Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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18
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11answers
3k views

Are there any similar phrases that are popular in the US to express “penny dropped”?

I met the phrase penny dropped today and learned that it is mainly used in UK. The Cambridge Idioms Dictionary via TheFreeDictionary.com defines it as if you say the penny drops, you mean that ...
1
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1answer
120 views

What is the exact definition of the expression 'A Rat's Chance'? [closed]

I started to learn English. Watching series like popular 'The X-Files' etc is very useful. In the 6th episode of the 10th season I found the expression 'A rat's chance'. What does it mean?
1
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0answers
191 views

I need help with the usage of “as he would say”. Should there be a period after penny and should “T” be capital in “The day”? [closed]

Another significant person who played a major role in redefining the word perseverance was my instructor from Ducat. “Spend a single day without your parent’s financial support and try to earn ...
1
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1answer
87 views

Does “there's more to come” require a past tense after it? [closed]

I wrote the following phrase: There's more to come once this pull request get merged (a pull request is something that can be merged) I saw on various places people using There's more to come ...
0
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1answer
165 views

Is the expression “to get understood” correct?

Can I say Get yourself understood. with the sense of "make yourself understood"? Are both correct? Is there a difference in meaning between the two?
1
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2answers
197 views

How to tell someone (in a funny way) that you are aware that you are (too) emotive while talking about an issue?

How would you tell (briefly) the person you are talking with when you are flooded with emotions —in a funny way—, that: you are aware of these sign, and you find it embarrassing you don’t take your ...
0
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0answers
166 views

Is the phrase “out of home” meaning “not at home” correct?

I've run across this phrase "someone is out of home most of the day" meaning "they are not home most of the day" several times. Is it correct and common way of saying "I'm not home often"? Example: ...
1
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3answers
105 views

forget or forget about?

Apart from the difference between forget it and forget about it, what do you forget and what do you forget about? Do you forget a face, someone's birthday or your date who is waiting for you? Do ...
3
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2answers
81 views

How to use “continued” at a bottom of a page?

I have several written papers, jumping from one topic to another, and I want to connect some of them by indicating that an argument will be deeply exposed elsewhere in the text. What I want to write ...
1
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0answers
40 views

Where does “for the same” come from? [closed]

I have noticed the expression "for the same" being used a lot by some people who speak English natively but are (possibly) from Nepal, Pakistan or maybe India. I have never heard this being used in ...
3
votes
1answer
56 views

Is there a term for the point in time when a product can begin to use itself?

I know there is the term "dogfooding" and have even found other variations on the phrase "... eat our own dog food": "drinking our own champaign" "eating our own cooking" "ice cream our customers ...
2
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2answers
62 views

Is there always a difference between 'is the' and 'is a'?

For instance, 'every dog owner is the friend of a dog owner' vs 'every dog owner is a friend of a dog owner'. For me, the former seems to imply that every dog owner is the friend of a particular dog ...
0
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1answer
145 views

“Have ever eaten” or “Ever ate”

I'd like to express that the steak I had (last Sunday) was the best one I have ever eaten. Is "Have ever eaten" correct or do I have to use the past simple "I ever ate", since the process (of eating) ...
17
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4answers
1k views

What is the origin of the idiom “To Stand Someone Up”?

I was curious as to if anyone knew of the origins of the idiom "to stand someone up" in the sense of: My date stood me up. Do you think he'll stand us up again? She stood me up last night. ...
1
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1answer
60 views

what does “showing the fly the way out of the fly-bottle” literally means?

I saw this expression: "the aim of the activity is "to show the fly the way out of the fly-bottle". " (It is connected with this other expression: "I don't know my way about".) I grasped the ...
0
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0answers
33 views

Australian English for items that are discounted, on sale, or on clearance?

