The tag has no usage guidance.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

57
votes
20answers
10k views

What is the name of a small unluxurious restaurant?

Is there a name for this kind of restaurant? Searching Google, I can't find any synonym of restaurant. I've tried to search for images of unluxurious restaurant, small restaurant or mundane ...
40
votes
11answers
5k views

Is a hamburger considered a sandwich?

Today, a fellow user was given a CAPTCHA that looks like this: He wasn't sure how to solve the CAPTCHA, so he asked me: Are hamburgers considered sandwiches? Well, I couldn't figure it out, so ...
32
votes
8answers
5k views

Besides raisins, what other dried fruits and vegetables have their own names?

Dried grapes¹ have their own special word: "raisins". There are a few words for different types of dried meats ("jerky", "prosciutto", etc.). But other than "raisin", I can't think of any special ...
32
votes
4answers
3k views

Did the English call a fruit “openærs” for 700 years?

There is a small apple-tasting fruit called medlar in English. It looks like a cross between an apple and a rosehip. It has two main curious features: first the fruit must be bletted before it can ...
30
votes
8answers
6k views

Why is “toast” uncountable?

This is ‘English’ toast And this is some posh toast Pain Quotidien offers rye, walnut and sourdough toast at £2.95 for two slices, while Gail’s bakery chain, which opened its first café in ...
20
votes
5answers
2k views

How did “lobster” mean two different species?

This live crustacean is called astice in Italian. The one on the right is aragosta. They look very different from one another. The Italian dictionary describes the astice as having a deep (intense) ...
20
votes
6answers
8k views

Where does “pizza pie” originate?

The Italianissimo pizza—pronounced /ˈpiʦ:a/—is not always spelled or called pizza around the world: In Bosnia, Belarusian, Macedonia, Serbia it's spelled pica but pronounced /pîtsa/ In ...
17
votes
3answers
832 views

Origin of the name 'Knickerbocker Glory'?

A Knickerbocker Glory is a type of ice cream sundae, but I'm having trouble finding out where the name originates. Searching on the internet has given me several conflicting answers (e.g. it's named ...
15
votes
11answers
4k views

A verb for “picking small bits of food from the tray or the main plate before it is served or others have started eating”

I am looking for a verb that means to pick small portions of food usually stealthily before it is served for everyone especially from the main plate. I believe it can be the same verb used when people ...
12
votes
4answers
2k views

What word is used to describe a huge flank of bacon, before it is cut?

I used to think "rasher" implied a large portion of (possibly un-cut) bacon. I recently had my mind blown, when it turned out to really describe only a small portion - possibly even a single strip - ...
12
votes
3answers
6k views

What do you call someone who specialises in tea?

Someone who is qualified at wine is a sommelier and someone who is qualified at coffee is a barista. What do you call the equivalent of someone for tea? Also, I'm thinking there might be a word ...
10
votes
6answers
771 views

The etymology of “to prove dough”

prove [NO OBJECT] (Of bread dough) become aerated by the action of yeast; rise. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with clingfilm and leave to prove for about two hours in a warm ...
9
votes
7answers
1k views

Word for “food eaten only partially out of hunger”

Is there a word in English for a food eaten only partially out of hunger and largely for taste? Or perhaps for the act of eating for flavor rather than to satisfy hunger?
9
votes
3answers
37k views

Is there a version of brunch for a meal between dinner and lunch?

Brunch has become quite a common word in the English language. Is there a similar word for a meal in place of dinner and lunch? (A phrase will also do).
8
votes
2answers
10k views

Normans vs. Saxons: cow = beef, sheep = mutton, chicken =?

The story goes that after the Norman invasion of England, the words in English for prepared foods took on their French equivalents. The Saxon serfs bred the cows, sheep, and swine, which when served ...
8
votes
4answers
1k views

Etymology of “Spaghetti and gravy”

In Nero Wolfe "Before I die", the gangster's sidekick asks for spaghetti and gravy. After Wolfe's chef Fritz prepares him spaghetti with the type of gravy used for roast beef, it turns out that the ...
7
votes
9answers
5k views

Is there an English word meaning “snacks eaten as an accompaniment while drinking alcohol”?

