Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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2
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0answers
37 views

What is an alternative expression to “minority and women ran businesses”? [closed]

I'm looking for another way to say minority and women ran businesses
-1
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5answers
137 views

Is there a word for tremendous happiness coupled with relief?

I'm looking for a single word that would describe the feeling of say, getting a happy ending at the end of a tragic movie--like 'glad', but stronger. Feels like it exists but I just can't recall ...
3
votes
2answers
52 views

“That's just part of it” vs “that's just a part of it”

Which version is more correct/common? Example: Speaker A: Why did you leave the party? Because some guys made fun of you? Speaker B: Just (a) part of it. Speaker A: What's the other? ...
16
votes
8answers
3k views

Why do we 'cut' a deal?

I hired a private detective to see if I could cut a deal In the above sentence, why do we cut a deal? Should I replace it with make a deal? Is it a popular idiom in the native English world?
2
votes
2answers
302 views

What do you call a “schizophrenia attack”?

Attack as in panic attack. I don't know the term for it.
0
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3answers
50 views

How can I describe the status which indicates that it's not the time to start the scheduled task

Suppose there is a task scheduled to be started at 15:00, and now it's 14:50. How can I describe this status which indicates that it's not the time to start the scheduled task, and still need to await ...
1
vote
2answers
71 views

What word describes the relationship between words like “art” and “artist?”

An example sentence: The word "art," and its ______ "artist," are used too liberally in our culture. I suppose "derivative" would work there but I'm wondering if there's a more specific one. ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Usage of “brought from”

I've come across this sentence: A sudden rap at the door **brought her from** her reverie. I think it should have been written as: A sudden rap at the door **brought her back from** her ...
1
vote
1answer
118 views

Is 'getting more used to' bad use of english? [closed]

Is it correct to say 'She is getting more used to me visiting'? I am just wondering about the use of 'more'.
2
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4answers
112 views

Break the awkwardness

I was wondering if it is okay to use "break the awkwardness" in place of "break the silence" or "break the ice" to describe an action leading to a social interchange/conversation. If not, then what ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

All's okay except when you make a little mistake [duplicate]

What's this situation called when you work at a place where you are never appreciated for what you do until one particular day you forget to do something which attracts all the negative sentiments ...
0
votes
0answers
111 views

How to use “have an impact”?

I was wondering whether saying "have an impact" instead of "have an impact on" is idiomatically correct. "He aspired to have an impact through education and hard work."
3
votes
3answers
162 views

Where does “X-factor” meaning: “noteworthy, special talent or quality” come from?

X-factor refers to: a noteworthy special talent or quality, or a variable in a given situation that could have the most significant impact on the outcome: (ODO) The first ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

Is there an expression for cutting ties or calling off something that is ultimately unfavorable to both parties?

In particular, ending something that one of the parties is still attached to. For instance, in a relationship, if one person doesn't want to go through the short term struggle of a breakup (and is ...
4
votes
2answers
116 views

A single idiom or phrase that means “ I didn't feel sleepy anymore”

Is there any idiom/phrase that convey this meaning: "someone or something caused me not to feel sleepy anymore at a specific moment or situation"? Please read these scenarios: Last night ​​I was ...
1
vote
2answers
67 views

What is a shaggy-dog story? [closed]

Can anybody help me to explain the meaning of this sentence, i dont understand its meaning, it's about when Andrew Marr (a Historian) make a conclusion about History of the World, he concluded about ...
2
votes
4answers
113 views

Animal-related alternatives to the 'black swan' expression

I am looking for animal-based alternate expressions to the 'black swan' for a rare event (or a rare item, even though that's not precisely what black swan signifies). I believe I have heard other ...
0
votes
1answer
105 views

Solely interested in mindless social fun

Is there a word for a person who is solely interested in mindless social fun? A junior I know told me that EL&U is stressful because it's full of "serious"(lack of a better word here) people, of ...
0
votes
2answers
56 views

How to use “ the look of confusion” in a sentence?

Can you say "I saw the look of confusion on Max." or do you have to say "I saw the look of confusion on Max's face." ?
0
votes
0answers
29 views

“communicative support” or “communicative media” or …?

How would you say if you are working (at the same time) on a book, a video documentary, website and periodical publication. I'm looking for a short term that would summarize this activity. what ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

Is “strong medicine” idiomatic?

Is the expression “strong medicine” idiomatic? I am referring to drugs that contain a high concentration of chemicals and are used for soothing severe pains or treating severe diseases. A drug whose ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

What's a word that means or historic character who sybolizes a spy whose own lack of knowledge reveals his subterfuge?

The context is a spy who becomes revealed to the person who is spied upon because the spy lacks knowledge of the target's (the spied upon's) specialty work
1
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2answers
53 views

Single word expression for pre-test activities

Is there a single word or expression for all the tests/checks done before doing the actual task? The context is to describe the tests that are performed to check the safety and other operational ...
0
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0answers
28 views

Armor glistening like glass in Chapman's Homer

I am trying to recover a lovely phrase that I only dimly remember. I think that it's in Chapman's Homer. I think that it's a simile: someone's armor or shield (perhaps Agamemnon's) "glistens like ...
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votes
1answer
116 views

An idiom or an expression to describe a worthwhile investment [closed]

Let's say we have a single mom with three kids (aged 6 to 8), who all want bikes. Our mom loves her kids, but she also has to be frugal. She doesn't think it's smart to get them brand-new bikes as ...
5
votes
9answers
155 views

phrase request-Talking in completely irrelevant terms to cover up one's lack of knowledge

Imagine the following scenario: Charlie walks into a chess club, where Alice and Bob are playing a casual chess game. Alice: Hi Charlie, do you think I should move the rook or the bishop? Charlie: ...
1
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1answer
122 views

What do the parents of the married children call each other? As in, the mother of the bride to the mother of the groom?? Is there a word? Or phrase?

