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4
votes
5answers
200 views

Do you “chew” yogurt? What is the correct verb?

Someone told me (half) jokingly that I should be able to eat my yogurt (plain Greek yogurt) quickly since I don't have to chew it. We then started wondering if chewing is the correct verb for when ...
6
votes
3answers
238 views

What do you call someone who specialises in tea?

Someone who is qualified at wine is a sommelier and someone who is qualified at coffee is a barista. What do you call the equivalent of someone for tea? Also, I'm thinking there might be a word ...
3
votes
2answers
55 views

What Does “easy on the” Mean in Food Preparation?

If I walk into a restaurant and order a sandwich that comes with lettuce, and say "easy on the lettuce", would that mean that I wanted no lettuce at all, or simply less than normally comes with the ...
0
votes
2answers
177 views

“Dish of the day“ vs “today's special”

Many restaurants offer a menu which doesn't change from day to day, and in addition offer one choice which varies from day to day, perhaps depending on which ingredients are available. This choice can ...
4
votes
1answer
368 views

Why do The Sopranos leave off the last vowel in Italian words?

For example, they pronounce "ricotta" as "rih-gaht", "manicotti" as "mani-gaht", and "prosciutto" as "pro-shoot". I googled this, and according to this post from Chow.com, this is a common thing ...
2
votes
1answer
170 views

Trans Fat is italicized

Why is trans fat always italicized on food labels, so that it says trans fat? Is it just due to convention, or is there an actual reason (like for emphasis)?
4
votes
1answer
80 views

Must cookies contain chocolate in BrE?

In British English, my friend informed me that my use of the word cookie was incorrect in referring to a baked item having no chocolate bits in it. Instead the appropriate term would have to be ...
0
votes
3answers
159 views

Food Rhyme with No

So I've been looking into lots of different food to respond for a dance, and I was going to do something like using the food as trying to rhyme with "no" but it'll be a yes, don't get me wrong I'm not ...
2
votes
6answers
7k views

Words that describe food and eating [closed]

I'm writing a piece that relates to food and eating and am looking for adjectives that describe both. I just picked up the word prandial and that piqued my interest. Are there any similar words out ...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

Jewish American word for stuffed cabbage

The word used by non-American and many American Jews for stuffed cabbage is 'holishkes'. There are a few variations. But I heard someone use a word that sounds like 'hole-up-tious'. I cheched ...
3
votes
1answer
367 views

Just once I'd like a PB & PB

Not sure if that has a special meaning but I heard it in a movie: Just once I’d like a PB & PB. What does it mean? Here is a cartoon:
-1
votes
2answers
15k views

What is the opposite of fresh? [closed]

In regards to food, fresh is used in a number of different ways. It can mean not stale, as in fresh bread, but it is also used in regards to meat, vegetables, or fruit. People talk about having fresh ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Correct order and terminology for meals in the day [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Lunch vs. dinner vs. supper — times and meanings? I know there are copious amounts of debates on this matter but is there actually one definitive answer for the order of ...
4
votes
2answers
100 views

How do you say that a food and a sauce 'harmonize'?

One time I told my friend that I ate a piece of bread with honey (not jam, real honey from the bottle) and my friend asked me if the honey is good with bread. Sometimes you say to two people ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Hypernym for “restaurant”, “cafe” and other food places

I am looking for a hypernym for all places that provide food, beverages, or both, of any quality or price — such as restaurant, cafe, fast-food and so on.
7
votes
2answers
4k views

Normans vs. Saxons: cow = beef, sheep = mutton, chicken =?

The story goes that after the Norman invasion of England, the words in English for prepared foods took on their French equivalents. The Saxon serfs bred the cows, sheep, and swine, which when served ...
6
votes
3answers
3k views

What is a word for food preferences?

What single word would you use to describe a list of food preferences, which includes: Allergies (e.g., shellfish) Sensitivities (e.g., lactose intolerant) Dislikes (e.g., Brussels sprouts) Likes ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Where can I find a list of synonyms and hyponyms for different food types? [closed]

I'm trying to find a list of synonyms between various food types for a programming project I am working on with searching English language phrases. I was originally going to ask this on Stack ...
1
vote
2answers
212 views

Can you call a cheeseburger a hamburger? [closed]

Can you call a cheeseburger a hamburger? I am eating self-made ones.
1
vote
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between sauce and dressing? [closed]

What is the difference between sauce and dressing? Their purpose seems to be the same.
2
votes
6answers
982 views

Word or short expression to describe basic foods as a dish ingredients (like rice, potatoes or pasta)

Is there a word or a short expression to describe such basic foods like potatoes, pasta or rice in a context of dish ingredients? So you can say for example: "Broccoli isn't usually eaten as a ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

When to use “the” before food names

I am new to the English language and I am going to English classes. In the middle of my book, we have a lesson about foods. In this lesson, food names are explained but I do not understand something. ...
6
votes
4answers
3k views

What's the correct term for potato chips?

In school I learned to say crisps but I don't want to mix it with french fries. So what's the correct term to use, and what synonyms are there?
3
votes
2answers
976 views

Drink/eat off/from/in a cup/bowl/plate

Which combinations are you most likely to use? Do you drink from a cup? Eat something in a bowl? I got into an argument with a Welsh English speaker over this. He insisted that he drinks and eats ...
5
votes
1answer
771 views

Where and what is the well those cheap drinks come from?

In the U.S. when someone orders a 'well drink' they are typically intending to order a drink (i.e. "vodka tonic, well") with the cheapest of the liquor the bar has available Where did the "well" ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

How to correctly say you liked some food?

Yesterday a colleague gave me a piece of cake. We are both not native English speakers, but communicate in English. She wanted to ask me if I liked it and wrote: 'Did the cake taste you?' (1) ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

Where do we get the word “peanut”?

Alternative names, like groundnut and earthnut, make sense. In German, peanuts are called Erdnüsse, literally, earth nuts. Where did the word "peanut" come from, and how did it become the dominant ...
7
votes
9answers
3k views

Is there an English word meaning “snacks eaten as an accompaniment while drinking alcohol”?

I'm currently travelling in Korea and Japan and learned that both languages have words specifically for snacks that accompany alcoholic drinks, or at least go with beer and spirits such as sake or ...
2
votes
3answers
571 views

A “Decadent” Cheesecake?

Is the adjective "decadent" suitable to be used in the context "a decadent cheesecake"?
7
votes
3answers
21k views

Is there a version of brunch for a meal between dinner and lunch?

Brunch has become quite a common word in the English language. Is there a similar word for a meal in place of dinner and lunch? (A phrase will also do).
4
votes
2answers
263 views

Is it “dressing” if I cooked my “stuffing” outside of the turkey?

I've always cooked my Thanksgiving stuffing without actually putting it inside the turkey. Does it have to be stuffed into the turkey to be called stuffing?