Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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What is the word for object that take lots of time to prepare, and then you can only use them for a very little time? (like Drones)

What is the word for things that take lots of time to prepare (or charge) and then you are able to use them for a short time until you have to prepare (or charge) them again? For example, Drones take ...
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41 views

“These kids I tell you” or “kids I tell you” expression meaning

I have read them in few disconnected articles and in conversations but could not understand them completely. "These kids I tell you" or "kids I tell you" expression meaning. What do they mean ?
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21 views

How would you call this kind of listing?

There are traditional classifieds where a real estate can be characterized this way: 2-bedroom apartment for rent in Leicester with an area of XX sq ft ... but the same can also be displayed ...
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27 views

“Tested Recently” or “Recently Tested”?

Is there one term that is clearly better than the other? Here is the use case: I have a computer system which shows when certain machines have been tested. The possible values are "Ready For Test", ...
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20 views

“effective and efficient estimation” or “accurate and efficient estimation”?

In math, we always need to derive some methods and strategies to estimate an unknown thing. For a good method, first it should get an estimation that is as accurate as possible, and second it should ...
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46 views

Phrase Synonymous to “Stop at nothing?”

I'm writing a paper describing a fashion designer who creates incredibly complex and EXTRAVAGANT sets for his runway shows. I want to say he "stops at nothing" or "spares no effort" or "leaves no ...
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47 views

Came “into” fruition?

My friend wrote some copy, explaining that her "company came into fruition because she realized the opportunity..." I've never used "came into fruition" -- only "came to fruition". Is "came into ...
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39 views

How to reformulate 'honor the data'

I have written sentence like this The resulting property models from cooperative inversion honor the geophysical data My Professor wants me to reformulate the sentence, in particular he raised a ...
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75 views

What is the meaning when someone say “it doesn't get much weird than Lynda?”

Lynda made a dance performance, it's very weird and many audiences couldn't understand it. Then a guy made a comment "It doesn't get much weird than Lynda?". What does he mean ? Is that "Lynda is ...
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105 views

A word for saying exactly what you meant/wanted to

It seems to me that I've heard it before but it escapes me.. If I remember correctly the definition is relating to 'saying exactly the right thing at the right time' 'saying exactly what you meant ...
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110 views

"it's a long time that.'

This question was posted here "It's a long time that" - correct or not? a few months back and an answer was selected. The answer given is hardly satisfying, and I feel that the question ...
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104 views

A word or term for extrapolation fallacy or using results beyond their context? [Solved]

I am looking for a word or term that means something like: you are using previous results outside boundaries of the original experiment/observation earlier experience/results does not apply in all ...
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20 views

what is the way of ending formal mails?

what are the ways in which we can end formal mails and also let me know what kind of beginnings are appropriate for formal mails? I generally mention : Opening:Dear Sir/Madam Closing: Thanks and ...
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18 views

Correctness of “enough as” constructions

I'm not a native speaker. Sometimes, I feel like using expressions like There are lots of candidates. You should be qualified enough as to excel in the preliminary exam if you want to get in the ...
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36 views

Can anybody tell me what “the stake” in this question means?

I'm doing an assignment for my English class, and I don't understand what my instructor is asking. What are the stakes of the various objections to teaching Fun Home (promotion of a lifestyle, ...
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18 views

is “subject to change” vs. “subject to be changed” vs. “subject to being changed”

From other threads I found out the something is subject to change expression is correct and is in common use. But I also googled "subject to be changed" phrase and found a lot of mentions. For ...
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20 views

“… he emerged on to the landing …” , what does this mean?

While reading through the Guardian, I bumped into this sentence which I think its first part may have another meaning rather than what it's literal meaning implies. "When he emerged on to the ...
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19 views

How to ask for the current token number of the person being served by customercare

In places like banks or other customer care centers, tokens are issued to people and based on the token number, one is served by customer care. At some places, there are automatic displays displaying ...
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28 views

Are “rent per day” and “rent per month” correct expressions?

Do determine the type of a suggestion in a real estate catalogue, besides "for sale", we must also denote real estate suggested to be rented on daily basis and on monthly basis. Is "per day" correct? ...
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21 views

Correct Phrase Between “The Art of Fighting” and “The Arts of Fighting”

Are "The Art of Fighting" and "The Arts of Fighting" both correct? If not, which one is accurate?
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58 views

What does this expression mean: Don't let him consign me to the rafters

Some once told me about someone else: "please don't let him consign me to the rafters, because he is one of those irrevocable keepsakes"
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33 views

Meaning of government-run in paragraph?

Could anyone guide me the meaning of government-run in below paragraph? Until the late 1980s, cannabis and opium were legal in India, sold in government-run shops and traded by the British East ...
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35 views

A word or phrase meaning “a question that calls for another questions that calls…”

I am looking for a word or phrase which I could to mean "a question that calls for another questions that calls another question and so on". What I want to say is a bit like a snowball effect but ...
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35 views

`average' for specific time duration

I'd like to represent the average performance of some technical method in a table. The performances were measured every hour from 2PM to 11PM. In my report, the average of those measurements will be ...
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25 views

“The next thing we know” usage in warnings

I'm aware of that phrase "The next thing I(we) know" could be used to describe "blank periods in memory" or something that happends out of a sudden, for example: We all heard this weird noise, ...
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94 views

Is the phrase “out of home” meaning “not at home” correct?

