Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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“Has much nature” or “is very green”

If we want to say that Our college has a lot of trees and flowers in a somewhat abstract manner, which is better? Our college has much nature. There is much nature in our college. ...
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1answer
2k views

Meaning of Lyrics in “Diamonds on the Inside” [closed]

In Ben Harper's song, "Diamonds on the Inside", there is a verse that goes She made herself a bed of nails, And shes plannin' on puttin' it to use. I don't quite understand its meaning, ...
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2answers
2k views

Etymology of “Scantily clad”

I'm aware of the meaning of "scantily clad", the internet gives some good clues on that (Side question: Does it have erotic implications in itself?). However, what do the actual words mean ("clad" ...
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1answer
29 views

What does “working out of” mean? [duplicate]

Can you please tell me what "working out of" means in this context? "African composers working out of European-based choral and instrumental art music traditions are gaining recognition, as are the ...
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2answers
46 views

What's the correct form?

Which is a correct answer? I'll be there in a ... time. A) day or two B) day or two's C) day's or two's
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2answers
53 views

What is the correct expression? [closed]

I am trying not to laugh. Can I say,"I am trying to keep my laughter away?"
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1answer
29 views

Has anyone heard the expression, to stack on a turn? [closed]

Has anyone heard the saying, to stack on a turn?
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1answer
87 views

What is generally considered the youngest age at which it's normal to call a girl a “young woman”? [closed]

It would obviously be ridiculous to call a 6-year old girl a young woman. What's the youngest age when it's no longer weird to call a girl that?
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2answers
199 views

“Of course not” or “of course no”?

I'm not a native English speaker, and I've heard this from a teacher of mine who is not a native speaker either. Is it correct to say "Of course no"?
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1answer
79 views

Is it a native way to say “I misremembered the time for the appointment”?

Is it a native way to say "I misremembered the time for the appointment"? Is therer any alternative way to express this meaning? Thank you!
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1answer
107 views

where does the phrase “all of a 2 'n 8” originate from?

where does the phrase "all of a 2 'n 8" originate from? It means - not knowing what to do - confused - unsettled
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3answers
102 views

'Go to sleep' vs 'Go and sleep'?

I just had a linguistics test (it's called UKLO) that measures you're ability to problem solve and translate languages you know nothing about. For one of my translation answers I wrote 'Don't go and ...
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1answer
74 views

Is there a word for “specify/determine something in terms of something else”?

I am attempting to translate a greek document and there is a concept that doesn't seem to translate to a given english word; one that I know at least. It more or less says: " Fiscus -a legal term- ...
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2answers
583 views

Replacement for “this means that …” [closed]

I often write texts where I offer an explanation of some issue followed by a paragraph discussing the implications for the reader. I generally start those paragraphs with "this means": [Longer ...
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1answer
57 views

Is the structure “This is because… and so…” grammatically correct?

For example, in the sentence: This is because he was smart, and he worked hard, and so he was very rich. Is this structure correct? If not, how can the sentence be corrected?
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2answers
40 views

Deal-killing surprise? [closed]

Origin : Communicate company’s positions completely and accurately to the Customer to avoid deal-killing surprises once Legal is engaged to support negotiations. Q: what does "deal-killing" mean?
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2answers
51 views

How to describe a request that I'd prefer to avoid

Hello dear linguistics, I am looking for a short phrase, a word if you may, that will describe the following: A request that I can fulfill but I am reluctant to as it involves some actions that I ...
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3answers
130 views

Stop chewing! What is it called when someone doesn't like the sound of other people eating?

My brother hates the sound of eating, chewing, slurping, swallowing etc. I am looking for either: The name of the condition or A word to describe the type of person who behaves like this
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1answer
102 views

Origin of “A pox/curse on both their houses”

Does anyone know the source of the expression (A pox, A curse) on both their houses. This is often associated with the end of Romeo and Juliet.
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1answer
37 views

Usage of “brought from”

I've come across this sentence: A sudden rap at the door **brought her from** her reverie. I think it should have been written as: A sudden rap at the door **brought her back from** her ...
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4answers
248 views

Phrase or way to say 'thought should be given' [closed]

Is there a better way to say 'thought should be given'? For example: Thought should be given as to how to decrease the deficit. What is a better way to say that?
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3answers
947 views

Phrases that mean “a really long time”? [closed]

I was telling my kids that sometimes there are many ways to say the same thing, especially with idiomatic phrases. I don't know why, but the simple phrase "a really long time" came to mind, and I ...
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1answer
105 views

“Hi animals” — a US expression?

today I got a meesage on facebook by a known guy to me, from US, and the message was like that Hi animals, what is the address to the place? So the question is, the Hi animals is it a kind of ...
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2answers
86 views

legal expression for “going insane” [closed]

in a company bylaws document, I'm trying to describe situations in which a the term of a company director can be ended. These include death, as well as "going insane" or "losing his mind" - but I'm ...
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1answer
59 views

What Is The Meaning 'I'm Not', is a lie

What is the meaning of these two sentences: The truth is, the belief 'I'm Not', is a lie. Before we ever agree to believe I'm Not, it was someone else's opinion. I tried my best but still ...
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1answer
102 views

Expression for asking about the material of a cloth in a store? [closed]

How do you ask about the material of a cloth when you go shopping?
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1answer
95 views

Phrase where you flip it and it means something else

In high school a while ago, I learned a bunch of random terms for words and phrases: synecdoche, antonym, oxymoron, palindrome, etc. There's one term that escapes me but I can give examples of it. ...
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1answer
150 views

Word or phrase meaning “making it uniquely mine”

What are words or phrases that describe choosing and/or adding features to a basic item that will transform it into a uniquely personal product. For example, offered a basic dress with a list of ...
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3answers
197 views

What does the phrase “Keep those cards and letters rolling in” actually mean?

