Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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Is there an equivalent of the spanish “que hueva” slang expression in English to denote that you feel lazy about doing something?

In Spanish slang, particularly in the west, the expressions "que hueva" or "me da hueva" are used, respectively, to convey that you are lazy about doing something. The context might be as follows: A: ...
11
votes
6answers
28k views

Phrase to say that something which happened twice already is likely to happen again

In French, there is the expression "jamais deux sans trois" (literally: "never twice without a third [time]"). We use it to express that something which has already happened twice is likely to happen ...
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2answers
4k views

expression “something beyond your kin” [closed]

I heard the expression "something is beyond your kin", see an example: Woman, you're playing with forces beyond your kin. I can't find a way to fit any of the entries of the definition of 'kin' ...
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2answers
4k views

what phrase to use to convey the idea of “my first attempt”

I had tried photography as serious hobby for the first time and I have made an album. I want to expresses the idea to the world that this is my first attempt. Few things come to my mind like "my first ...
0
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2answers
143 views

Which sounds better: “What’s in ――” or “What’s on――”?

I’m making the title of a web page with classifieds, and I’d like to name it either “What’s in (town name)” or “What’s on (town name)”. Which one sounds better for a town classified web page? Right ...
7
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2answers
273 views

Rationale for expression “Fixer-upper”

I have encountered the expression fixer-upper: A fixer-upper is a real-estate property that will require maintenance work (redecoration, reconstruction or redesign) though it usually can be ...
18
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10answers
31k views

Is there a word to describe someone who often inaccurately uses words?

Or a word to describe the act of inaccurately using complicated or unusual words (often in an attempt to sound more intelligent)? I considered 'bombastic' but it doesn't have that quality of ...
6
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1answer
472 views

Implication(s) of “Though you wouldn't think it”

(This question arose because on some other SE many of us tried to translate this expression. It turns out it was not so easy, and it would certainly help if we had a better grasp on it.) I believe ...
5
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2answers
10k views

Origin of “pull your socks up”?

I was pulling my socks up this morning, in the literal sense of the term, when I started to wonder about why pull your socks up came to mean what it does:- to make an effort to improve your work ...
4
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3answers
20k views

What is the meaning of the phrase “moving the needle”?

Here is the context: The network has geographically distributed upload endpoints, featuring end-to-end encryption as well as patent-pending routing and optimization technology, letting Box process ...
2
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2answers
208 views

Why the discrepancy between number and case in (some) British English?

By chance, I've heard a lot of Midlands English in the last few weeks, and have noticed this sort of disconnect: "It cost me five pound" (rather than 'pounds'); "The ball rolled ten foot" (rather than ...
21
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4answers
66k views

What is the difference between “here we go” and “there we go”?

As a non-native speaker, I cannot grasp any difference between the expressions "here we go" and "there we go": both expressions seem to underline an event that is going to happen immediately. Is ...
3
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3answers
171 views

“Strikes me a great deal” in a negative way

Is it correct to use "Strikes me a great deal to connotes a negative feeling? The rude behavior of the officer struck me a great deal. I didn't expect this from a professional person.
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2answers
4k views

Expression for “someone who's clueless of their surroundings”?

What is an expression or saying you could use to describe someone that is totally clueless of their surroundings?
21
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2answers
790 views

Is there a name for this method of writing that includes pictograms?

I've seen people write (usually in a humorous way) a 'code-like' message where parts of words are replaced with a pictogram that sounds like that word-part. E.G.: (eyeball) (tin can)(rope knot) ...
8
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4answers
9k views

Origin of “they don't know they're born”?

Practising today for my forthcoming role as radgie gadgie, I was having a little rant about modern youth: "they don't know they're born!" This seems to me rather a strange phrase to describe someone ...
8
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6answers
1k views

What metaphor do countries that don't play baseball use for intercourse?