US English user looking for help with AusE. How would you describe to a friend something you bought that was on sale, discounted, or on clearance? Would it be with those terms, or variations on those ...
1
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1answer
47 views

A word or a phrase for this logical fallacy [closed]

What is another word or phrase for when someone tries to dismiss an argument by simply claiming it is extreme, without offering any evidence or counterargument?
1
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2answers
53 views

How to express the fact that clauses in a compound logical statement are connected by “AND”?

Say, I have three independent logical clauses, a, b, and c, and they are connected into one logical statement (a∧b∧c). How do I express this succinctly? Can I say, "a, b, and c are connected ...
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1answer
74 views

meaning of “maybe she did see” [closed]

what is the difference between: maybe she did see and maybe she saw is it a grammatical usage of maybe?
0
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1answer
73 views

meaning of “As if I don't have enough to worry about”

As if I don't have enough to worry about without my youngest making up such things. I understand this meaning: without my children making problems, I have nothing to worry about. am I right?
1
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1answer
40 views

The middle of obscuring and appreciating positive psychology

I am examining characters who have ideologies or outlooks that lead or obscure appreciation of the attributes of positive psychology. Within the spectrum of both, what do you call the middle person ...
1
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2answers
150 views

“If, however in advance one has knowledge…” vs “However, if in advance one has knowledge…”

I am trying to write a paper and and I am not sure of the correct phrasing of a particular sentence. Here is what I am currently using If, however, in advance one has knowledge of the material ...
20
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4answers
4k views

Common expression for having a rich man's taste but a poor man's budget?

What is the common expression for having a rich person's taste and poor person's budget?
0
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3answers
113 views

Is it okay to say “Your explanation really solved my concerns" [closed]

Is it okay to say “You explanation really solved my concerns"? What are other ways to express this? Thank you!
5
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2answers
69 views

Why does the word “be” change so much?

In the phrase make <someone> {adjective}, it implies changing that person's emotion, but make <someone> be {adjective} implies forcing that person to comply. Why does the word "be", which ...
2
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3answers
128 views

Believe it or not [closed]

Shouldn't "believe it or not" be "believe it or don't?" I do not see the word "not" being used like that elsewhere.
10
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5answers
336 views

Your Mileage May Vary [closed]

In the United States we have a saying, "your mileage may vary", which means "your experience may be different". In English-speaking countries that don't use Imperial miles, is there an equivalent ...
27
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4answers
5k views

Word meaning: A slip of the tongue which suggests how you actually feel, often humorous

I'm sure there's a word which matches this definition. Where you make a slight mistake in saying something and a friend will nudge you and say "oh, so that's what you really think?!" One example, ...
0
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2answers
126 views

What is meant by “still alive in kicking”? [closed]

Today I'd like to ask about an expression I heard on Youtube. I couldn't hear it clearly but a comedian said "He was still alive in kicking" (<-- this part is what I am not sure about) The story ...
2
votes
2answers
86 views

He makes a right turn to the corner vs. He makes a right turn at the corner

I wonder what's the difference between "make a right turn to the corner" and "make a right turn at the corner." My teachers could hardly explain why the former one is wrong, and I only ...
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1answer
42 views

The word landscape as modifying a head noun

I want to use landscape experience in sentences contrasting it with aesthetic experience and spatial experience . The term landscape though is commonly taken as a noun. How could I indicate that I ...
1
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1answer
93 views

Hangin' on a string / You've got me hangin' on a string now

There's a song from the 80's whose title is "Hangin' on a string" (By Loose Ends). The singer keeps singning "You've got me hangin' on a string now". I wonder what it means exactly (You keep me ...
0
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1answer
94 views

What is generally considered the youngest age at which it's normal to call a girl a “young woman”? [closed]

It would obviously be ridiculous to call a 6-year old girl a young woman. What's the youngest age when it's no longer weird to call a girl that?
7
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1answer
798 views

When expressing temperatures that are colder than freezing, do we say “more than freezing”, “less than freezing”, or something else?

