.amazon.com is the only present in ...
1
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0answers
314 views

Professional Engineering-related Business Letter

For one of my Engineering Courses, I had to write a professional Business Letter to inform my hypothetical employer of my analysis about two alternatives, and which one of them is better. For this ...
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0answers
34 views

Greetings after saying Hello in noon, afternoon and evening in formal visits

In morning we usually say Good Morning. But what about noon, afternoon and evening. In informal visits we can use 'how u doing', 'what's up', 'how are you'. But what about formal situations? What ...
0
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0answers
20 views

Can I start a sentence with “To do so,..”

Ex: I will cook a rabbit. To do so, I will have to hunt one in the forest. Is this construction correct? Can it be used in a formal sentence? Thanks a lot!
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0answers
30 views

What is a word for an entity which only provides a predefined set of tasks but doesn't want to engage new types of tasks?

Let's assume an entity was created to satisfy a predefined set of tasks, and cannot accommodate other new types of tasks. What is a formal word for this? For example, a service provider provider ...
0
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0answers
39 views

“Am I (ever) [adj.] ” vs. “How [adj.] I am”

What's the difference between saying, Boy, am I happy to see you again! Damn, am I ever lucky to have a friend like you! -and- Boy, how happy I am to see you again! Damn, how lucky ...
0
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0answers
63 views

Opposite of 'buckle up'

If I wanted a kid in my car to fasten his/her seatbelt, I'd say 'Buckle up!'. It is an informal expression, and I'm wondering if there is a phrasal verb with the opposite meaning (to unfasten/...
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0answers
34 views

Noun and Adjective position

In a formal engineering document about an HTML file, a colleague of mine wrote the next thing (starting a sentence): Tag <color> shall be repeated at least 5 times [...] (For the sake of ...
0
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0answers
28 views

Is “The first thing” too casual for an academic paper?

Suppose I'm writing an academic paper. Is, "The first thing" in "The first thing that I want to challenge is the idea that..." too informal? If so, is there a more formal phrase I can put there ...
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0answers
54 views

CV writing help - grammar question

I'm preparing my CV for an internship (here is a link for my cv - Click). I'm concerned about these sentences: 1-Taking the course by Gedik University 2-Joined the Erasmus Student Exchange ...
0
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0answers
96 views

Asking a boss to be if agreement still holds?

I'm awaiting for my employment contract to arrive, which is one week overdue. How do I ask my employer to be if our agreement made over the phone is still in force without looking annoying or ...
0
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0answers
106 views

Which terms are used to describe language usage?

When trying to explain the usage of words in French to English speakers, I'm handicapped by my lack of vocabulary to describe when words are used. Looking in dictionaries for the French terms give me ...
0
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0answers
111 views

Is there a formal version of “as is” for a program

I am trying to summarize 3 phrases in one (if this is possible) for a program: 1. Program is provided "as is" 2. Program is provided for testing purposes 3. Program is provided for trial purposes (...
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0answers
473 views

Is “per se” used more in formal or informal situations?

What is the formality level of "per se"?
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0answers
23 views

“You do it” Stressing on the first person

There is an expression in my language which stresses on the person you are talking to. You would expect it in any informal conversation like this Person1: Wash the car, Jack. Jack: You do ...