Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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11
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7answers
1k views

More eloquent idiom/expression for the phrase “cut it at the roots/source to prevent the problem from growing/escalating ”

There's nothing particularly wrong with the phrase that's in the title except I figure there may be some better sounding alternative or something more pleasing to the ears. Example usage: We have to ...
4
votes
3answers
49 views

the expression is roughly equivalent to “ Cover your breast over the baby's mouth”

In my own language, the "Cover your breasts over the baby's mouth" is such a lovely and interesting idiom. It's derived from the thing that is: a baby cries very much and the mother is too busy with ...
-1
votes
1answer
40 views

'passive' vs 'active' dietary therapy

How do I explain that my questionnaire included range levels of active dietary therapy and passive dietary therapy? is it even correct to say "passive dietary therapy"? if not, how do I say it ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Using 'On the night' [on hold]

When I was on my English academy I was told that to refer to something that happens at night I should use 'at' and not 'on'. However, there is a Dire Strait album called 'On the night' so that title ...
3
votes
3answers
151 views

What do we call “easily readable books”?

I just wonder if there is a good expression to refer to an "easily readable book", like a simple short story or pocket book?
2
votes
1answer
32 views

Is there a phrase for “something good that doesn't last long”?

In Arabic, the expression "Summer cloud" is usually used to mean that "this is not going to last for a long time" or "it won't last as long as you think it will". Is there an equivalent phrase in ...
10
votes
7answers
7k views

Is there a phrase to say that someone's hidden intentions are revealed in his/her talk or movements?

Is there an English expression to say "Le jupon dépasse" to express the fact that someone's hidden intentions are revealed in his/her talk or movements?
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Word for turning a situation around on someone

Let me describe the situation: My wife has been having issues with a certain employee at work...long story short, this other employee now goes out of her way to try and exclude/snub/cold shoulder my ...
2
votes
2answers
59 views

Word for different office/work “cultures”

I am looking for a word to describe differences between two groups of professional fields. Our small company is having a competition for best outside-of-work pictures. There are about 10 people in ...
-3
votes
0answers
21 views

Is there any difference between the meanings of “phonetic translation”, “phonetic transcription”, and “transliteration”?

I was asked to provide phonetic translation for legal name (as original characters are none-Latin characters), does it mean I must make transliteration (or phonetic transcription)?
1
vote
4answers
97 views

How can something be “set in stone”?

Something could be carved in stone, or etched in stone. Or it could be set in concrete or set in mortar. But if someone asked me to set something in stone, I wouldn't know how to do it, since stone ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American people?

Was H. L. Mencken the first to say 'Nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American people.", or was he paraphrasing another comentator?
1
vote
5answers
46 views

Word or phrase for the moment/reason/motive you reveal to someone why you had acted a certain way prior to parting ways

A massive cliche in action movies (especially James Bond), but is there actually a word for that moment when the evil villain reveals their deadly plot to the action hero before (usually attempting ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Why do the words ducky and jake mean fine or satisfactory?

Even the Merriam-Webster dictionary acknowledges both ducky and jake as acceptable terms meaning fine or satisfactory and it dates the word ducky back to 1897 and jake to 1914. Does anyone know how ...
0
votes
3answers
42 views

If someone has the right to something, how could I say in this situation

If someone has the right to something, how could I say in this situation. My client would like an organiser to cover flight ticket fare for business class due to physical health problem. According to ...
6
votes
5answers
150 views

What's the more common way to refer to a road with 180° curves?

A hairpin road is a road with hairpin turns or bends. According to Wikipedia: A hairpin bend , named for its resemblance to a hairpin/bobby pin, is a bend in a road with a very acute ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Is this correct? : “Tenji that was, died in his sisters arms.” (Kind of like 'powers that be') Also is 'have a claim to' correct' or 'hold a claim to'

Full quote for context "I have no claim to life, yet I walk. I have no claim to valor, yet I fight. I have no claim to love, yet I mourn. I am not the dragon, for Tenji Minamoto that was, died in his ...
6
votes
2answers
10k views

Origin of “pull your socks up”?

I was pulling my socks up this morning, in the literal sense of the term, when I started to wonder about why pull your socks up came to mean what it does:- to make an effort to improve your work ...
10
votes
14answers
10k views

Looking for idiom/expression to describe an instance where one makes something seem better than it really is

Maybe the example would help to describe the expression I am looking for: Say - a sub-par school or organization makes a promotional video, whereby they make the school look way better than it ...
3
votes
1answer
43 views

What do you call the tendency to oversimplify an issue?

I have noticed that there is a tendency in many people, and certainly in groups as a whole, to avoid, ignore, or trivialize complex and difficult issues by placing focus on issues that are similar and ...
81
votes
3answers
14k views

Why does “Mickey Mouse Operation” refer to a poorly run company?

A phrase I commonly hear (and use myself) when a company (or individual, in some cases) does something that seems foolish or not planned is to ask What kind of Mickey Mouse operation are you ...
-1
votes
1answer
120 views

At the end of the day And By the end of the day [closed]

At the end of the day And By the end of the day I am confusing to use this words What is the differents between these words, Could your please some scenario of this two words Thanks
3
votes
3answers
84 views

How should we describe a misdiagnosis due to the fact that the correct diagnosis has not yet been discovered?

Respected members I am a primary care pediatrician from South India, with 31 years experience after my graduation and 26 yeas after MD. Primary care rests on three pillars. Equity,(not equality), ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

'a same matrix' or 'the same matrix'? [on hold]

Synchronizing only a seed between the local sites and fusion center can let the pseudo-random number generators generate the same matrix A. Or Synchronizing only a seed between the local sites and ...
17
votes
10answers
3k views

What is the expression for the process of getting over the loss of a loved person?

