Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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Word for “a sudden death”

A neighbour of mine died last week a moment after reaching his climax during the sexual intercourse with his young partner. He was 79 years old. Is there any available English word to describe his ...
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“Feel it in my bones”

Does "Feel it in my bones" sound natural? I have never seen or heard any native speakers use something like that, except in a subtitle of a movie I watched long ago. What are other phrases, or common ...
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What is a “mind-share leader”? [closed]

My limited understanding is that it applies to a company that comes first when people think about a particular topic. Could I say Microsoft is a mind-share leader for Operating Systems? The ...
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Why does ‘you’re on’ mean ‘I agree’?

One dictionary says ‘you’re on’ is used tell someone that you accept a bet or an invitation to compete against them. Then why does it use ‘you’ instead of ‘I’? What’s the ‘on’? In terms of the meaning,...
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Where does the phrase “possession is ( nine points | nine-tenths ) of the law” come from?

I've seen dozens of arguments for the correctness and/or precedence of one version over the other, but have not come across compelling sources or well-documented explanations for either. Does anyone ...
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“beef cacky” and “cheese cacky” as physical descriptions

Can "beef cacky" or "cheese cacky" be used to describe the physique of a person? I don't know where does this come from, but I found a reference here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fH2Pg0W3lok&...
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Origins of the phrase “You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows”?

You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows. This phrase is famously used in Subterranean Homesick Blues by Bob Dylan. The metaphor itself is so simple and powerful I'm sure it ...
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1answer
717 views

Is ‘eclectic bunch’ trendy instead of simply saying ‘a group of different types of constituents'?

I found the words ‘eclectic bunch’ in the following sentence of a New York Times (July 29, 2011) article reporting increase in foraging in city parks, which is titled ‘Enjoy Park Greenery, City Says, ...
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What might “knock me over with a feather” mean?

I recently received a text message which read: "well, knock me over with a feather!" It was in response to a statement which may or may not have been surprising (I honestly have no idea). Has anyone ...
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What’s the meaning of “I don’t care…” as a reply to a poor joke?

Is he saying he doesn’t like the playful attitude? Or is he cynically referring to part of the joke? I’m reading a Harry Potter book and found ‘I don’t care …’ in a scene. For the moment, I have ...
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What is the origin of the expression “brassed off”?

Brass bands were being discussed today which naturally led to someone claiming to be brassed off about something, meaning disgruntled or annoyed. Does anyone know the origin of this expression? ...
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“Hand over hand” and “hand over fist”

The expressions "hand over hand" and "hand over fist" seem to be related. Apparently "hand over hand" was a British term for the act of moving quickly up a rope or hoisting a sail, which was a matter ...
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1answer
703 views

Expression “shockingly enough”

Is the expression shockingly enough an understatement? I've heard of oddly enough and took it to mean to some extent, it's odd, but the combination of shockingly and enough sounds like you are ...
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8answers
20k views

History of “X is dead. Long live X”

What is the history of "X is dead. Long live X"? For example, Location is dead. Long live Location. JavaScript is dead. Long live JavaScript. I feel like I'm missing out on a joke.
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Difference between phrase, idiom and expression [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the difference between an expression and a phrase? Difference between “phrase” and “idiom” What is the difference between a phrase, an ...
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What is the meaning of “Set us up the [noun]”?

Why would someone frequently say "Someone set us up the (thing)" when referring to things done to or for them. For example: "Someone set us up the breakfast." "Someone set us up the game....
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Why “horseback riding” and not simply “horse riding”?

As a German horse riding seems to be to the point. Why is it horseback riding in English? Isn't it obvious that you ride on the back of the horse? Is there a difference between British and American ...
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What is meant by “don't piss on my boots and tell me it's raining”?

I have heard a couple of times recently the phrase "don't piss on my boots and tell me it's raining", usually in the context of a heated argument so I've hesitated to ask speaker what exactly he meant ...
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2answers
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Where does the term “make sure” come from?

I was reading the Mac OS X Lion upgrade page, and it said "make sure" all over the place. It struck me as odd. Where does the term "make sure" come from? What are you making to be sure? Yourself? ...
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What does 'a beautifully-proportioned room' mean?

“Oh I would never dream of assuming I know all Hogwarts’ secrets, Igor,” said Dumbledore amicably. “Only this morning, for instance, I took a wrong turning on the way to the bathroom and found myself ...
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What does “creeping on one's turf” mean?

When you check in on foursquare to a place whose mayor is your friend, your check-in message is "Your friend X is the mayor here (and you're creeping on their turf)." What does this expression mean? ...
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What is the meaning of a parenthetic ‘that one’ in a sentence?

“It is too ‘eavy, all zis ‘Ogwarts food,” they heard her saying grumpily as they left the Great Hall behind her one evening. “I will not fit into my dress robes!” “Oooh there’s a tragedy,” ...
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How does “very much” fit in with “thank you very much”?

