Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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1answer
39 views

Origin of the term “grounded”

What is the origin of the term "grounded", as in "it keeps me grounded"? Does it simply come from the ground itself, which is to say keeping one's feet on the ground, or does it refer to "ground" in ...
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1answer
49 views

Should I use price, cost, or rate when referring to rent?

Example: I don't know which apartment to choose. The price/rate/cost in this city is just insane. What the most appropriate option?
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1answer
257 views

What are some colloquial English expressions for comparing hot/cold weather to something else? [closed]

I'm looking for colloquial expressions that compare hot, cold, and wet weather to something else. For example, “It’s hotter than two goats in a pepper patch”, “Colder than a witch’s tit”, etc. Often ...
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6answers
126 views

Is there an expression for when you have something but cannot use it

Is there an expression for when you have something but cannot use it or it is meaningless to use it. For example "one has the right to strike but cannot use it".
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4answers
366 views

If an adult gets kidnapped, would it still be considered “kid”napping? [duplicate]

What's the other terms if adults get kidnap?
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3answers
52 views

How to express this statement better - ill toward

We have this paragraph here: The forum is here for collectors of all persuasions, so unless you're in a thread specifically geared towards comparison/discussion, keep your ill toward comments ...
0
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1answer
77 views

work 'at' the weekends or work 'during' the weekends? [closed]

I wrote "Many college students work at the weekends." My colleague changed 'at' to 'during' = Many college students work during the weekends. Do you feel there is a difference, however subtle?
0
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1answer
80 views

“So though” vs “so even though”

Do they mean the same? Or they mean slightly different things? Example: They both had passion for music, so, (even) though their tastes differed, they never ran out of topic to talk about.
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3answers
106 views

People who use “no” in every sentence [closed]

I want to know whether using unnecessary "No"s and negations paints individuals with a negative/insulting attitude. Examples from my dear workplace. Example 1: 1: "Hey Eric, today is so warm." 2: ...
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2answers
56 views

How to introduce two arguments

How to introduce two arguments in a scientific paper? I used: There are two arguments. On the one hand ARGUMENT1. On the other hand ARGUMENT2. Now I was told I should not use this construct unless ...
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4answers
73 views

Phrase to tell, that you have written a fast note

I am choosing a title for my essay, which is about a man, who wrote a fast idea on a napkin and lost in a pocket of his jacket. Then he dies in a car accident and ten years later his son finds an old ...
0
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2answers
104 views

To or For? What's the rule? [closed]

As an ESL learner I always mess up using prepositions. It’s been especially difficult to understand when to use to or for. Are there any rules about this usage?
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2answers
105 views

What does 'to be maxed out' mean?

I want to understand what Chandler means when he says he's maxed out after thinking he's embarrassed by his bunny costume.
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1answer
194 views

The person who marries for money usually earns every penny of it

The person who marries for money usually earns every penny of it. ...anonymous quote. What does this phrase mean? It seems to suggest that if you marry for money, you will earn all of the money ...
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4answers
81 views

How do I pluralize the coffee drink “shot in the dark”?

For those that do not know, there is a coffee drink that it sometimes called a shot in the dark. It consists of an espresso shot poured in a regular cup of Joe. Suppose that I would like to order two ...
0
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2answers
101 views

What does absent fraud mean? [duplicate]

I came across the phrase absent fraud in this article. I searched for its meaning on Google but didn't find anything. What does absent fraud mean? I can’t help but empathize with an employee ...
3
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6answers
176 views

Word for lack of comprehension of something easy to comprehend

So, I was watching this Vsauce youtube video, which discusses Déjà vu, Presque vu, and Jamais vu. Now, all three concepts are something I'm aware of and have experienced, but it made me think of ...
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2answers
115 views

What's it called when one is so familiar with a language that phrases just “sound” right or wrong?

Native speakers, especially those who have read a lot of writing or literature for a given language, acquire the ability to "know" whether something is grammatically correct (or not) just from their ...
3
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5answers
180 views

What words or idioms are there for “beneficial constructive distraction that would establish or facilitate balance”?

What words are there for beneficial constructive distraction from a task that would improve the results or establish or facilitate balance among various tasks (all being a "distraction" in that ...
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2answers
939 views

How to understand 'flatter to deceive'?

How should you understand the expression: "flatter to deceive"? The Oxford Dictionaries defines flatter to deceive as: Appear promising but ultimately disappoint. Which is all nice and ...
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6answers
1k views

Is there a word to describe someone who is always defeated at my hand?

If A always defeats B, A is B's nemesis. If B always loses to his rival A, B is A's ____?
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1answer
35 views

Is there another way of saying “opener” as in the one who does the opening prayer in a devotion?

Another term for saying "Opener" in a Christian devotion.
0
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1answer
50 views

What are the correct form of the following 2 expressions

I am working on a simple application which predicts you the wake up time if you go to bed at the moment. In example: if you go to bed at 12am and set your alarm, you should set your alarm to 8am. Is ...
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2answers
71 views

Is the term “fresh and original” redundant?

I see this phrase all over the place. Fresh in this usage appears to be in the usage: not previously known or used; new or different. And directly lists original as a synonym. And original in ...
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3answers
187 views

What is another way to say the need for? [closed]

What is another way to say "the need for" in regards to mental health system reform
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3answers
80 views

“Try me”: Too Sexually Suggestive and “Slangy” for Retail Marketing?