I've run across this phrase "someone is out of home most of the day" meaning "they are not home most of the day" several times. Is it correct and common way of saying "I'm not home often"? Example: ...
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29 views

Australian English for items that are discounted, on sale, or on clearance?

US English user looking for help with AusE. How would you describe to a friend something you bought that was on sale, discounted, or on clearance? Would it be with those terms, or variations on those ...
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61 views

“in a * perspective” or “from a * perspective”

Which is correct: "in a * perspective" or "from a * perspective"? So for example "Growing cucumber in a mathematical perspective" or "Growing cucumber from a mathematical perspective". Thanks, ...
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19 views

Term for a storyline that splits in two

Is there a term for a storyline that splits into two points of view? For example, two characters who travel together split paths and plot unfolds in two different timelines. It can probably be applied ...
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41 views

Which is better, no good at sports or not good at sports?

Which of the following sounds more natural to native ears? 1. I'm not good at sports. 2. I'm no good at sports. Is there any difference in the meaning?
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17 views

Noun clause for complement

I'd like to say following facts as short as possible. We conducted a experiment. The purpose of the experiment is testing a hypothesis The hypothesis is that all of beatle in this island is black ...
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54 views

“The last of the late brakers”

This is a common phrase in motorsports, particularly with motorcycles. Carrying speed for as long as possible, and braking as late and hard as possible into a turn, is advantages to lower overall ...
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49 views

A word to describe interest in a process related to a certain situation but not in the situation itself

The word to describe a person's interest in a process related to a certain situation but does not necessarily convey their interest in the situation itself. To provide context: Over the last 4 years ...
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54 views

“Should it go through the formality of actually happening …”

When did phrases such as go through the formality of taking place and its logical equivalents (such as going through or experiencing the formality of actually happening or existing or ...
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39 views

what do you call a visit to someone who has just beat an illness?

If I was visiting someone to wish well on them and thank God for their soundness and them overriding ailment and illness, what do you call that sort of visit? Let's go to Mark and ...... It's not ...
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317 views

“In the Last Decades” = “Over Recent Decades”?

Example: This trend has been affected by significant changes in the last decades / over recent decades. I've always believed that "in the last decades" should be followed by "of" and a period of ...
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48 views

What's a word similar to the adj. form of “elect” but for a position that was held previously?

I'm working on my CV and I'm trying to describe an elected position I held with a title. "Treasurer Elect" does not fit since I was appointed to the position in the past. "Elected Treasurer" also ...
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63 views

appropriate phrase for expressing close distances toward a person

Imagine this scenario: You are having a conversation with someone about a tropical fruit which you have seen the picture of it(on the internet or something) and you do know the name of it, but you ...
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45 views

Cracking your head to find OR Cracking your head over?

Which is the right way to say it? Got caught in a disagreement over this blog title. Example usage: Cracking your head to find the perfect Christmas gifts? Vs Cracking your head over the ...
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27 views

Meaning of expression: “at the main”

I've stumbled upon this phrase in The Code of the Woosters by P. G. Wodehouse: And the next moment my fizziness was turned off at the main by the sight of a pile of telegrams on the table. I ...
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22 views

how to know when the independent clause starts

my question is about the usage of the independent clause, and it is also about how to know when the dependent clause starts. Also, in the below given sentence, is the comma used before now correct or ...
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48 views

Calling this kind of situation of defeat

I am looking for a phrase to describe a situation where two people are arguing and only one of them is good with words (Let's call him 'A') and the one with limited speaking skills (let's call him ...
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73 views

Pretty specific, but is “with your plate in your lap” a common expression in English?

In Dutch we use it to refer to (the airtime of) tv-shows that start around dinner. Is there an equivalent to it? I suppose it's sort of an idiom, but probably too specific to be considered so.
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248 views

How to use “have an impact”?

I was wondering whether saying "have an impact" instead of "have an impact on" is idiomatically correct. "He aspired to have an impact through education and hard work."
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36 views

“communicative support” or “communicative media” or …?

How would you say if you are working (at the same time) on a book, a video documentary, website and periodical publication. I'm looking for a short term that would summarize this activity. what ...
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31 views

What's a word that means or historic character who sybolizes a spy whose own lack of knowledge reveals his subterfuge?

The context is a spy who becomes revealed to the person who is spied upon because the spy lacks knowledge of the target's (the spied upon's) specialty work
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30 views

Armor glistening like glass in Chapman's Homer

I am trying to recover a lovely phrase that I only dimly remember. I think that it's in Chapman's Homer. I think that it's a simile: someone's armor or shield (perhaps Agamemnon's) "glistens like ...
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“to keep priorities” - must add “straight” or equivalent?

Does it make sense to say "a person must keep priorities", or must I add "straight/ intact/ in line" or anything else after "priorities"? Thanks! edited - I would still like to know if the above ...
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Is it acceptable to say “He is the best lawyer, bar none” and add “no pun intended”

I would like to know if it is OK to say "He is a topnotch lawyer, bar none - no pun intended" as part of my review to my lawyer.
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96 views

What is this mother doing?

I would write a dialogue piece between a mother and a son who are having a heated argument over something. The son is very angry at his mother because he is suffering from disease and frustrated with ...