I would never say, "I am sorry very much" or "You're welcome very much", why is it that it fits well with "Thank You"?
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English expression for “ascribing negative intentions to someone”

There's a French expression that means "ascribing negative intentions to someone with no factual base" (prêter des intentions). It's practical, as the English sentence "stop ascribing negative ...
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“I can only hope to X”

When someone says "I can only hope to X", what does she mean? How is it different from the simpler expression "I hope to X"? Would it be natural to use "I can only hope to" in the following case? ...
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What does the phrase “the fine point” mean?

I heard about this sentence, "How to do it well? The fine point: ...." What does 'the fine point' mean in this context?
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How can I answer the question “What is the word, bird?” [closed]

I'm often asked a question "What is the word, bird?" by a manager of mine. I'm not sure what does it mean but I think it means "What's your last status update?" and I answer like I do have to do 1, 2, ...
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2answers
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What Exactly is Meant by “X Puts Y to Shame?”

In the movie Camelot, Lancelot told Guenevere that "your face has a luster, that puts gold to shame." What does "put to shame" mean in this context?
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Expression “counterprogramming” also for social events?

Would it be adequate to use the term "counterprogramming" also for non-TV events like counterprogramming a party at the same time of another one? For example: I am sorry I didn't check the date ...
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What's the origin of the term “call” in card games?

What is the origin of the term "to call" in card games like poker? I can understand that one can "raise" the bet, but why does one want to say "call" to match a bet or match a raise? How would that ...
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4answers
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Pioneers Often Die with Arrows in their Backs

What's the meaning of Pioneers Often Die with Arrows in their Backs I mean i can roughly gauge it to be the first to move dies, but why arrows in the backs ?
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Expression for “cold headhunting”

Is there an expression for the case when someone receives an email from a recruiter with whom he had no previous contact? I am looking for a term other than headhunting, like salesman knocking on cold ...
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What does “you and the rest of the world” mean?

I sometimes see ‘you and …’ in English, for example “you and the other nine”, “You and your big mouth!”. This makes me sensitive to you and something. “Okay,” said Harry slowly. “But … are you ...
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“By the way” in formal writing

Can I say "By the way" in an official document or professional meeting and other important/formal times? I never saw any film which would include these words.
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“I like living by ocean” , “I like living by the ocean” or “I like living by the sea”?

Which is the correct sentence: "I like living by ocean" , "I like living by the ocean" or "I like living by the sea"? I want to say I love ocean and I like staying nearby ocean. Update: I had been ...
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How could I express the idea that one person is learning the habits of other person?

I want to express the idea that one person is becoming like another person. I was thinking to use color, as in "Mr. X is getting colored in Mr. Y." Is this a common usage?
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What are the origins of: to “bleed something”?

I've come across the answer about what it means to bleed something but am having a hard time finding its origin. What was the original thing that was bled and in what context was it used?
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Expression “making a bid/break for freedom”?

What is the difference between "making a bid for freedom" and "making a break for freedom"? In which situations would one use one and not the other?
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The expression “hands down.”

How did the expression "hands down" come to mean "without a doubt?"
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8answers
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What is the difference between a marque and a brand?

What is the difference between a marque and a brand? For example, why would one use the expression "car marques" instead of "car brands"?
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Origin of the expression “part and parcel”

Does anybody know the origin of the expression "part and parcel"? Where and when did the word "parcel" start to be used?
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2answers
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PhD = Piled Higher and Deeper

For most folks, PhD means "Doctor of Philosophy". But, for Jorge Cham, it means "Piled Higher and Deeper". Can you explain to me the title of that comic book?
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“Figment” other than in “figment of the imagination”?

Are there any recurring uses of the word "figment" other than in the expression "figment of the imagination"?
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13answers
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What is an expression for something you particularly like?

I'm not a native English speaker. I want to find the English equivalent of ho un debole per le ragazze svedesi that, in Italian, basically means "I particularly like Swedish girls." (It's just ...
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What is the meaning of “chewing the carpet”?

I was digging about Load-Balancers (computer networking stuff) and came across this expression: Sometimes it (Load-Balancer) sits down chewing the carpet while backends go idle ... I guess "chewing ...
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3answers
2k views

How to describe something that is very likely happening immediately?

How should I describe something that will very likely happen right away? For example, would it be it correct to say, "It is about to rain"?
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Expression for “a regular bencher” in sports?

How would one describe a player in a team that is not playing much, and is usually just on the bench for most of the games?
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expression “caught between a rock and a hard place”

What is the origin and definition of the expression "caught between a rock and a hard place"? I also heard it in a situation where it could have had a jocose double sense, but I may have misunderstood....
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What does “it tastes like horspy” mean?

I heard an expression today but I did not know how it is written or what it is. And I could not find it with Google. It's something like: it tastes like horspy Any pointers?
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Meaning and origin of “dressed like a slob”

What does the expression "dressed like a slob" mean? Where does it come from?