Related question: In sex talk, how many bases are there and what do they all mean? There are lots of English-speaking (or English-learning) countries where baseball simply isn't played much if at ...
2
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2answers
85 views

Is “auditory aid” correct when talking about helping someone through audio signals?

I'm not talking about the concept of a "hearing aid" (those little things you put in your ears). I'm talking about sounds like the ones emitted by traffic lights, letting us know they've turned green....
2
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1answer
1k views

“We strongly advise you to enjoy this book before turning to the Introduction”

This was part of General Introduction (it's right before the Introduction) of some Wordsworth Classics series, We strongly advise you to enjoy this book before turning to the Introduction. ...
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5answers
9k views

Using “to my mind”

English is not my native language. I am curious about the usage of "to my mind". Is it a British English phrase? Is it used in American English? Is it formal/informal? I've found an interesting ...
0
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1answer
2k views

“Pain in the neck” and similar expressions [closed]

Are there any other expressions equivalent in meaning to "pain in the neck" that mention another part of the body (e.g, "pain in the ass")? How would you rate each of those expressions (including the ...
3
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2answers
30k views

Me too or I as well [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it correct to use “me too” and “I too”? Which one is correct to use Me too or I as well? For example - Suppose my friend says I want to go there ...
7
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2answers
10k views

Is “Better never than late” the saying as popular as “Better late than never”?

There was the following sentence in Maureen Dowd’s column in New York Times (September 1): We all know Republicans prefer riches-to-riches sagas, and rounding up immigrants, if the parasitic ...
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8answers
3k views

Expression for a choice which isn't really one

What would be a nice short expression to describe a choice which isn't really one, in that all of its possible outcomes are ultimately equivalent despite being presented as different? My first ...
7
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2answers
207 views

Old (professional) Adam

Again, from Le Carré's Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy: [George Smiley] had schooled himself to admit that in those last wretched months of Control's career, when disasters followed one another with ...
2
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2answers
158 views

“Losing the semester” [closed]

Is the following expression common among native speakers: If you don't enroll now, there is a chance of losing the semester. Any better alternative?
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1answer
109 views

Express a phrase as compound [closed]

I need to express this phrase as a short compound to be used as programming variable name (this phrase is in the context of a software user interface): the block showing current chatters I have ...
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3answers
2k views

“For <xxx> sake” - which variant is more common?

There are a lot of variations of this phrase, most notably including "for God's sake" "for Heaven's sake" "for Jesus sake" "for Pete's sake" Which of those are most commonly used in modern English?...
8
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3answers
441 views

What does “Safety net in the coffin” mean?

There was the phrase “the safety net in the coffin” in reference to Mr. Paul Ryan, running mate of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney in Maureen Dowd’s article, titled “Cruel conservatives ...
5
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3answers
507 views

What does the cause for your feeling like “downing a quart of Red Bull” mean?

Again in the Time article (June 29),“Roberts Rules: What the Health Care decision means for the country” that many of my familiar ‘teachers’ criticized the style of writing as too pretentious and the ...
0
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3answers
6k views

How do I express “hope you become less busy” [closed]

I have a friend who works at law firm. I suggested to him to have dinner with my family this weekend but he told me that he just got staffed on an new thing that will have him working through the ...
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votes
1answer
807 views

What is the meaning of “I don't need no stinking counters”?

The context is this video at timeline 43:26 seconds . That's too fancy for me. I don't need no stinking counters. What does this mean? Is it an American or British expression?
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1answer
489 views

Why is the “round figure” of a person associated with being “comforting”? [closed]

Example: Miss Beam was all that I had expected middle-aged, authoritative, kindly, and understanding. Her hair was beginning to turn grey, and her round figure was likely to be comforting for a ...
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2answers
2k views

What does ‘It’s one thing to dance like Fred Astaire, but Ginger Rogers did it backwards’ mean as a metaphor to John Roberts' ruling?

