Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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112 views

A simile / metaphor for the concept that an entity is formed from a wide range of factors

I am trying to explain that health is not simply determined by biological factors. Instead it is shaped by a whole host of variables: lifestyle, education, culture, attitudes, socio-economic factors ...
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4answers
197 views

Meaning of expression “take contingency on someone”

What exactly does a phrase 'we need to take contingency on them' mean? This is an expression I heard from a project manager so I presume it has to do smth with risk mitigation. However, I'd rather not ...
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3answers
46 views

Is there a term for extracting a cultural element from its originating environment and placing it in a foreign and contrived context?

I have a nagging feeling there’s a word or term for this practice. The example that lead to this question has to do with a food truck. A bar/restaurant in my city has apparently had an actual truck ...
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3answers
1k views

Is it OK to say “There is no problem if you do it next week.”?

I need to reply to a commercial email where my "colleague" says that he we will do the job next week. Is it good English to say "There is no problem if you do it next week." ? Is there another way to ...
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2answers
225 views

If we can fall in love, why can't we fall in anger?

Although we can look back in anger, we can't fall into it. I might argue that the phrase, to fall in love, has something to do with being helpless, of letting go and losing control. But what ...
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2answers
86 views

What is the difference between “extended from” and “extending from”?

Scenario 1: part A is extended from part B Scenario 2: part A is extending from part B Is there any difference between these two descriptions? Would any one so kind to help me about this? Thanks in ...
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2answers
139 views

Usage of “I'm incredulous!” as an exclamation of shock or disbelief

Would the exclamation "I'm incredulous!" be an appropriate response to finding out some unexpected news, if the intention is to convey shock or disbelief?
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2answers
358 views

Is “not worth to do” an acceptable alternative to “not worth doing”?

Basically what the title says, nothing more to add. I've encountered the former form on the Internet more than once, hence the question. Thanks!
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2answers
302 views

Other ways to say a project is ahead of schedule?

I'm looking for ways to say a business project is (or will be) completed ahead of schedule. Obviously, there are plenty of phrases for delayed or on-time statuses, but what are some phrases for ...
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1answer
58 views

How can “in touch with” be used figuratively?

I am sure that we can say “get in touch with someone”, to mean figuratively that we are in good contact. Can I go further to use it more figuratively, e.g., to say that “my brother is not in touch ...
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1answer
99 views

Help understanding a sentence/reference

The introductory paragraph of the book An Introduction to Mathematics, written for general audience by the great British mathematician Alfred North Whitehead goes like this: Chapter 1: THE ...
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1answer
45 views

What's the phrase for reading a website “cover to cover”

How do I describe having read a website completely, 'cover to cover'?
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1answer
102 views

Alternative for Under the Guidance of

I am writing a statement of purpose and want an alternative for "under the guidance of Professor". I has been used many times in the SOP and I want to avoid using it as much as possible. One ...
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1answer
91 views

Question/Matter of definition?

A "Definitionsfråga", as it is called in Swedish, is for instance if you talk about what's good and bad, you can remark that it depends on what you mean by good and bad. You could might as well remark ...
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1answer
73 views

“father to” vs. “father of”

Would it be grammatically correct to write Mister X is father to a son and a daughter or should one preferably choose the preposition of? Mister X is father of a son and a daughter. ...
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1answer
44 views

Is “from … over … to …” correct?

I came across a title with a "from A over B to C" structure, namely "Facts and events from the USA over the UK to Australia" Now, I personally think this is incorrect (potentially a carbon copy ...
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1answer
46 views

How to express “prefer in order”

Let say, I am a little boy and my mother had several fruits (orange, apple, banana,...) and she asked me which one which I like, but she was not sure if she could give me that fruit ( I don't know why ...
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1answer
47 views

Time reference and express attractivness of a fitting job role in cover letter?

I found a job ad of a job which is perfect for me. I have the following sentences: After my studies and acquiring the IBM certificates I am now searching for a position as an programmer. The ...
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1answer
104 views

A word that describes stories with negative and unfulfilling endings?