I'm currently travelling in Korea and Japan and learned that both languages have words specifically for snacks that accompany alcoholic drinks, or at least go with beer and spirits such as sake or ...
6
votes
4answers
8k views

What's the correct term for potato chips?

In school I learned to say crisps but I don't want to mix it with french fries. So what's the correct term to use, and what synonyms are there?
6
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the word that sounds like “caromize” which means “cook a dish until we can reduce the juice in that dish to being viscous”?

OK, once I watched the Master Chef program and I heard people use a word that sounds like "caromize" to express the meaning of “cook a dish until the juices of the dish has reduced and is viscous”. ...
6
votes
4answers
5k views

When to use “the” before food names

I am new to the English language and I am going to English classes. In the middle of my book, we have a lesson about foods. In this lesson, food names are explained but I do not understand something. ...
6
votes
3answers
7k views

What is a word for food preferences?

What single word would you use to describe a list of food preferences, which includes: Allergies (e.g., shellfish) Sensitivities (e.g., lactose intolerance) Dislikes (e.g., Brussels sprouts) Likes ...
6
votes
3answers
8k views

Where do we get the word “peanut”?

Alternative names, like groundnut and earthnut, make sense. In German, peanuts are called Erdnüsse, literally, earth nuts. Where did the word "peanut" come from, and how did it become the dominant ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

How to correctly say you liked some food?

Yesterday a colleague gave me a piece of cake. We are both not native English speakers, but communicate in English. She wanted to ask me if I liked it and wrote: 'Did the cake taste you?' (1) ...
5
votes
1answer
123 views

Must cookies contain chocolate in BrE?

In British English, my friend informed me that my use of the word cookie was incorrect in referring to a baked item having no chocolate bits in it. Instead the appropriate term would have to be ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Where and what is the well those cheap drinks come from?

In the U.S. when someone orders a 'well drink' they are typically intending to order a drink (i.e. "vodka tonic, well") with the cheapest of the liquor the bar has available Where did the "well" ...
4
votes
4answers
476 views

‘pescatarian’: synonyms & etymology

Even if most Americans would take ‘pescatarian’ to be some odd Calvinist sect, according to Merriam-Webster it is a noun which means “one whose diet includes fish but no other meat” and its derivation ...
4
votes
2answers
337 views

Is it “dressing” if I cooked my “stuffing” outside of the turkey?

I've always cooked my Thanksgiving stuffing without actually putting it inside the turkey. Does it have to be stuffed into the turkey to be called stuffing?
4
votes
5answers
747 views

Do you “chew” yogurt? What is the correct verb?

Someone told me (half) jokingly that I should be able to eat my yogurt (plain Greek yogurt) quickly since I don't have to chew it. We then started wondering if chewing is the correct verb for when ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Why do The Sopranos leave off the last vowel in Italian words?

For example, they pronounce "ricotta" as "rih-gaht", "manicotti" as "mani-gaht", and "prosciutto" as "pro-shoot". I googled this, and according to this post from Chow.com, this is a common thing ...
4
votes
2answers
262 views

What Does “easy on the” Mean in Food Preparation?

If I walk into a restaurant and order a sandwich that comes with lettuce, and say "easy on the lettuce", would that mean that I wanted no lettuce at all, or simply less than normally comes with the ...
4
votes
3answers
145 views

How do you say that a food and a sauce 'harmonize'?

One time I told my friend that I ate a piece of bread with honey (not jam, real honey from the bottle) and my friend asked me if the honey is good with bread. Sometimes you say to two people ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Drink/eat off/from/in a cup/bowl/plate

Which combinations are you most likely to use? Do you drink from a cup? Eat something in a bowl? I got into an argument with a Welsh English speaker over this. He insisted that he drinks and eats ...
4
votes
1answer
261 views

How do I ask a waitress to “wrap the rest of the food up” to bring home?

