Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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Meaning of expression “Carry a card”

What is the meaning of carry a card in this context? Mary Webster's Sarah's carried a card for years, so's everybody's cook in this town. The place is the American South (Alabama). Sarah was a ...
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42 views

What is the exact definition of “set off” in the expression “set off by (a pair of) commas?”

It seems to me that in English usage "set off" is almost irreplaceable in the collocation I refer to in the question and in similar phrases, e.g., "comma(s) set(s) off (this or that)." As if everyone ...
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29 views

Another way to write, ''Why now''? When people know it is good, but are suspicious of the timing)

Another way to write, ''Why now''? (When people know it is good, but are suspicious of the timing)
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133 views

Usage of “give it a read”

Is the usage of the phrase "give it a read" correct? For instance, "Hey, I have attached my essay. Do give it a read and let me know what you think".
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58 views

What's the phrase for reading a website “cover to cover”

How do I describe having read a website completely, 'cover to cover'?
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43 views

What is the origin of the phrase “has some teeth to it”?

I know the phrase "has some teeth to it" refers to something that cuts and/or takes hold of something. It's used a lot in arguments / discussion of topics where serious / good counterpoints are used, ...
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25 views

Is ‘return good’ an idiomatic response?

Can I reply to someone's ‘Thank you’ with ‘return good’? For example: A: Thank you for all your advice and guidance. B: You're welcome, I hope it will return good on you.
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38 views

Can I use “short of being exhaustive” in this case?

I'm making a list and want the reader to know that this list is not complete, that it is only a part of a larger list... Is it correct to say "this list is short of being exhaustive" in this case? Is ...
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46 views

“Front of action” vs “action front”

Is there any distinction between "fronts of action" and "action fronts", or are these expressions equally correct and have exactly the same meaning? Here are some EXAMPLES I found in the Internet. ...
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32 views

'In the ranks' OR 'With the ranks'

Which of the following two phrases is correct? I'd put him right there in the ranks of the best anthropologists out there. OR I'd put him right there with the ranks of the best ...
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48 views

“Hazard area” or “hazardous area”?

What is the more common word combination? Or do they mean different things? It refers i. a. to explosion protection. Example: hazard area plan or hazardous area plan
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30 views

“What makes… ” and “Why is…” : How different are they?

In a book we are reading there is a sentence that goes "What makes his face so strange?" As non-native speakers we are wondering if there is any difference in meaning if you say "Why is his face so ...
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42 views

bleed inside out/got-have got

I've been wondering if there is the expression "I bleed inside out" or if it is correct. For example "someone or something makes me bleed inside out" - as we say "it breaks my heart". And actually I ...
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44 views

Origins of “from the outside” (to mean from the beginning)

I came across a sentence that went something like this: I wish I'd known about this from the outside - I would have done a better job. I've heard "from the outside" used like this before a ...
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85 views

Is “And this X?” a common English expression?

In Spanish we say, "And this X?" as a short form for "And who is X?" Example: When I entered the room with Billy, Tom looked up and said, "And this high school brat?" Is this also a common ...
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68 views

Avoiding Ignorance

Is the phrase "avoid ignorance" idiomatic? In my mind something is wrong about the combination of the verb "avoid" and the noun "ignorance".
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44 views

Is “more general, still” an acceptable expression?

Are "more general, still", or "more general, yet" acceptable variations of "still more general"?
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42 views

Can I say “X decreases the contribution of our report”?

I'd like to mention that the contribution of my writing report will be less if I do not describe about previous research. Is it possible to say that "it decrease the contribution of our report if I ...
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63 views

How to refer to something “demanding” which doesn't happen all of a sudden?

Looking for a verb to express something that requires some time and effort to evolve, like collecting. I want to express that collecting requires some time and the collection doesn't just come out ...
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122 views

Another word for “A relationship of causality/ cause-effect relationship”

I am not sure if "cause-effect relationship" fits in this context. I have looked for better alternatives but I couldn't find one that fits here: So far, this chapter has provided an analysis of ...
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117 views

“It was always a question for me…”

Is it correct to use the phrase "It was always a question for me..." ? For example, "It was always a question for me that no one liked the cake." or "It was always a question for me why no one liked ...
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160 views

“father to” vs. “father of”

Would it be grammatically correct to write Mister X is father to a son and a daughter or should one preferably choose the preposition of? Mister X is father of a son and a daughter. ...
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64 views

How to express “prefer in order”

Let say, I am a little boy and my mother had several fruits (orange, apple, banana,...) and she asked me which one which I like, but she was not sure if she could give me that fruit ( I don't know why ...
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160 views

Question/Matter of definition?

