Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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10
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5answers
324 views

Your Mileage May Vary [closed]

In the United States we have a saying, "your mileage may vary", which means "your experience may be different". In English-speaking countries that don't use Imperial miles, is there an equivalent ...
27
votes
4answers
5k views

Word meaning: A slip of the tongue which suggests how you actually feel, often humorous

I'm sure there's a word which matches this definition. Where you make a slight mistake in saying something and a friend will nudge you and say "oh, so that's what you really think?!" One example, ...
0
votes
2answers
123 views

What is meant by “still alive in kicking”? [closed]

Today I'd like to ask about an expression I heard on Youtube. I couldn't hear it clearly but a comedian said "He was still alive in kicking" (<-- this part is what I am not sure about) The story ...
2
votes
2answers
79 views

He makes a right turn to the corner vs. He makes a right turn at the corner

I wonder what's the difference between "make a right turn to the corner" and "make a right turn at the corner." My teachers could hardly explain why the former one is wrong, and I only ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

The word landscape as modifying a head noun

I want to use landscape experience in sentences contrasting it with aesthetic experience and spatial experience . The term landscape though is commonly taken as a noun. How could I indicate that I ...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

Hangin' on a string / You've got me hangin' on a string now

There's a song from the 80's whose title is "Hangin' on a string" (By Loose Ends). The singer keeps singning "You've got me hangin' on a string now". I wonder what it means exactly (You keep me ...
0
votes
1answer
89 views

What is generally considered the youngest age at which it's normal to call a girl a “young woman”? [closed]

It would obviously be ridiculous to call a 6-year old girl a young woman. What's the youngest age when it's no longer weird to call a girl that?
7
votes
1answer
752 views

When expressing temperatures that are colder than freezing, do we say “more than freezing”, “less than freezing”, or something else?

So my brother and I were standing out in the cold. Brother: "Man, it's cold." Me: "Yeah, it's freezing." Brother: "Man, it's more than freezing!" Me: Slightly confused, but perhaps thinking that he ...
3
votes
4answers
78 views

Meaningless Choice [duplicate]

What's a name for a meaningless choice? A choice that has no effect on outcome. Something similar to a phrase like "pyrrhic victory".
5
votes
10answers
1k views

How would you eloquently say “doing something for the umpteenth/nth/n-tieth time”?

I want to say that someone was doing (something) for the N-tieth time in a row, but in a way that emphasises both that this action is performed again, after a substantial amount of times (successfully,...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Is this correct? : “Tenji that was, died in his sisters arms.” (Kind of like 'powers that be') Also is 'have a claim to' correct' or 'hold a claim to'

Full quote for context "I have no claim to life, yet I walk. I have no claim to valor, yet I fight. I have no claim to love, yet I mourn. I am not the dragon, for Tenji Minamoto that was, died in his ...
4
votes
1answer
183 views

“Nothing particular” versus “Nothing in particular”

What is the difference between "Nothing particular" and "Nothing in particular"? I have been told that "Nothing particular" is grammatically incorrect and that "Nothing in particular" should be used ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

“I was beside myself” [closed]

I have heard this phrase many times from people describing anguish, hysteria, or just plain being upset with some event in their lives. What is the correct definition and examples of it's use?
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Usage of the expression “ad nauseum”

I would like to know if the expresssion can be used commonly or whether it would sound affected or out of place if not used in the appropriate context.
0
votes
2answers
367 views

“Of course not” or “of course no”?

I'm not a native English speaker, and I've heard this from a teacher of mine who is not a native speaker either. Is it correct to say "Of course no"?
0
votes
1answer
56 views

What does “It is warmer on the peaks than those in the valleys will ever know” mean?

I was looking for a phrase to put at the end of a worksheet just as a nice to have for the students when they were doing work and I came across the phrase: "It is warmer on the peaks than those in ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Is the sentence correct? [closed]

In China, the incidence of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is increasing by 5 percents every year, which is the fastest rising cancer in digestive tract.
0
votes
1answer
128 views

similar between or similar for?

For a research project I have a question about the correctness of the following phrases The mean activities were similar between group A and group B. The study demonstrated similarity in terms of ...
14
votes
1answer
2k views

Meaning of “Carrots aren't that great” in the sentence

I was reading "10 hurdles to Windows 10 adoption". In slide 12, there's this paragraph: I still think it’s smartest for Windows 7 customers to stand pat, unless they see something in Windows 10 ...
0
votes
1answer
197 views

Is “negotiation room” a correct expression?

Is "negotiation room" a correct expression? I'd like to use it in a sentence such as "there is still some room for negotiation on the terms and conditions." The idea is to show that we are still open ...
1
vote
2answers
57 views

Is it “the book that influences me most” or “the book that influences me the most”?

I'm not sure whether a "the" should be added before the "most" in this phrase. Or are they both OK but have different meaning?
1
vote
0answers
107 views

A word for saying exactly what you meant/wanted to

It seems to me that I've heard it before but it escapes me.. If I remember correctly the definition is relating to 'saying exactly the right thing at the right time' 'saying exactly what you meant ...
4
votes
2answers
103 views

I'm looking for a word that describes that moment you feel overwhelmed by the beauty and grandeur of nature

I was on a mountain the other day and had a moment where I just had to stop and take it all in. I felt insignificant (in the best way) and just stopped to admire where I was. The closest words I could ...
0
votes
0answers
109 views

“in a * perspective” or “from a * perspective”

Which is correct: "in a * perspective" or "from a * perspective"? So for example "Growing cucumber in a mathematical perspective" or "Growing cucumber from a mathematical perspective". Thanks, ...
8
votes
1answer
259 views

Etymology of the “half your age, plus seven” phrase? [closed]

Stories vary online about the origins of this. It comes up in French in the early 20th century, and apparently American newspapers in 1931. What are the earliest known examples in the English ...
0
votes
1answer
88 views

Is it a native way to say “I misremembered the time for the appointment”?

