This tag is for questions regarding formal, versus informal words and usage.

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0
votes
1answer
1k views

Indulge/Kill/Satisfy my curiosity

I have few questions for my customer and I want to say him that it is just my curiosity. What is the right sentence which I can use to deal with my customers so that they won't find it funny or ...
0
votes
3answers
739 views

Is “aha” an appropriate answer to “thank you”?

I have heard many native speakers in the United states answer with a brief and cold "aha" when someone says "thank you". Is it really appropriate to answer like that? I myself feel offended when I ...
8
votes
8answers
8k views

A more formal word for 'Screwed.' [closed]

Hi I'm doing a formal writing essay and I'm using a phrase from an online source. In this phrase it has Your screwed. Would I get away with having this phrase in the essay? If not what is an ...
3
votes
2answers
7k views

What do you say to wish your fellows a good lunch? [duplicate]

It's lunch time, you joined a table with people, you are about to start eating, but just a moment before you do so, you want to wish everyone a good lunch. If they were French you would say: Bon ...
0
votes
1answer
111 views

Informal Version of 'Respectively' [duplicate]

When I say: The board and council meetings will be held on the 5th and the 6th of this month, respectively. it seems to be the proper way to say it and it sounds correct . But when I say: ...
0
votes
2answers
12k views

Does “is that ok for you?” means the same of “does that work for you?”

Do they mean exactly the same? Is one form more formal/casual than other? Can I say one of them in a email that is not very formal?
0
votes
0answers
110 views

Is there a formal version of “as is” for a program

I am trying to summarize 3 phrases in one (if this is possible) for a program: 1. Program is provided "as is" 2. Program is provided for testing purposes 3. Program is provided for trial purposes (...
19
votes
4answers
3k views

Avoiding stuffy language: “Therefore”, “Thus”

In my thesis, I'm using "thus" and "therefore" a lot. This is repetitive and it sounds stuffy. Is there any alternative which sounds a bit more relaxed but is acceptable in scientific writing? "So" ...
-1
votes
1answer
130 views

To “opt-out” or to “withdraw”?

Which is more formal in register, opt-out of something or withdraw from something? Are there any more formal ways to phrase the idea?
1
vote
2answers
2k views

How to properly say “the email that I've sent you”? [closed]

What would be the most formal way to say the following: I wanted to see your thoughts about the email that I sent you last Thursday. I am a little unsure about "the email that I sent you". I feel ...
1
vote
2answers
595 views

What's a formal way to say something is “happening”?

What is a formal way to say something has a lot of activity in it? I can only think of two informal ways to say it. For example: This field of physics is very "happening" right now. This field of ...
2
votes
2answers
371 views

How to distinguish formal words from informal words?

As an English Learner, how can I distinguish (or recognise) formal words from informal words. Also, formal sentences from informal sentences. For example: So/Then/Therefore/Thus and many others. Are ...
2
votes
2answers
212 views

The quality of things you stick with

I was wondering if there is a word in English to describe the quality of things we stick with. For example, if a training is well designed, people will tend to keep using it. Meanwhile, if it's not, ...
0
votes
2answers
135 views

When we are making a project in a group, how can we say that sentence?

Hello I'm preparing a CV in English. What is the formal way of saying I'm in an project? This sentences below are valid or not ? Thanks. I'm included to a project. I have been enrolled to a project. ...
2
votes
1answer
653 views

Is it correct to say ''you ARE to be back here before dark'' [duplicate]

I'm reading a novel and a character says this line:''you ARE to be back here before dark'' but I could not find this usage of the verb to be in my dictionary, so here I ask you if this is informal ...
0
votes
2answers
171 views

the slang contraction of “what'd he” as in the sentence “what'd he come at you with”

What is the slang contraction of "What'd he" as in the sentence "What'd he come at you with"? "What'd he" is already a contraction but I mean in the same manner like whatcha = what're you=what've you, ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Alternative for “particularly interested” [closed]

What are other formal ways of saying "I'm particularly interested in..."? In this case it's for use on cover letters for CVs. The synonyms for "interested" offered by the thesaurus don't seem ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

Is the word 'cocksure' considered informal, non-PC, or even vulgar?