I went to a restaurant for a meal and didn't manage to finish it, so there was some food leftover. How do you politely ask a server/waiter/waitress to wrap the food up? And is the expression "wrap ...
3
votes
2answers
839 views

Word to describe flavor of anise, licorice, and fennel?

Is there a word to describe the flavor common to anise, licorice, and fennel? It tastes kind of sweet, but has a "bite". Edit: here it is described as "licoricelike": ...
3
votes
2answers
215 views

Why is salt being referred to as “sodium”? [closed]

Why is salt referred to as "sodium" in nutrition facts (like on products) and similar documents in some parts of the world? Why is that nutrition facts labels in some parts of the world list salt ...
3
votes
1answer
531 views

Just once I'd like a PB & PB

Not sure if that has a special meaning but I heard it in a movie: Just once I’d like a PB & PB. What does it mean? Here is a cartoon:
3
votes
1answer
127 views

A verb that means making dimples in dough with fingertips

Is there a verb or baker's term which describes the act of pressing dough with your fingertips to make dimples? Is there a more succinct way of expressing this action? Is the term dimple the most ...
3
votes
1answer
395 views

Etymology: Dutch Curry [closed]

I've heard of Continental's Dutch Curry and Rice Soup; and I've seen it mentioned here and there... I'm soon to have it later tonight... But seriously, what makes a Dutch Curry... "Dutch"? It's not ...
3
votes
1answer
83 views

How does your orange peel?

Increasingly over the last few years, UK supermarkets and grocers have offered us things called 'Easy Peelers' (also easy-peelers, and in one case I've seen, easypeelers). It's a generic term that ...
2
votes
3answers
76 views

The state of an inedible food [closed]

If you leave the food for a long time out of refrigerator, something happens to the food and makes it smelly and inedible. What is that state of the food called in English?
2
votes
6answers
15k views

Words that describe food and eating [closed]

I'm writing a piece that relates to food and eating and am looking for adjectives that describe both. I just picked up the word prandial and that piqued my interest. Are there any similar words out ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Hypernym for “restaurant”, “cafe” and other food places

I am looking for a hypernym for all places that provide food, beverages, or both, of any quality or price — such as restaurant, cafe, fast-food and so on.
2
votes
6answers
2k views

Word or short expression to describe basic foods as a dish ingredients (like rice, potatoes or pasta)

Is there a word or a short expression to describe such basic foods like potatoes, pasta or rice in a context of dish ingredients? So you can say for example: "Broccoli isn't usually eaten as a ...
2
votes
3answers
885 views

A “Decadent” Cheesecake?

Is the adjective "decadent" suitable to be used in the context "a decadent cheesecake"?
2
votes
1answer
633 views

Trans Fat is italicized

Why is trans fat always italicized on food labels, so that it says trans fat? Is it just due to convention, or is there an actual reason (like for emphasis)?
2
votes
3answers
76 views

Where does one grow nuts?

Are they grown in an orchard, or a grove? Is there another, more nut-specific term? I ask out of pure curiosity.
2
votes
1answer
94 views

Jewish American word for stuffed cabbage

The word used by non-American and many American Jews for stuffed cabbage is 'holishkes'. There are a few variations. But I heard someone use a word that sounds like 'hole-up-tious'. I cheched ...
1
vote
2answers
240 views

Can you call a cheeseburger a hamburger? [closed]

Can you call a cheeseburger a hamburger? I am eating self-made ones.
1
vote
3answers
5k views

What is the difference between sauce and dressing? [closed]

What is the difference between sauce and dressing? Their purpose seems to be the same.
1
vote
2answers
56 views

Inanimate Objects that look good to eat

Is there a word for inanimate objects that look good to eat such as a cloud that looks like ice cream or cocking that looks like frosting?