I'm trying to find a word or phrase that describes the ending to a story where the outcome is generally negative and unfulfilling. At the end of these stories, the protagonist usually makes a decision ...
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1answer
213 views

Use of the word “definitive edition”

Can I use the phrase "definitive edition" to explain that a product has the most up-to-date and highest quality in the field as opposite to mean "last edition of the same series"? Thank you for your ...
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1answer
65 views

How to express combinations using “any […] by […]”

I'm writing a text in which I need to repeat combinations of k out of n - for example, "any 2 out of 6" - but I think something the likes of "any 6 by 2" would be more appropriate since the subject is ...
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1answer
81 views

Is this proper use

I was watching the movie Man of Steel and in it is this passage: "There's only one way this ends Cal; either you die, or I do." Now this sounds wrong to me. There's two outcomes. "There's only on ...
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1answer
564 views

What's a better way of saying “rarely used”

I'm writing an article about using rarely used English words and how to learn and use them. As an example I'd like to find an alternate way of saying "rarely used" I believe there should be one word ...
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1answer
148 views

how to say “etc” in a subject

I am translating some legal certificate and I need to indicate that a construction method and related factors are in accordance with a law. I am not sure what is the appropriate way to describe ...
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1answer
308 views

How do we use 'Stockholm syndrome' in a sentence?

How do we use 'Stockholm Syndrome' in a sentence? Can it be used for the things we hate?
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1answer
568 views

What does “can be said to do / to be” something mean?

The various modern revolutions in physics, in psychology, in politics, even in literary style, have not escaped his intelligent notice, but they can scarcely be said to have influenced him deeply. ...
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1answer
162 views

Looking for an expression that means “I'm at an event right now”

Is there any simple and frequently used expression that means "I'm at an event right now", like "I'm here", or "I'm present"?
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1answer
55 views

by the way of our thinking Vs. by the way we think

Is it correct to say Everything changes by the way of our thinking. or should I say: Everything changes by the way we think. And how different are they in meaning?
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0answers
82 views

My grandmother used an idiom “ ought have been a wheelbarrow”

My grandmother (who was of Irish descent)was born in the New England area of NSW, Australia. She used an idiom that she "ought have been a wheelbarrow". I think it meant something about a lack of ...
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0answers
66 views

Do people in Colorado typically say “attorney” or “lawyer?”

I'm interested to know if people in the Colorado area say attorney or lawyer more frequently.
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0answers
44 views

Two questions - present progressive

I know that saying "I just saw her" is correct, but people also say "I've just arrived", so saying "I've just seen her" is also correct? Maybe it's a UK/US difference ? If it's correct, then "Just" ...
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0answers
38 views

Way to indicate coordinates

Do the following two sentences mean the same thing? Upper left Y coordinate relative to the point z. Upper left Y coordinate to the point z. Thank you in advance.
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0answers
50 views

“I might as well have imagined” vs “I might as well have been remembering”

Which one is the correct form, or at least the most commonly used? Example: 1207 B.C. Wow, I found it impossible to imagine a time as far in the past as that. I might as well have imagined ...
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0answers
59 views

What is this type of “double-entry” phrase called?

What are the word combinations called? (Blank AND Blank) they are often used... Law and Order Judge and Jury Cops and Robbers Bait and Switch Cease and Desist Stop and Go Checks and ...
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0answers
74 views

Different sounds of “s” at the end of a word

Here is a sentence: This is a pen. Why do we pronounce 's' at the end of this and 'z' sound with is? By sound this sentence could be pronounce such as "dis iz a pen". Could anyone tell me the ...
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0answers
67 views

“Comfort me in accomplishing my task”

In a formal letter, can one say comfort me in accomplishing my task as in Your presence will significantly enhance this scientific event and comfort me in accomplishing my task. ...
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0answers
30 views

Is it “a spyglass TO the past” or “a spyglass INTO the past”

I'd like to use the phrase XYZ as a spyglass (in)to the past. as title for a publication on a scientific method that allows me to infer knowledge about the past from data available now. E.g., the ...
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0answers
54 views

A word or term for extrapolation fallacy or using results beyond their context? [Solved]

I am looking for a word or term that means something like: you are using previous results outside boundaries of the original experiment/observation earlier experience/results does not apply in all ...
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0answers
93 views

What does it mean “off one's look”

I've come across the following passage in a script. PERSON 1: And tomatoes are actually berries! The others look at him with annoyed confusion. PERSON 1: (off their looks) What? It’s ...
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23 views

A question regarding the use of “for” or “with” in an expression

Which of the following two is correct? (a) "jumped for joy" (b) "jumped with joy"