None of the following resources seem to think so: Merriam-Webster, The Free Dictionary, Oxford Dictionaries, Collins. But Cambridge Dictionaries Online says it is informal. And it appears on Urban ...
4
votes
5answers
4k views

Is there a formal word for people that are local to a place? [closed]

I wish to write about the people and language of a city I recently visited in an essay. Is there a word for people who are local to a place?
37
votes
14answers
6k views

What can be used as formal euphemism of “hack”?

I'm writing a technical document, and I need to convey the fact that we had to find a non-optimal, non-orthodox solution that was adopted as the best available alternative (a hack) to solve an ...
5
votes
11answers
1k views

What is a formal equivalent of “get (a)round something”?

I'm writing a formal letter and I have to use the verb "get round something" (BrE) or "get around something" (AmE) to express a way of finding an alternate solution to deal with a problem. Quoting the ...
0
votes
0answers
470 views

Is “per se” used more in formal or informal situations?

What is the formality level of "per se"?
1
vote
1answer
173 views

Acceptability of Gonna, Wanna [closed]

How acceptable is it to use wanna, gonna, etc in business or more formal US environments?
4
votes
4answers
729 views

Why do some people say “My name is Doctor / Dr. X” instead of “I'm Doctor / Dr. X”?

I'm Portuguese and I live in Portugal. Here it's (still) common to see some people using their academic/professional title in introductions: "Hi, I'm Doctor / Dr. / Eng. X". However, when watching ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

What is a formal word meaning “paid off”?

I can not think of any way to say paid off in a formal way. Susan’s speech and struggle during those rough times has _______.
1
vote
1answer
557 views

A formal synonym for “to be asked to do something” [closed]

I'm looking for a formal synonym for the phrase and counting on your help. I was wondering about "request" like in "The guests are requested to wear appropriate attire.", but it doesn't sound good for ...
0
votes
4answers
119 views

Does this sentence sound awkward? [closed]

"Unlike my specific ancestry, he is a biracial individual with roots in Asia and in U.S." I'm having trouble especially in the first section, where I am trying to show that my friend's background is ...
2
votes
1answer
472 views

abbreviation in academic papers [duplicate]

During the paper writing, a question came up into my mind: can abbreviations be used in these articles? There are at least 2 kinds of abbreviations, one is the so-called terminologies(or jargons?) ...
0
votes
1answer
93 views

a private friend x a close friend [closed]

What would be the best way to express intimacy with a friend? A close friend = It would be a friend who doesn't like to talk about? A private Friend = It would be a close friend? I am very confused....
4
votes
2answers
7k views

Formal way to say “I believe”

I am writing a chapter in a book and I want to say that "I believe that this researcher is right ....", in a more formal way. Can I say "The present author believes ....."
2
votes
2answers
626 views

Thanks. You got it

Can "You got it, dude " be used as a reply to "thank you" in informal English?
0
votes
3answers
1k views

How to formally say “I just would like to get this over with, so you and I do not have to think about it any more” [closed]

I am currently in a state where my former employee does not respond to my email. I am tired of bothering them. I do not know if my email is blocked, but I do not think it hurts to write things ...
0
votes
2answers
748 views

Less formal synonym for “Confirmed”, “Acknowledged”

I'm looking for a less formal synonym for "Confirmed" or "Ackowledged", that retains some brevity. As an example, say I've received an e-mail from my manager asking me to switch to a different task. ...
1
vote
1answer
106 views

Starting a book with this sentence, is it ok? [closed]

I'd like to start a book with a sentence like this: This book is about X, so why should it start with Y? In fact, the book is already written, but I'd like to get the first few pages absolutely ...
1
vote
2answers
221 views

What is a more formal way of saying “get certifications”?