A "Definitionsfråga", as it is called in Swedish, is for instance if you talk about what's good and bad, you can remark that it depends on what you mean by good and bad. You could might as well remark ...
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35 views

Connecting sentences with “that is”

Suppose a sentence such as Let X := a and Y := b, that is X is foo and Y is bar .. Is this correct english? I try to first a give a formal mathematical definition of X and Y, and then repeat the ...
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28 views

English Sentence interpretation

Under the schedule of rates of a commercial contract it is specified that schedule of prices includes "All rents, royalties, licenses, permits, permissions and any other fee, duty, penalty, levy, ...
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151 views

Is this proper use

I was watching the movie Man of Steel and in it is this passage: "There's only one way this ends Cal; either you die, or I do." Now this sounds wrong to me. There's two outcomes. "There's only on ...
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English word for superstitiously negative self assumption

Is there an English word (or psychological condition), which describes the negative, fearful, superstitious mentality of immediate self application or assumption? For example if I was to say "my ...
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25 views

On the referent of 'during that time' / 'meanwhile'

Can during that time refer to a relatively long time? Or can during that time be used regardless of whether the span is long or short? For example, I think (1) is ok: (1) I waited for a bus for 10 ...
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46 views

Correct way to ask something

I'd like to know if 'How are you and your family?' and 'How are you and yours?' are both right?
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44 views

“Preventing them to wrap” vs “Preventing them from wrapping”

I've found on StackOverflow an old answer written by me, in which I've used the first form. Reading it now, it sounds weird and wrong; I am inclined to think that the second form is the only one ...
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14 views

“dollar rebounds biggest falls”

I found the sentence like the below. "Dollar rebounds biggest falls" Does this sentence make any sense? I guess it should be "dollar rebounds after its biggest falls" instead.
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“It's like with” as replacement of “I'm in the same situation as…”

Is this a valid replacement? Example: Speaker A: I'm planning to quit. Speaker B: Why? Speaker A: It's like with Mrs. Anderson. I'm tired of not making any progress. (Speaker A is ...
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29 views

What is the similar expression of “the young go-getters” in BE?

Could anyone help me? If I am asking the UK expression that is similar with this US colloquialism “the young go getters”, would I learn something from you?
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Is “Interpose Model” the correct term

I have a question in context of electrical engineering. Imagine a schematic of electrical components or a netlist, where I want to change the behavior of one part by cutting the wiring and adding a ...
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34 views

Is this an acceptable way of claiming emphasis?

I proposed this edit to a Stack Exchange answer. Because there were three rather lengthy block quotes, I thought bolding the most relevant sentences would be helpful to readers, especially if they ...
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59 views

Can the adjective “sexist” be replaced by “chauvinistic” in this context?

Can chauvinistic denote the same meaning as sexist in this sentence? The nature of these rituals generates a sexist mentality among the new members.
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62 views

“This isn't the place for you” meaning?

Would you say that this line is an indirect way of telling someone they shouldn't come/be somewhere? Or if not indirect, maybe some other adjective?
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131 views

Meaning of “fact of nature” in a paragraph

A friend of mine is translating a text about the Millennial Generation and asked me about the meaning of "fact of nature" in the excerpt "technology wasn't a fact of nature at these times". It is part ...
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“On the one after,” vs “on the one that followed.”

Which one is more common, more idiomatic? Example: My brother's exams would end next week, so we decided to take the trip on the one after. My brother's exams would end next week, so we ...
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60 views

Two questions - present progressive

I know that saying "I just saw her" is correct, but people also say "I've just arrived", so saying "I've just seen her" is also correct? Maybe it's a UK/US difference ? If it's correct, then "Just" ...
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74 views

Way to indicate coordinates

Do the following two sentences mean the same thing? Upper left Y coordinate relative to the point z. Upper left Y coordinate to the point z. Thank you in advance.
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83 views

“I might as well have imagined” vs “I might as well have been remembering”

Which one is the correct form, or at least the most commonly used? Example: 1207 B.C. Wow, I found it impossible to imagine a time as far in the past as that. I might as well have imagined ...
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71 views

What is this type of “double-entry” phrase called?

What are the word combinations called? (Blank AND Blank) they are often used... Law and Order Judge and Jury Cops and Robbers Bait and Switch Cease and Desist Stop and Go Checks and ...
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95 views

Different sounds of “s” at the end of a word

Here is a sentence: This is a pen. Why do we pronounce 's' at the end of this and 'z' sound with is? By sound this sentence could be pronounce such as "dis iz a pen". Could anyone tell me the ...
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105 views

“Comfort me in accomplishing my task”

In a formal letter, can one say comfort me in accomplishing my task as in Your presence will significantly enhance this scientific event and comfort me in accomplishing my task. ...
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Is it “a spyglass TO the past” or “a spyglass INTO the past”

I'd like to use the phrase XYZ as a spyglass (in)to the past. as title for a publication on a scientific method that allows me to infer knowledge about the past from data available now. E.g., the ...
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72 views

A word or term for extrapolation fallacy or using results beyond their context? [Solved]

I am looking for a word or term that means something like: you are using previous results outside boundaries of the original experiment/observation earlier experience/results does not apply in all ...
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141 views

What does it mean “off one's look”

I've come across the following passage in a script. PERSON 1: And tomatoes are actually berries! The others look at him with annoyed confusion. PERSON 1: (off their looks) What? It’s ...
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Another way to say “Condolence”

I'm looking for words/phrases that can substitute the use of word "condolence" during a funeral. I'm searching for another alternative to avoid repetition of such expression in the grieving party, in ...