Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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What is the difference between “look into” and “look at” when used in figurative meaning?

Thank you for sending me the introduction of your company. We will "look into"/"look at" it later. What is the difference between "look into" and "look at" when used with a figurative meaning ...
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what do we call “easy readable books”?

I just wonder if there exists a special expression in English to call "easy readable books", like simple short stories or pocket books?
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79 views

"it's a long time that.'

This question was posted here "It's a long time that" - correct or not? a few months back and an answer was selected. The answer given is hardly satisfying, and I feel that the question ...
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96 views

A word or term for extrapolation fallacy or using results beyond their context? [Solved]

I am looking for a word or term that means something like: you are using previous results outside boundaries of the original experiment/observation earlier experience/results does not apply in all ...
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Noun clause for complement

I'd like to say following facts as short as possible. We conducted a experiment. The purpose of the experiment is testing a hypothesis The hypothesis is that all of beatle in this island is black ...
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30 views

“The last of the late brakers”

This is a common phrase in motorsports, particularly with motorcycles. Carrying speed for as long as possible, and braking as late and hard as possible into a turn, is advantages to lower overall ...
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25 views

A word to describe interest in a process related to a certain situation but not in the situation itself

The word to describe a person's interest in a process related to a certain situation but does not necessarily convey their interest in the situation itself. To provide context: Over the last 4 years ...
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38 views

“Should it go through the formality of actually happening …”

When did phrases such as go through the formality of taking place and its logical equivalents (such as going through or experiencing the formality of actually happening or existing or ...
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29 views

what do you call a visit to someone who has just beat an illness?

If I was visiting someone to wish well on them and thank God for their soundness and them overriding ailment and illness, what do you call that sort of visit? Let's go to Mark and ...... It's not ...
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“In the Last Decades” = “Over Recent Decades”?

Example: This trend has been affected by significant changes in the last decades / over recent decades. I've always believed that "in the last decades" should be followed by "of" and a period of ...
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43 views

What's a word similar to the adj. form of “elect” but for a position that was held previously?

I'm working on my CV and I'm trying to describe an elected position I held with a title. "Treasurer Elect" does not fit since I was appointed to the position in the past. "Elected Treasurer" also ...
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44 views

appropriate phrase for expressing close distances toward a person

Imagine this scenario: You are having a conversation with someone about a tropical fruit which you have seen the picture of it(on the internet or something) and you do know the name of it, but you ...
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33 views

Cracking your head to find OR Cracking your head over?

Which is the right way to say it? Got caught in a disagreement over this blog title. Example usage: Cracking your head to find the perfect Christmas gifts? Vs Cracking your head over the ...
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Meaning of expression: “at the main”

I've stumbled upon this phrase in The Code of the Woosters by P. G. Wodehouse: And the next moment my fizziness was turned off at the main by the sight of a pile of telegrams on the table. I ...
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16 views

how to know when the independent clause starts

my question is about the usage of the independent clause, and it is also about how to know when the dependent clause starts. Also, in the below given sentence, is the comma used before now correct or ...
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38 views

Calling this kind of situation of defeat

I am looking for a phrase to describe a situation where two people are arguing and only one of them is good with words (Let's call him 'A') and the one with limited speaking skills (let's call him ...
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66 views

Pretty specific, but is “with your plate in your lap” a common expression in English?

In Dutch we use it to refer to (the airtime of) tv-shows that start around dinner. Is there an equivalent to it? I suppose it's sort of an idiom, but probably too specific to be considered so.
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107 views

How to use “have an impact”?

I was wondering whether saying "have an impact" instead of "have an impact on" is idiomatically correct. "He aspired to have an impact through education and hard work."
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“communicative support” or “communicative media” or …?

How would you say if you are working (at the same time) on a book, a video documentary, website and periodical publication. I'm looking for a short term that would summarize this activity. what ...
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What's a word that means or historic character who sybolizes a spy whose own lack of knowledge reveals his subterfuge?

The context is a spy who becomes revealed to the person who is spied upon because the spy lacks knowledge of the target's (the spied upon's) specialty work
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28 views

Armor glistening like glass in Chapman's Homer

I am trying to recover a lovely phrase that I only dimly remember. I think that it's in Chapman's Homer. I think that it's a simile: someone's armor or shield (perhaps Agamemnon's) "glistens like ...
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“to keep priorities” - must add “straight” or equivalent?

Does it make sense to say "a person must keep priorities", or must I add "straight/ intact/ in line" or anything else after "priorities"? Thanks! edited - I would still like to know if the above ...
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74 views

Is it acceptable to say “He is the best lawyer, bar none” and add “no pun intended”

I would like to know if it is OK to say "He is a topnotch lawyer, bar none - no pun intended" as part of my review to my lawyer.
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What is this mother doing?

I would write a dialogue piece between a mother and a son who are having a heated argument over something. The son is very angry at his mother because he is suffering from disease and frustrated with ...
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53 views

What is the name of the word of the feeling of almost getting hit by something? like a near miss but emotionally?