The term mourning usually refers to the sorrow felt because of the death of a person: Great ​sadness ​felt because someone has ​died: Shops were ​closed as a ​sign of mourning for the ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

What is the correct way to use “Hands Down” in a sentence, grammar-wise? [on hold]

What is the correct option\s in this case? Hands down, the best value for your money! Hands down, get best value for your money! It's hands down the best value for your money! The best value for ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Is this original or did I hear it somewhere?

My neighbour was down-sizing her library, and insisted on keeping certain titles so, "people who look at my books will know that I'm well-read and have some intelligence." They'll see that you have "...
0
votes
1answer
486 views

Usage of 'Ohh stop it, you!'

Heard it quite a few times in television series episodes but find it hard to use it in real life. I have found this question 'Use of the expression "Stop it! You are too cute"' which I think ...
-2
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0answers
28 views

Conflict Resolution during Oral Presentation [closed]

You might be confronted with a listener, who doesnot agree with your point of view.What strategy would you apply in case a conflict arises during presentation.
0
votes
1answer
48 views

“Divide the divided”? [on hold]

Is there a political hypothesis that has the same meaning as "dividing the divided"? I've seen it in Arabic but didn't find the English equivalent. It's used in the context of countries. It is like "...
5
votes
4answers
139 views

Equivalent idiom for “turning in one's grave” for a living person?

If you do something that would greatly upset a deceased person, it would cause him to "turn in his grave". However, what if the person affected is still alive? Is there an equivalent idiom for this?
2
votes
1answer
55 views

'There is no such a thing as a free lunch' in academic writing [on hold]

In the context of an academic publication in British English, I'm tempted to paraphrase the expression "There is no such a thing as a free lunch". Does it sound too informal and, if so, are there ...
0
votes
1answer
977 views

Foot/head of stairs

I just want to confirm that I am right about these expressions. The "foot of the stairs" is the bottom of the staircase, and the "head of the stairs" is the top, correct? Are these expressions ...
-2
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3answers
3k views

Can I treat “of course” and “of course not” like “yes” and “no”?

Which of these two expressions is correct? 1) Of course not, I am here. 2) Of course not, I am not here. For example: Yes, he is a boy The word "yes" emphatically introduces a ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Word or phrase for customers won from a competitor

In the context of a company that makes or sells a product (e.g. accounting software) where there are many alternatives on the market, is there a word or [short] phrase to describe "new customers that ...
6
votes
5answers
20k views

How to express your supporting someone's decision no matter what? [on hold]

My wife is trying to start a new job and I want to say something like "I will always support your decision no matter what your decisions would be..." How do you express that in English in a way a ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Hit and miss, or hit or miss?

Are both "Hit and miss" and "Hit or miss" valid English phrases? Hit-and-Miss Misses the Grammar Mark claims that "Hit and miss" is illogical, but I see both in Google NGrams.
7
votes
1answer
392 views

What does the phrase, “ninesigma worthy,” mean?

A person whom I met recently said something that I consider a bit odd. During our conversation, the topic of lost items arose. "Personally," he said, "I'm glad that over all the years I have not lost ...
0
votes
4answers
5k views

Meaning of “cavorting with various women”

I've heard of the expression cavorting with various women. Apparently, Google says the original expression is cavorting with the enemy, but I take that the definition is slightly different then. What ...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

Where did the phrase “drop the hammer” come from?

Where did the phrase "drop the hammer" come from? It's what you do when you start to go balls to the wall. I've only heard it rowing.
0
votes
2answers
237 views

what does “to which it is a party” mean in this sentence?

I have a statement here, and I dont get the meaning exactly: Each of the Members agrees to make an annual report to the International Labour Office on the measures which it has taken to give ...
-1
votes
1answer
32 views

“server, please!” — is there a comma in there?

Related to youtube/5ycx9hFGHog, I'd like to know whether it is correct or incorrect to put a comma between "server" and "please", when writing about an act of calling one's server, whether the "please"...
-2
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0answers
29 views

Invictus, By William Ernest Henley [closed]

Each of the four paragraph have unique phrasing has meaning. For example fell clutch of circumstance Looms but the Horror of the shade it matters not how strait the gate how charged with ...
24
votes
3answers
2k views

Why are “slip roads” called that way?

Slip roads are used to allow vehicles to merge in a road whose speed is higher or, conversely, let them leave it safely. This term appears to be British English usage. Here is an example of usage: ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

How to correctly name the windows on a wristwatch?

Well, I know it can seem to be primitive, but I cannot find a sharp definition. I am working for a wristwatches catalog, and it must be stated right. Some manufacturers call it a crystal, some call ...
-1
votes
0answers
30 views

Electric cars are easier to make our dreams come true than gas fueled cars [on hold]

Electric cars are easier to make our dreams come true than gas fueled cars. This sentence does not sound right to me. Can anyone explain why I might think so.
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“Hand over hand” and “hand over fist”

The expressions "hand over hand" and "hand over fist" seem to be related. Apparently "hand over hand" was a British term for the act of moving quickly up a rope or hoisting a sail, which was a matter ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

What's a phrase to capture traffic, road type, weather conditions?

What is a short phrase that could be used to describe the conditions under which one is driving (traffic, road type, stop-and-go, weather)? Our product provides a "rating" to consumers of how risky ...
3
votes
3answers
534 views

Portuguese native speaker

In order to be clear enough, I would say that I am a "European Portuguese native speaker" rather than a "Portuguese native speaker". - As a translator, I am expected to let potential clients know my ...
2
votes
2answers
67 views

More inclusive/formal synonym for “grandfathered in”?

The expression "grandfathered in" or similar expressions like "grandfather clause" aren't always immediately clear to people for whom English is a second language. But I'm hard pressed to come up ...