Is the expression “Try Me” inappropriately sexually suggestive and “slangy” for use in retail marketing? A client wants an expression for use on a sticker for an electronic device in a retail store ...
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2answers
90 views

usage of the verb to bridge in “Bridging someone to something”

My friend suggested a tag line for our project: "Bridging you to your dream higher education online" and I have doubts that "bridging you to smth." is a proper word usage. I've never heard this ...
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5answers
3k views

Is there a non-romantic phrase for missing someone? [closed]

The phrase "I miss you" can be equivocal: suggestive of (a) romantic longing and/or (b) regret of loss. Certainly, context can shape its meaning, including geography, historical period, and the ...
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2answers
45 views

Is “on-parade” an actual term?

A google search came up with almost nothing. Am I just imaging things? I could have sworn one could use the term "on-parade" to mean a succession of something. For example: Life is an on-parade of ...
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3answers
82 views

How to verbalize a mathematics expression in English?

How do we express a simple mathematics equation in a way that could be understood by most people bad in mathematics? I have a formula like this: Processing Fee = Base Fee x ( Your Bid / Original ...
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1answer
61 views

When did “out of” come to mean “in”?

When I was a child, I learned that the term "out of" could be used to apply to a person or thing to describe where he, she or it was from. For example, a ship docked in Miami could be described as ...
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1answer
42 views

“delivered effort” versus “deliberate effort”

If someone has written, "a delivered effort to do something," is it a typo where the intended word was "deliberate" or is it its own turn of phrase?
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1answer
841 views

Difference between “I will call you” and “I give you a call”?

What is the difference between I will call you and I give you a call?
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5answers
600 views

Origin of the phrase “mother's ruin”?

I was under the impression that the phrase "mother's ruin" came from the England in the 1800's, where many people living in London did so in absolute poverty, and gin (the so-called "mother's ruin") ...
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3answers
58 views

A Replacement for “Free tour guide”

In France, there are people who welcome tourists into cities in a free manner, where said tourists do not need to pay for a guided visit around town, who are introduced to the local scene without ...
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4answers
105 views

A better statment for “Get back to me” [closed]

I would like to know if there is a better statement for expressing the following statement in an email, "Please get back to me if you have any query".
0
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2answers
90 views

to be above board

I have made 2-year apprenticeship as a multilingual correspondent. One expression that I came across but is still unclear to me is: "to be above board" or "He is above board" I have looked it up on ...
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1answer
313 views

What does “where's waldo” mean in this context?

The student thinks that he can where's waldo their way to the answer Now, does it mean it's gonna be a cinch or a sisyphean task? Again, if I add a little detail, The student thinks that he ...
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3answers
92 views

Principle Of Life

Hi guys I want to understand what is meant by this expression: I often asked myself, did the principle of life proceed? This sentence came in the following context: When I had arrived at ...
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2answers
127 views

Is there more than a 'double' whammy?

I have three (could grow to be more) bad reasons for a situation and I wondered if there is such a thing as a triple whammy that is an extension of the double whammy. From my research online, a triple ...
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2answers
43 views

Suitable expression for value in defeat?

When someone loses a match, I want to tell him that this loss can make him strong, that in the end this will help him to be a winner. Is there any expression in English for defeat is the ...
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2answers
60 views

Succinct way to describe “clocking in” page on a web app

A Swedish colleague has asked for my suggestion for web app page titles. The task has left me and a fellow native speaker stumped... The answers should apply to British and American English. A page ...
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8answers
4k views

How to describe a guy who is popular with girls?

Perhaps I should make it clear: - He naturally attracts girls. - He doesn't chase girls and have no intention for any relationship. - You just see him often together with girls.
0
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1answer
40 views

At the beginning of “The hands of Mr. Ottermole” by Thomas Burke, an expression 'discolored themselves', which I can't simply understand

Murder (said old Quong)—oblige me by passing my pipe—murder is one of the simplest thing in the world to do. Killing a man is a much simpler matter than killing a duck. Not always so safe, perhaps, ...
0
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3answers
184 views

A more formal way of saying “pointing out”

The goal of an edge detection algorithm is identifying pixels that belong to an edge of an object in an image ... The rest of the sentence should say something along the lines of "and point ...
7
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2answers
438 views

What's the term for expressions like “man's man” or “lawyer's lawyer”?

To indicate an exemplar or someone well-respected within their own group or occupation, sometimes you see expressions like "man's man" or "lawyer's lawyer." Is there a name for this construction? ...
0
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2answers
443 views

Knocked up, two very different meanings. But why and how did the phrase split? [duplicate]

In American English, "Knocked up" means "pregnant." I just found out via an article regarding jobs that no longer exist that in British English, they use use the phrase "Knocked up in a completely ...
0
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1answer
295 views

Bora Bora, Here We Come

Saw this phrase/expression in CIBC advertisement. The pleased client asked, "should we re-investment or expand", and the bank clerk said, "you can do both", then the old lady in the back happily ...
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6answers
2k views

What's a “brace” in the expression “brace yourself”? [closed]

I know the meaning of the expression, "brace yourself," and also the meaning of the word "brace" but I don't understand why they have that word in that expression and what its origin or history is. ...
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2answers
323 views

What does “Bunk over” mean?

Here ia a quote from The Avengers, 2012 film. Stark : The next building is gonna say "Potts" on the tower. Pepper : On the lease. Stark : Call your mom. Can you bunk over? Q. "The building is ...