I would like to create a sentence, in which I express, that I have (successfully) gotten a few certifications, but I feel like this sounds too informal for a letter of application. Has anyone got a ...
1
vote
2answers
13k views

What is a word similar to FYI but not objective/neutral

FYI can be used in an email to inform the person reading the email about some information. It is comfortable using this between peers. But what if the mail is intended to inform someone higher in the ...
6
votes
4answers
1k views

Word for a “Male Mistress”

Is the male version of a mistress, a mastress? It's a term I would use, but I don't know if it is just slang or if it is formal... P.S. I mean a male that sleeps with a married woman (love, not ...
1
vote
2answers
19k views

Is it unprofessional to say “Sorry for my English”? [closed]

First of all I am sorry if this is wrong forum for this question. I have come in a situation recently where I was needed to write a mail to a foreign company. And as you probably noticed by now my ...
0
votes
1answer
837 views

Time period in a date period [closed]

I want to mention the date and time I collected my questionnaires in an academic report. Let's say they are distributed: Time period: 1:00PM - 4:00PM Date period: 1 October 2014 - 3 October ...
2
votes
1answer
144 views

How to best include an introductory phrase before getting to the point? [closed]

This question may seem too large in scope from the title, but here's the preface to the answer I seek. I need to inform my hiring manager (HM) that I have served my last day with my current ...
11
votes
14answers
31k views

What is a good verb to describe the pleasant sound of rain?

Last week, I was up the whole night working in my house in my ultra-quiet neighborhood. Around 3 am, a thunderstorm started and broke the silence of the night. I enjoyed the sound of rain on my window ...
1
vote
4answers
315 views

Word for an Original Idea

Is there a good word for an idea that someone came up with on their own? I'm talking about an original idea. The reason I want such a word is for my notes so that I can annotate, with as few words ...
0
votes
3answers
327 views

'Was' or 'were' with 'period' & 'eleven years' [duplicate]

I was reading a letter I got from an old friend, back in 1998, and at a certain point she wrote: "Our period of greatest prosperity were those eleven years when Thatcher was in office." ...
1
vote
2answers
233 views

Ellipsis in “can and have occurred”

The side effects can and have occurred. The omitted verb is an infinitive (occur) but the written verb is a past participle (occurred). Is this sentence grammatically correct and suitable for ...
10
votes
7answers
2k views

Is “to boil down” formal enough to be used in scientific writing? [closed]

The phrase to boil down to something can be found in most dictionaries. However, to me, it sounds colloquial to write Finding an exact solution to Eq. 1 boils down to ... A real-life ...
0
votes
4answers
425 views

Word for a person who is responsible for their job and doesn't neglect it

This is a topic for a TOEFL essay: What are some important qualities of a good supervisor (boss)? Now I'm looking for a word that best describes a supervisor that doesn't neglect their work, and ...
0
votes
2answers
389 views

What is the best time / are the best times for a meeting?

I'm about to arrange a meeting with a person. I have a feeling that when I say "What is the best time for a meeting?", I'm sort of forcing them to come up with one option only. I'd like to show them ...
1
vote
2answers
91 views

“(1) stop, (2) drop, (3) and roll” or “(1) stop, (2) drop, and (3) roll” [closed]

Which is correct, formally speaking, or is either acceptable based on style and consistency?
2
votes
1answer
308 views

Formal Version of “Getting Around”

I am writing an essay about The Catcher in the Rye, and need to mention Stradlater's ability to get with basically any girl he wants. It can be said that he "gets around" (sorry for lack of a better ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Alternatives to “intoxicates” in formal writing

In the following sentence: Stephano intoxicates Trinculo and Caliban. To me, the wording is awkward. I would like to find alternatives to intoxicates in formal writing, but I cannot discern what ...