How would I explain the following phrase/expression to an ESL learner? "Keep those cards and letters rolling in" I actually don't know where this comes from, or what it exactly means. Any help is ...
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1answer
104 views

What is this 'hammer'?

I keep on hearing people referring to the 'hammer' in the chat rooms, and just generally everywhere (not necessarily on this or other SE sites, even in every day life), so what is this 'hammer'? I ...
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1answer
37 views

“… of the major” or “… major”, what's the difference?

I am just looking at a text review and we are unable to agree on what would be the best way of saying between the examples in the title. What is the difference between this: this study focuses on ...
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4answers
220 views

Is there a word to describe the following emotion?

Heiii lovely people, could anyone perhaps tell me whether there is a word to describe such an emotion. An emotion when you feel sad or disappointed due another person's success because: A. you desire ...
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1answer
97 views

Did I hear “indiscreet or in discreet vs indiscrete or in discrete”? [closed]

I was watching "Miss Marple" on pbs and there is one conversation between inspector and a lady as one of house member. A lady was showing specific room to an inspector who is looking for some pictures ...
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1answer
62 views

Another phrase for “The land and its people”

I am writing a book on tourism and have a section that talks about the land, its cuisine, language, culture, festivals etc. Is there a phrase that can act as a section header? I am avoiding a cliché ...
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2answers
653 views

Are “on par” and “in parity” equivalent expressions?

In an unrelated reply to one of my questions, someone used the following expression type. x and y are on par while x and z are not I use a similar expression (see below). However, I'm curious if ...
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1answer
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How do I say “flexibility with time” on my CV?

Similar to this question, but slightly different. I'm trying to convey the willingness to work flexible hours. I'm translating from Spanish for a friend of mine. A literal translation of ...
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1answer
64 views

What to use for 'first unimpressive but later better'?

I will explain a few situations : It is often the case that I listen to a song which doesn't impress me in the first minute or so but as it progresses, I like it A trained batsmen struggles in the ...
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2answers
103k views

How to correctly use the expression “safe travel(s)”?

A colleague of mine recently reached out to me. I asked if he would like to meet up sometime to which he notified me that he would be traveling the remainder of this week. In what context is it okay ...
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3answers
668 views

How do you properly define and use the phrase, “buy into”?

I found this line while I was reading: That commercial said that this product would help me lose weight in one week. I’m not buying into that idea. While I somehow understood the meaning of the ...
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1answer
781 views

“Charges levied” Actually a thing?

I am positive I've heard of "charges levied," as in "criminal charges brought against" (e.g. the sentence "The charge levied against my client is unfounded."). However, while searching for a ...
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2answers
395 views

Can we use “I can put you down..” when enlisting someone for an appointment?

For example, "I can put you down on a weekend tour." As far as i know, when you use the phrase "Put you down" it's more of embarrassing someone or it could also mean that you want to kill that ...
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1answer
368 views

How to request someone to start a process?

I am an engineer dealing with other companies(vendors). Our company has to sign a Non-Disclosure agreement(NDA) with the vendor before we start any discussion. Now, the NDA signing is a process that ...
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5answers
140 views

Is there a one-word for an act of proactively introducing oneself?

I work for a technology company, and we are associating with another company. So this guy from the other company wrote me an email introducing himself and offering to help me out with anything I ...
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2answers
88 views

What is a good pejorative term for people incapable of analytical thinking?

What do you call a person, who can't think logically, and - as a result - tells you how to fix symptom X without even trying to analyze its causes (your computer doesn't work - restart it, if it ...
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3answers
78 views

An alternative word for “non-evaluativeness”

I'm looking for an alternative word to use instead of "non-evaluativeness" which is long and not very common. Any ideas are appreciated. Example: Non-evaluativeness: Abstract should report the ...
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1answer
69 views

Repeated phrases such as 'four times it stopped on the very threshold of the gate, four times the armour clanged' [duplicate]

I was wondering if there is a phrase or word for this language technique. Virgil, and other classical poets use it quite a lot. For example 'three times she lifted herself on her elbow. Three ...
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3answers
273 views

(go) off the boil

"(go)off the boil" seems to mean "past the crisis" in British English. What is the origin/etymology of this expression? Is it used nowadays?
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1answer
293 views

Usage of “scared,” “fear of,” “afraid of/to,” and “concerned to” [closed]

Could anybody please explain me when can I use 'afraid', 'fear of', 'scared', 'concern', 'worried' to express a situation that i can't handle or out of my reach? Explain also please which one of the ...
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2answers
64 views

Use of “on the grounds” in the context of a government decision

The following sentence comes from a foreign publication. It sounds wrong to me, but I am not a native English speaker. Is it grammatically and idiomatically correct? The government banned ...
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2answers
114 views

Am I syntactically wrong in these sentences? [closed]

I have recently written a few sentences for discussion of rhetorical ways in writing. The outcome turned out to be so unexpected that I was blamed for how wrong I syntactically was. So I cordially ...