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20
votes
7answers
8k views

Where does “pizza pie” originate?

The Italianissimo pizza—pronounced /ˈpiʦ:a/—is not always spelled or called pizza around the world: In Bosnia, Belarusian, Macedonia, Serbia it's spelled pica but pronounced /pîtsa/ In ...
40
votes
11answers
6k views

Is a hamburger considered a sandwich?

Today, a fellow user was given a CAPTCHA that looks like this: He wasn't sure how to solve the CAPTCHA, so he asked me: Are hamburgers considered sandwiches? Well, I couldn't figure it out, so ...
0
votes
3answers
492 views

Food Rhyme with No

So I've been looking into lots of different food to respond for a dance, and I was going to do something like using the food as trying to rhyme with "no" but it'll be a yes, don't get me wrong I'm not ...
58
votes
20answers
10k views

What is the name of a small unluxurious restaurant?

Is there a name for this kind of restaurant? Searching Google, I can't find any synonym of restaurant. I've tried to search for images of unluxurious restaurant, small restaurant or mundane ...
3
votes
2answers
217 views

Why is salt being referred to as “sodium”? [closed]

Why is salt referred to as "sodium" in nutrition facts (like on products) and similar documents in some parts of the world? Why is that nutrition facts labels in some parts of the world list salt ...
-1
votes
1answer
40 views

Fruit and nuts that come from a plant of a different name [closed]

Most fruit and nuts grow on a plant, bush, tree or palm of the same name. I can think of only two exceptions- grape (vine) and blackberry (bramble). Are there any others?
15
votes
11answers
4k views

A verb for “picking small bits of food from the tray or the main plate before it is served or others have started eating”

I am looking for a verb that means to pick small portions of food usually stealthily before it is served for everyone especially from the main plate. I believe it can be the same verb used when people ...
32
votes
8answers
5k views

Besides raisins, what other dried fruits and vegetables have their own names?

Dried grapes¹ have their own special word: "raisins". There are a few words for different types of dried meats ("jerky", "prosciutto", etc.). But other than "raisin", I can't think of any special ...
9
votes
7answers
1k views

Word for “food eaten only partially out of hunger”

Is there a word in English for a food eaten only partially out of hunger and largely for taste? Or perhaps for the act of eating for flavor rather than to satisfy hunger?
12
votes
3answers
6k views

What do you call someone who specialises in tea?

Someone who is qualified at wine is a sommelier and someone who is qualified at coffee is a barista. What do you call the equivalent of someone for tea? Also, I'm thinking there might be a word ...
20
votes
5answers
2k views

How did “lobster” mean two different species?

This live crustacean is called astice in Italian. The one on the right is aragosta. They look very different from one another. The Italian dictionary describes the astice as having a deep (intense) ...
4
votes
4answers
496 views

‘pescatarian’: synonyms & etymology

Even if most Americans would take ‘pescatarian’ to be some odd Calvinist sect, according to Merriam-Webster it is a noun which means “one whose diet includes fish but no other meat” and its derivation ...
30
votes
8answers
6k views

Why is “toast” uncountable?

This is ‘English’ toast And this is some posh toast Pain Quotidien offers rye, walnut and sourdough toast at £2.95 for two slices, while Gail’s bakery chain, which opened its first café in ...
1
vote
1answer
194 views

Word for a someone who likes food or likes to eat. [duplicate]

Not necessarily greedy but someone who can't say no to food or easily attracted to food. Not to excess, not selfish either. In someway like a curious child who keeps eyeing your food or a child who ...
17
votes
3answers
977 views

Origin of the name 'Knickerbocker Glory'?

A Knickerbocker Glory is a type of ice cream sundae, but I'm having trouble finding out where the name originates. Searching on the internet has given me several conflicting answers (e.g. it's named ...
0
votes
3answers
84 views

When an anthropomorphized animal eats/is eaten by a human, is there a word similar to *cannibalism* that applies?