Looking for an expression that would describe the relationship between the two mothers of their married children
2
votes
1answer
40 views

Frankly, so far, so dull?

I dont understand this expression 'Frankly, so far, so dull' in this paragraph: 'When his father died, he slaughtered his brothers to capture the throne. He then invaded the neighbouring state of ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

“Thank you in advance” [closed]

I often get messages that end in "thank you in advance". Is it a recent trend or is it my imagination? This expression strikes me as misused in many situations. One example was a recent post on ...
1
vote
6answers
71 views

Expression for having one's enthusiasm killed [duplicate]

Let's say we have someone who is really energetic and excited about a task they are doing, and then something happens (or someone says something), that totally takes the excitement out of the task ...
4
votes
6answers
349 views

“adjusting glasses”?

What is the idiomatic way to describe an action by which a person puts their eyeglasses back if they are a bit off down the nose (and does that often as a habitual unconscious move)? (I mean ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

To give somebody the jiffies [closed]

I heard this expression from somewhere (possibly from a movie or tv series), in a form like "this thing gives me the jiffies!" and I understood it to mean "it disturbs/scares me", similar to "gives me ...
0
votes
1answer
160 views

draw my attention/ catches my eye/ attracts my attention

Can I use the three phrases in the title interchangeably? For example: The woman in the tight black dress definitely draws my attention/ catches my eye/ attracts my attention.
0
votes
3answers
67 views

How do I emphasize his superiority?

A boy(3 years) I saw in a fun-fair was trying to play in mickey mouse bounce house(precisely speaking clambering a steep slope) suitable for kids older than him, say more than 5 years. I am trying to ...
0
votes
1answer
131 views

Is “our friends” being used sarcastically here?

Generally speaking when we say "our friend" we are referring to someone who is a friend of ours. However, I have noticed that at times these words are used sarcastically to refer to someone who is ...
2
votes
3answers
98 views

Does “started a start-up company” contain redundancy?

I see the phrase "started a start-up company" more and more these days, and feel that it is redundant, and the speaker is ignorant or using stock phrases without thinking. Any company we start would ...
1
vote
2answers
763 views

“Going down the rathole” vs. “Going down the rabbit hole.”

I hear/read the phrase "going down a/the rathole" used as a synonym for the phrase "going down a/the rabbit hole," the later taken from chapter 1 - "Down the Rabbit Hole" of Alice's Adventures in ...
0
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0answers
30 views

“to keep priorities” - must add “straight” or equivalent?

Does it make sense to say "a person must keep priorities", or must I add "straight/ intact/ in line" or anything else after "priorities"? Thanks! edited - I would still like to know if the above ...
12
votes
14answers
2k views

Common phrase for “to name the issue exactly”

I'm looking for an expression/phrase which is common for when in a discussion somebody points to the exact issue / cause of the problem or named an argument which corresponds perfectly to your own ...
0
votes
4answers
105 views

Is there an epistemological word that means “one who solicits prostitutes”?

I'm not certain that I'm phrasing my question correctly, but I couldn't think of a better way to word it. What I'm asking is for a word that truly defines to mean a person who solicits prostitutes. ...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

What does the phrase “you are in the swamps” mean?

Generally speaking when someone says "you are in the swamps", what do they really mean to say? In other words in what kind of situation would someone use this phrase? EDIT: In response to a comment ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Is “hats-led society” grammatically correct and does it convey the right message?

It's a strange phrase indeed. It's from a foreign phrase. There's a period where a slogan "hats lead the society to become a superpower" was in effect. *Edit I think I should have given historical ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

'It is no secret': neutral style or not?

My recent assignment was to write an essay using a template my teacher had given me. The essay was supposed to begin with a phrase like 'It is common knowledge that' or 'there is no denying that', but ...
0
votes
0answers
74 views

Is it acceptable to say “He is the best lawyer, bar none” and add “no pun intended”

I would like to know if it is OK to say "He is a topnotch lawyer, bar none - no pun intended" as part of my review to my lawyer.
2
votes
3answers
84 views

Alternative term for “recover” in case of trivial problems

Normally after we get rid of a severe disease, we use the term 'recover'. I just recovered from Cancer or Tuberculosis. If it was just a trivial headache/cold, how would we say it? I just ___ ...
2
votes
1answer
167 views

Can a person be “overly literal”

It's common to say someone is being overly literal if their interpretation of a phrase is too strictly literal either intentionally (nitpickers) or unintentionally (people learning another language). ...
-1
votes
3answers
271 views

Synonym for “issues arose” [closed]

What is another way to say "Issues arose", as in "Some issues arose during the testing phase of the project."
0
votes
1answer
381 views

“I'm putting you on notice.” Proper phrase? [duplicate]

I'm trying to construct a phrase that has the meaning of informing someone they are deficient and hereby directed to correct the deficiency. They type of thing a supervisor would say to a chronic ...
1
vote
3answers
82 views

Another phrase for 'the same as'

What is another phrase that could be used to replace 'the same as'? To be used in a sentence such as: He was walking around the area, the same as everyone else.
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votes
2answers
421 views

What does 'throw the bum out' mean? [closed]

I want to know what these expressions mean. Let's throw the bum out Throw the bum out attitude