I am writing a personal narritave for my freshman writing class and I just cant come up with the word that fits at the end of this. "Then out of the blue comes a curveball, something so unexpected ...
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What is Character B doing to Character A?

Character C was unfortunate to get infected with West Nile virus and now has wide rashes all over her body and has turned into an ugly looking woman(she was really hot before) and now faces the ...
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47 views

Phrase or word for concept of incorporation of individual preferences into single final product

What phrase or word suggestions come to mind for the concept of selecting a group of individual preferences to be incorporated into the production of a single finished product? For instance, when ...
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54 views

Time-Taken; Taken Time; Used Time

I have created a tool/database for the measurement of the time which is used to complete a specific process/workflow in my company. One of the columns shows the time the workflow used to be ...
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Scottish(?) sayings: 'For any sake' and 'Not for any favour'

Are 'For any sake' and 'Not for any favour' just confined to Scotland? I have never heard them said in England.
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152 views

Topic sentence and controlling idea

English speakers relaxing at home,for example,may put on kimonos,which is a Japanese word.English speakers who live in a warm climate may take an afternoon siesta on an outdoor patio without realizing ...
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46 views

How to express “I'm at company”?

I know "I'm at home" and "I'm at school" are both native expresstions. However, I googled "I'm at company" and just get about 16,700 results, which means it's not a common expression. How will a ...
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51 views

What is it driven by? VS what is it motivated by?

Assuming those two are same meaning for me, but I would like to know how people pick a word among many thesaurus? Of course, it is depends on context but when you make a simple question like this. I ...
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325 views

Question about the use of “in this spirit” expression

Is the use of "In this spirit" correct in the following context? Marcel Proust wrote ``Let us be grateful to the people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom". ...
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117 views

What word/phrase describes replacing an example of something with a description of it?

I am trying to explain this situation. Someone has written an example of a behavior: "When Joe goes to the grocery store he should see that it is closed". I replace this with a description of that ...
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61 views

Another way to say “Condolence”

I'm looking for words/phrases that can substitute the use of word "condolence" during a funeral. I'm searching for another alternative to avoid repetition of such expression in the grieving party, in ...
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146 views

On the referent of 'during that time' / 'meanwhile'

Can during that time refer to a relatively long time? Or can during that time be used regardless of whether the span is long or short? For example, I think (1) is ok: (1) I waited for a bus for 10 ...
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106 views

Correct way to ask something

I'd like to know if 'How are you and your family?' and 'How are you and yours?' are both right?
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“dollar rebounds biggest falls”

I found the sentence like the following: Dollar rebounds biggest falls Does this sentence make any sense? I guess it should instead be: Dollar rebounds after its biggest falls
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63 views

bleed inside out/got-have got

I've been wondering if there is the expression "I bleed inside out" or if it is correct. For example "someone or something makes me bleed inside out" - as we say "it breaks my heart". And actually I ...
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What does “powerhouse” mean in ”dessert powerhouse” in a food-industry context?

I read an article where the writer uses the term dessert powerhouse. I guess dessert powerhouse must be like a big manufacture that makes a lot of desserts and wholesales them to smaller cake-shops or ...
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“It's like with” as replacement of “I'm in the same situation as…”

Is this a valid replacement? Example: Speaker A: I'm planning to quit. Speaker B: Why? Speaker A: It's like with Mrs. Anderson. I'm tired of not making any progress. (Speaker A is ...
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33 views

What is the similar expression of “the young go-getters” in BE?

Could anyone help me? If I am asking the UK expression that is similar with this US colloquialism “the young go getters”, would I learn something from you?
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Is “Interpose Model” the correct term

I have a question in context of electrical engineering. Imagine a schematic of electrical components or a netlist, where I want to change the behavior of one part by cutting the wiring and adding a ...
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48 views

Is this an acceptable way of claiming emphasis?

I proposed this edit to a Stack Exchange answer. Because there were three rather lengthy block quotes, I thought bolding the most relevant sentences would be helpful to readers, especially if they ...
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84 views

Can the adjective “sexist” be replaced by “chauvinistic” in this context?

Can chauvinistic denote the same meaning as sexist in this sentence? The nature of these rituals generates a sexist mentality among the new members.
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“This isn't the place for you” meaning?

Would you say that this line is an indirect way of telling someone they shouldn't come/be somewhere? Or if not indirect, maybe some other adjective?
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271 views

Meaning of “fact of nature” in a paragraph

A friend of mine is translating a text about the Millennial Generation and asked me about the meaning of "fact of nature" in the excerpt "technology wasn't a fact of nature at these times". It is part ...
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“On the one after,” vs “on the one that followed.”

Which one is more common, more idiomatic? Example: My brother's exams would end next week, so we decided to take the trip on the one after. My brother's exams would end next week, so we ...
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Two questions - present progressive

I know that saying "I just saw her" is correct, but people also say "I've just arrived", so saying "I've just seen her" is also correct? Maybe it's a UK/US difference ? If it's correct, then "Just" ...
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Way to indicate coordinates

Do the following two sentences mean the same thing? Upper left Y coordinate relative to the point z. Upper left Y coordinate to the point z. Thank you in advance.