Is it a native way to say "I misremembered the time for the appointment"? Is therer any alternative way to express this meaning? Thank you!
1
vote
2answers
57 views

“In a very simple fashion”

I don't know where I've heard such expression. I try to explain (for sales) what our software tool does and I use this sentence: "It helps you to deploy apps in a very simple fashion". And then I ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Term to describe such conversational phrases [closed]

Is there a term to describe colloquial, chatty phrases such as: Weird, I know. Who knew there was a place called Pikachu. You may be wondering... I'm doing a written assignment and I have to ...
4
votes
5answers
94 views

Don't bring a knife to a gunfight

I need a "softer" analogy that means the same thing as "Don't bring a knife to a gunfight" or "It's like bringing a knife to a gunfight".
4
votes
3answers
155 views

The meaning of the idiom “pin one's hat on something”

HINOJOSA: And how they got there is the reason why the Kohn family is now part of a national scientific study to locate a gene for longevity. DR. TOM PERLS, CENTAGENETIX: We started off ...
1
vote
2answers
46 views

When everything is blinking, what’s still will be shown. What does this expression mean?

What does this expression mean? In a world of clutter, simplicity rules the throne. When everything is blinking, what’s still will be shown. ("Zen and the Art of Email Design," by Cameron ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Is “good for you” a sarcastic usage most of time? [closed]

I would like to know what "good for you" mean at most of time. After my own research, I knwe that it could mean "congratulations" and alternatively "would like an award" when speaking sacracsticlly. I ...
1
vote
2answers
33 views

Term/expression to describe a user's license (account) is allowed to be used?

I have a software that manages user accounts at a given service. The administrator creates the account, the user validates e-mail and other data and then the account is considered to be valid/good ...
2
votes
4answers
542 views

What do you call someone who solves puzzles?

What is a term or name for someone who is very adept at solving puzzles or situations that require though processing and logic. I ran across this question, however this only deals with crossword ...
0
votes
1answer
108 views

Word for the concept of a perfect fit [closed]

Is there any word to define the concept of something that fits perfectly? Like the expression "Fits like a glove" but shorter. The usage will be as an adjective to describe how well a outfit fits a ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Term for a storyline that splits in two

Is there a term for a storyline that splits into two points of view? For example, two characters who travel together split paths and plot unfolds in two different timelines. It can probably be applied ...
-1
votes
2answers
76 views

What does “I feel friendly” mean?

If I want to express the feeling that other people are very friendly to me, what is the proper way to say it? Is it okay to say:"I feel you are very friendly"? Is there any better way to say so? ...
1
vote
6answers
227 views

Men sweat, but women glisten. What's the equivalent for a woman for snoring?

Colloquially, we say that men sweat, but women glisten. Is there an equivalent word for describing when women snore?
0
votes
1answer
68 views

Why do people use the term "free gift'?

I see and hear the term "Free Gift". Are not all gifts free?
1
vote
1answer
26 views

Proper word for “all type of rooms / accommodations”?

I'm working on this app and right now it has a common taxonomy called "hotel". However, this app can work with hotels, chains of hotels, apartments, rooms, cabins, guesthouses and anything you could ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Which is better, no good at sports or not good at sports?

Which of the following sounds more natural to native ears? 1. I'm not good at sports. 2. I'm no good at sports. Is there any difference in the meaning?
6
votes
7answers
425 views

Expression for internal struggle

In German language, there is the beautiful expression "seinen inneren Schweinehund überwinden", which amounts to "to overcome one's inner pig-dog", and vividly describes the feeling of surpassing the ...
0
votes
2answers
196 views

Where does “the sky is falling” come from?

According to Wikipedia the common expression "the sky is falling" is from a folk tale: Henny Penny, more commonly known in the United States as "Chicken Little" and sometimes as "Chicken ...
2
votes
2answers
157 views

What does “Take care sweets” mean?

A good friend wrote me an email and at the end she added Take care sweets. I guess it's something good, but not sure what is the exact meaning. I searched a little bit what does that mean and didn't ...
1
vote
3answers
51 views

“accounts for up to” vs “is gained from”

I am arguing with my colleague about what phrase is easier to understand, i.e. "accounts for up to" vs "is gained from". My wording is the following: Sometimes this sector accounts for up to 70% ...
1
vote
1answer
126 views

What is the source for “My back foot!”

Does anyone know where the phrase "My back foot!", used as an expression of disbelief comes from? The seemingly, obvious source would be a reference to being on the defensive as to the truthfulness of ...
2
votes
0answers
71 views

What is the difference between “look into” and “look at” when used in figurative meaning? [closed]

Thank you for sending me the introduction of your company. We will "look into"/"look at" it later. What is the difference between "look into" and "look at" when used with a figurative meaning in ...
0
votes
1answer
116 views

where does the phrase “all of a 2 'n 8” originate from?

where does the phrase "all of a 2 'n 8" originate from? It means - not knowing what to do - confused - unsettled
10
votes
5answers
297 views

The “wrought /wreaked havoc” misunderstanding

According to the American Heritage Dictionary: the past tense and past participle of the verb to wreak is wreaked, not wrought, which is an alternative past tense and past participle of work. ...
1
vote
2answers
51 views

English (UK) - does “an enraged expression” make sense?

I am writing a book and one of my characters is angry but I feel like angry doesn't fit in and that enraged makes more sense and also makes the language of the book better but I'm not sure if it makes ...