So my brother and I were standing out in the cold. Brother: "Man, it's cold." Me: "Yeah, it's freezing." Brother: "Man, it's more than freezing!" Me: Slightly confused, but perhaps thinking that he ...
3
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4answers
80 views

Meaningless Choice [duplicate]

What's a name for a meaningless choice? A choice that has no effect on outcome. Something similar to a phrase like "pyrrhic victory".
5
votes
10answers
1k views

How would you eloquently say “doing something for the umpteenth/nth/n-tieth time”?

I want to say that someone was doing (something) for the N-tieth time in a row, but in a way that emphasises both that this action is performed again, after a substantial amount of times (successfully,...
0
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1answer
49 views

Is this correct? : “Tenji that was, died in his sisters arms.” (Kind of like 'powers that be') Also is 'have a claim to' correct' or 'hold a claim to'

Full quote for context "I have no claim to life, yet I walk. I have no claim to valor, yet I fight. I have no claim to love, yet I mourn. I am not the dragon, for Tenji Minamoto that was, died in his ...
5
votes
1answer
363 views

“Nothing particular” versus “Nothing in particular”

What is the difference between "Nothing particular" and "Nothing in particular"? I have been told that "Nothing particular" is grammatically incorrect and that "Nothing in particular" should be used ...
0
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2answers
66 views

“I was beside myself” [closed]

I have heard this phrase many times from people describing anguish, hysteria, or just plain being upset with some event in their lives. What is the correct definition and examples of it's use?
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1answer
37 views

Usage of the expression “ad nauseum”

I would like to know if the expresssion can be used commonly or whether it would sound affected or out of place if not used in the appropriate context.
0
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2answers
643 views

“Of course not” or “of course no”?

I'm not a native English speaker, and I've heard this from a teacher of mine who is not a native speaker either. Is it correct to say "Of course no"?
0
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1answer
58 views

What does “It is warmer on the peaks than those in the valleys will ever know” mean?

I was looking for a phrase to put at the end of a worksheet just as a nice to have for the students when they were doing work and I came across the phrase: "It is warmer on the peaks than those in ...
0
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1answer
36 views

Is the sentence correct? [closed]

In China, the incidence of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is increasing by 5 percents every year, which is the fastest rising cancer in digestive tract.
0
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1answer
157 views

similar between or similar for?

For a research project I have a question about the correctness of the following phrases The mean activities were similar between group A and group B. The study demonstrated similarity in terms of ...
14
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1answer
2k views

Meaning of “Carrots aren't that great” in the sentence

I was reading "10 hurdles to Windows 10 adoption". In slide 12, there's this paragraph: I still think it’s smartest for Windows 7 customers to stand pat, unless they see something in Windows 10 ...
0
votes
1answer
278 views

Is “negotiation room” a correct expression?

Is "negotiation room" a correct expression? I'd like to use it in a sentence such as "there is still some room for negotiation on the terms and conditions." The idea is to show that we are still open ...
1
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2answers
58 views

Is it “the book that influences me most” or “the book that influences me the most”?

I'm not sure whether a "the" should be added before the "most" in this phrase. Or are they both OK but have different meaning?
1
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0answers
117 views

A word for saying exactly what you meant/wanted to

It seems to me that I've heard it before but it escapes me.. If I remember correctly the definition is relating to 'saying exactly the right thing at the right time' 'saying exactly what you meant ...
4
votes
2answers
120 views

I'm looking for a word that describes that moment you feel overwhelmed by the beauty and grandeur of nature

I was on a mountain the other day and had a moment where I just had to stop and take it all in. I felt insignificant (in the best way) and just stopped to admire where I was. The closest words I could ...
0
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0answers
165 views

“in a * perspective” or “from a * perspective”

Which is correct: "in a * perspective" or "from a * perspective"? So for example "Growing cucumber in a mathematical perspective" or "Growing cucumber from a mathematical perspective". Thanks, ...