There was the following sentence in June 29 issue of Time magazine titled “Roberts Rules: What the health care decision means for the country” dealing with Chief Justice of Supreme Court, John Roberts’...
0
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2answers
103 views

“fix me that account” or “fix that account for me”

Can we say "Did you fix me that account?" Or should it be "Did you fix that account for me?" assuming something is wrong with the account. Account represents a computer based system user id.
0
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1answer
2k views

“Blow your heads off ” or “blow your head off ”

Is it heads or head? Google told me both are okay. What do you think? I will blow your head[s] off if you don't tell me.
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3answers
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What nuance ‘I’ll leave it at that' carry? Does it mean total agreement with, or commitment to your partner?

Yesterday’s (August 22) Washington Times picked up the following quote of Mr. Paul Ryan in its “Today’s Quote” "Mitt Romney's going to be the president. The president sets the policy. His policy ...
7
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1answer
716 views

Is the expression “topping it the ______” really used anywhere?

I've often read books where English men made statements about others "topping it the knob" or "topping it the gentleman," which I took to mean over playing a role or attitude. Is this a legitimately ...
0
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3answers
260 views

Better phrase for “lengthy date” [closed]

Is there a better phrase or word to use than lengthy date? For example: We give this lengthy date to accommodate the dispute respecting the Hermas who is the author of the Pastor. This seems a ...
1
vote
2answers
629 views

Usage of the expression “go they went”

I noticed the usage of go they went in the TV show How I Met Your Mother: Marshall: Where are all my underpants? Lily: Did you check your suitcase? (Marshall checks his suitcase, gives a ...
2
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2answers
326 views

Expression: wanted the skinny on [closed]

Is there an expression like wanted the skinny on? I can hazard a guess on the meaning of the phrase but will be grateful if anyone can tell me the exact meaning. Here is the exact quote: I'm a ...
2
votes
2answers
187 views

“As old Buffle used to say”

In Chesteron's play Magic a character often uses a phrase such as “as old Buffle used to say” or variations thereof. Is this, or used it to be, a common phrase? Does it have a specific meaning or is ...
3
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2answers
2k views

What does “Drop and give me twenty, America’ in ‘Paul Ryan’s song of himself’ mean?

The New Yorker magazine August 16 issue carries the article under the title ‘Paul Ryan’s song of himself’ which is posted by Andy Borowitz. I as a non-native English language learner cannot tell ...
0
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3answers
2k views

“Walk my way” in the following

Can I use "walk my way" in the following situation: I had an argument with a bus driver about the elections, and she got really angry. So I had to get off the bus and walk my way.
5
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1answer
2k views

Origin of “on the up-and-up”

The phrase "on the up-and-up" means "legitimate" or "legal" or "reputable" or, to use another idiom, "above-board". For instance: Although Pete didn't look like a city official, Joe assumed his ...
8
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3answers
2k views

“for good” expression in an unfortunate event?

I just heard an expression while watching a TV series yesterday. Someone just died and they said: He is gone for good I googled it and found that "for good" means "forever" in this context. But ...
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4answers
317 views

What's the negative way of saying “I can only finish a small part of the jobs.”

What's the negative way of saying "I can only finish a small portion of the jobs." Is it "I cannot finish most of the jobs?" And I appreciate it if more "native" expressions are provided....
2
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3answers
2k views

Is “Please consider the seriousness of this offer” correct? [closed]

In Romanian language, there is an expression that would be translated to English as "I offer and request seriousness", that is usually used for example at the end of an offer/ad. What is the English ...
2
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2answers
2k views

What are some familiar expressions can I use to mean someone is lucky? [closed]

I am in a context where I would need a familiar (but not vulgar) short expression that means someone is lucky. Can someone help?
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2answers
776 views

expressions at bar about credit card payment

I went to the bar the other day and when I tried to pay for the drink by my credit card, the bartender asked me something to the effect whether I wanted to have my credit card open for further payment ...