Occasionally, I find myself writing about stories (especially children's stories) where there is a theme of eating characters. For example, Little Red Riding Hood is eaten by the Wolf, and Peter ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Is there a word for when a food is named after or shares the name of a place? [duplicate]

There are many examples of this thing, with a range of different variations. For some differently flavoured examples: Frankfurt(er) / Berliner / Hamburger Frenchfries / Irish Stew / Scotch Egg ...
0
votes
3answers
130 views

Stop chewing! What is it called when someone doesn't like the sound of other people eating?

My brother hates the sound of eating, chewing, slurping, swallowing etc. I am looking for either: The name of the condition or A word to describe the type of person who behaves like this
4
votes
1answer
323 views

How do I ask a waitress to “wrap the rest of the food up” to bring home?

I went to a restaurant for a meal and didn't manage to finish it, so there was some food leftover. How do you politely ask a server/waiter/waitress to wrap the food up? And is the expression "wrap ...
-3
votes
2answers
135 views

How unusual is toast? [closed]

Is there any food, other than 'toast' (i.e. slices of bread browned by fire, electric heat, etc.) that, even when it is in domestic-sized, countable amounts is nevertheless treated as an uncountable, ...
1
vote
2answers
57 views

Inanimate Objects that look good to eat

Is there a word for inanimate objects that look good to eat such as a cloud that looks like ice cream or cocking that looks like frosting?
2
votes
3answers
77 views

Where does one grow nuts?

Are they grown in an orchard, or a grove? Is there another, more nut-specific term? I ask out of pure curiosity.
10
votes
6answers
816 views

The etymology of “to prove dough”

prove [NO OBJECT] (Of bread dough) become aerated by the action of yeast; rise. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with clingfilm and leave to prove for about two hours in a warm ...
7
votes
9answers
5k views

Is there an English word meaning “snacks eaten as an accompaniment while drinking alcohol”?

I'm currently travelling in Korea and Japan and learned that both languages have words specifically for snacks that accompany alcoholic drinks, or at least go with beer and spirits such as sake or ...
3
votes
1answer
85 views

How does your orange peel?

Increasingly over the last few years, UK supermarkets and grocers have offered us things called 'Easy Peelers' (also easy-peelers, and in one case I've seen, easypeelers). It's a generic term that ...
32
votes
4answers
3k views

Did the English call a fruit “openærs” for 700 years?

There is a small apple-tasting fruit called medlar in English. It looks like a cross between an apple and a rosehip. It has two main curious features: first the fruit must be bletted before it can ...
0
votes
1answer
553 views

Is there a link between margarita cocktail and margherita pizza? [closed]

They sound the same, but is there any link between margarita cocktail and margherita pizza?
-1
votes
2answers
113 views

Are countable nouns always in plural in recipes' names?

I have the following ingredients in a recipe: 40 g oat flakes 150 ml milk (1.5% milkfat) 4 g butter ½ apple, grated I need to know if I should name the recipe Oat Flakes ...
1
vote
4answers
99 views

Expressing the fat content of food

Can I write "0.5% milk" or "27% cream cheese" to indicate the fat content? Edit: just to make things clearer - it will be used in the list of ingredients of a recipe Edit 2: here's a picture of ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

What would you call the “neutral” variety in a range of food products?

Imagine you are naming a range of packaged, vegan, meat-like pan-fry kebab products that come with different marinades. There's a Curry, a Döner Kebab, and a Gyro. The final product of the range ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the word that sounds like “caromize” which means “cook a dish until we can reduce the juice in that dish to being viscous”?

OK, once I watched the Master Chef program and I heard people use a word that sounds like "caromize" to express the meaning of “cook a dish until the juices of the dish has reduced and is viscous”. ...
3
votes
1answer
133 views

A verb that means making dimples in dough with fingertips

Is there a verb or baker's term which describes the act of pressing dough with your fingertips to make dimples? Is there a more succinct way of expressing this action? Is the term dimple the most ...
8
votes
4answers
1k views

Etymology of “Spaghetti and gravy”

In Nero Wolfe "Before I die", the gangster's sidekick asks for spaghetti and gravy. After Wolfe's chef Fritz prepares him spaghetti with the type of gravy used for roast beef, it turns out that the ...
2
votes
3answers
77 views

The state of an inedible food [closed]

If you leave the food for a long time out of refrigerator, something happens to the food and makes it smelly and inedible. What is that state of the food called in English?
3
votes
2answers
927 views

Word to describe flavor of anise, licorice, and fennel?

Is there a word to describe the flavor common to anise, licorice, and fennel? It tastes kind of sweet, but has a "bite". Edit: here it is described as "licoricelike": ...
1
vote
2answers
159 views

What is the name of a group of foods that are not cuisine, cooking technique or ingredient specific?

What would the name for a list of foods that are not specific to cuisine, cooking technique or ingredient? This is a question about how to precisely categorize foods using plain English. A curry is ...
6
votes
3answers
8k views

What is a word for food preferences?

What single word would you use to describe a list of food preferences, which includes: Allergies (e.g., shellfish) Sensitivities (e.g., lactose intolerance) Dislikes (e.g., Brussels sprouts) Likes ...
12
votes
4answers
2k views

What word is used to describe a huge flank of bacon, before it is cut?

I used to think "rasher" implied a large portion of (possibly un-cut) bacon. I recently had my mind blown, when it turned out to really describe only a small portion - possibly even a single strip - ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

“Dish of the day“ vs “today's special”

Many restaurants offer a menu which doesn't change from day to day, and in addition offer one choice which varies from day to day, perhaps depending on which ingredients are available. This choice can ...
4
votes
3answers
145 views

How do you say that a food and a sauce 'harmonize'?

One time I told my friend that I ate a piece of bread with honey (not jam, real honey from the bottle) and my friend asked me if the honey is good with bread. Sometimes you say to two people ...
0
votes
2answers
454 views

Word for eating things that aren't food

Is there a word for trying to eat things that aren't food? I'm thinking particularly in the context of babies, where it's a normal part of the learning process, but I dare say it is a disorder that ...
3
votes
1answer
444 views

Etymology: Dutch Curry [closed]

I've heard of Continental's Dutch Curry and Rice Soup; and I've seen it mentioned here and there... I'm soon to have it later tonight... But seriously, what makes a Dutch Curry... "Dutch"? It's not ...
4
votes
5answers
783 views

Do you “chew” yogurt? What is the correct verb?

Someone told me (half) jokingly that I should be able to eat my yogurt (plain Greek yogurt) quickly since I don't have to chew it. We then started wondering if chewing is the correct verb for when ...
2
votes
1answer
652 views

Trans Fat is italicized

Why is trans fat always italicized on food labels, so that it says trans fat? Is it just due to convention, or is there an actual reason (like for emphasis)?
5
votes
4answers
2k views

How to correctly say you liked some food?

Yesterday a colleague gave me a piece of cake. We are both not native English speakers, but communicate in English. She wanted to ask me if I liked it and wrote: 'Did the cake taste you?' (1) ...
6
votes
3answers
9k views

Where do we get the word “peanut”?

Alternative names, like groundnut and earthnut, make sense. In German, peanuts are called Erdnüsse, literally, earth nuts. Where did the word "peanut" come from, and how did it become the dominant ...
4
votes
2answers
275 views

What Does “easy on the” Mean in Food Preparation?

If I walk into a restaurant and order a sandwich that comes with lettuce, and say "easy on the lettuce", would that mean that I wanted no lettuce at all, or simply less than normally comes with the ...
2
votes
6answers
15k views

Words that describe food and eating [closed]

I'm writing a piece that relates to food and eating and am looking for adjectives that describe both. I just picked up the word prandial and that piqued my interest. Are there any similar words out ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Why do The Sopranos leave off the last vowel in Italian words?

For example, they pronounce "ricotta" as "rih-gaht", "manicotti" as "mani-gaht", and "prosciutto" as "pro-shoot". I googled this, and according to this post from Chow.com, this is a common thing ...
5
votes
1answer
123 views

Must cookies contain chocolate in BrE?

In British English, my friend informed me that my use of the word cookie was incorrect in referring to a baked item having no chocolate bits in it. Instead the appropriate term would have to be ...