Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (5)

0
votes
1answer
329 views

I don't understand the difference between slightly and a bit? [closed]

What is the difference in meaning or usage between slightly and a bit? For example, the sentence: I thought she was younger than me, but in fact she proved to be even slightly older. Is ...
0
votes
2answers
158 views

What is the correct visualization of “first left down the hallway”?

I hear a lot of native speakers say something like this: Once in the arena take first left down the hallway Take your first left down the hallway. When you come to the second floor, make a left and ...
0
votes
1answer
175 views

When advertisers say product X has N times less 'thing' than product Y, what do they mean [duplicate]

Here is an example: NESTLÉ a+ SLIM Milk has 15 times less fat than regular toned milk. Source:http://www.nestle.in/brands/nestleaplusslim So the question is this: say regular toned milk has 100 ...
0
votes
2answers
73 views

“What this thing was” vs “what was this thing” [duplicate]

Example: What this new plan was I had no idea. What was this new plan I had no idea. What's the difference between the two? Is one more common than the others?
0
votes
1answer
73 views

What does “Slash the life” mean?

What does the expression "Slash the life" mean? I'm Brazilian and I'm trying to understand what is the meaning of this expression, since I've found it in a music piece that seems to have a positive ...
0
votes
2answers
180 views

“Any object in A and B”—What does it mean?

Does "any object in A and B" in English mean any object in A and any object in B; any object in A or any object in B; or any object in the intersection of A and B? Thanks a lot. Another ...
0
votes
1answer
85 views

Looking for concise and precise terms for feedback rating options

I am designing a user reputation system that will be an essential piece of an online marketplace for peer-to-peer item rentals. The user reputation system is based on the collection of feedbacks given ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

What does “The young graduate student was bright and eager, but green to the power of data structures.” mean?

The following sentence is from the "The Algorithm Manual" book The young graduate student was bright and eager, but green to the power of data structures. What does the green to the power of ...
0
votes
1answer
90 views

Paternity vs. Paternal vs. Parental Leave [closed]

Which one is the most commonly used to describe a leave taken by a father in the United States?
0
votes
1answer
61 views

What is the inverse of an orphan? [duplicate]

An orphan is a child whose parents have died. Is there a single English word to describe a parent who has lost all their children? If not, what is the most clear and concise description for this ...
0
votes
2answers
48 views

Meaning of 'insider hiring' [closed]

there is an article about hiring. http://www.haaretz.com/misc/iphone-article/.premium-1.637980 one of the headers is 'Insider hiring'. what does it exactly mean? hiring someone you know? does it have ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Become / get, successfully / effectually, together / common / united [closed]

Currently I'm looking for a product name. The goal of this product is that everyone can get successful with the power of a network (together, united) But I don't know which combination makes sense: ...
0
votes
4answers
114 views

Survey Question

I have drafted an internal employee survey focused around "inclusion". One of the questions has been vetoed incorrect by my supervisor, while I maintain that the original is grammatically correct. ...
0
votes
1answer
189 views

Is “would you be keen to consider___?” too cheesy to use?

On a formal / professional email, is the following question acceptable, or is it too much politeness it looks unprofessional? The intention is to ask someone, who is not a subordinate, to do ...
0
votes
1answer
857 views

Is “By one side, …, by the other side” a correct expression?

I've come across the formulation by one side, by other side instead of on the one hand/side and on the other hand/side. I strongly suspect this to be wrong and maybe Brazilian Portuguese originated, ...
0
votes
1answer
337 views

What does “a riff on Shakespeare” mean?

I have a pretty good idea of what this means already. For example, Beckett's riff on Hamlet in Waiting for Godot: What are we doing here, that is the question. But I'd like to be a little more ...
0
votes
4answers
369 views

What is a word or expression for a person who feels free? [closed]

As in they feel unrestrained, like they could do anything?
0
votes
2answers
287 views

“Turn slightly right” or “Turn slight right”

This is a grammatical question. For a route navigation, which expression is better to say? "slight" is adjective and "slightly" is adverb, so I guess "Turn slightly right" would be the correct in ...
0
votes
4answers
514 views

Alternatives to “yet on the other hand”

I just read "yet on the other hand" in a published research article and it seemed off to me. Is it just me? Is there a better alternative? Specifically: The yet seems to be redundant to on the other ...
0
votes
5answers
103 views

Usage of “persons”

I know pretty well that the plural for 'person' is 'people'. But my literature professor used once the word 'persons' because, he said, he was using the word the same as it will be used 'individuals'. ...
0
votes
2answers
74 views

What is a “turkey walk”?

I once read that a "turkey walk" was going to be held on a Sunday at 8.00 a.m. in a small town in New England. I tried to find it in dictionaries and I also googled the expression, but got no ...
0
votes
1answer
146 views

mistakes in set phrases; “…you have to celebrate the victory of your spoils…”

Is there a word for mistaken use of a set phrase? For example, I heard an interview with an athlete in which he said "...you have to celebrate the victory of your spoils." Of course, this is not how ...
0
votes
3answers
104 views

You really want to help someone, but that individual becomes suspicious of the nature of your help and questions it

I don’t know what to call the behavior of those who don’t believe that anybody acts with good intentions, so I'm looking for a suitable word, idiom or expression.
0
votes
2answers
911 views

What is the origin of “choke in the clutch”?

I've seen this phrase in several sports stories recently, and I believe it goes back several decades. The phrase can probably be broken into two parts: choke and clutch. I know choking refers to ...
0
votes
3answers
236 views

Is there a noun(phrase) meaning 'the state' of being a masterpiece?

'Masterpiece' is a noun. I would like, however, to use a noun or a concise noun phrase which refers not to a masterpiece, but its state of being a masterpiece. I thought of using 'masterpieciness' as ...
0
votes
1answer
286 views

What words can I use to express a “great time”? [closed]

What words can I use to express a "great time"? I am trying to write an essay and I just need words that expresses a great time to make the essay sound interesting.
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Having an IV or being on a drip

I had an IV last night because my blood pressure dropped too low. I was given an IV (Fluids) last night... I was put on a drip last night... I got a drip last night... I was on a drip last night ... ...
0
votes
2answers
300 views

what does “in quiet sophistication” mean here?

"it strikes me as the last word in quiet sophistication." I have two questions here. First, I do not understand the meaning of "quiet sophistication." I know that sophistication is a trait ...
0
votes
1answer
451 views

What does the phrase “fence building” mean?

What does the English phrase "fence building" mean? Ex. usage: "You're gonna have to do some fence building.", which, from the context I heard it in (relationships between friends), seems to have the ...
0
votes
2answers
448 views

Saying about good and bad [duplicate]

Is there a saying or a quote, when something good happen thanks to something bad ? Like you meet someone because you've lost someone else ?
0
votes
3answers
121 views

How can you say you realize something from someone's look?

What is a word or phrase that means you understand something from someone's look, e.g. you realize from their look that you should stop talking?
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“As I go” expression

Could anyone please tell me what "as I go" means? Like in the following context: I will fill it out as I go.
0
votes
1answer
103 views

On the right path?

Suppose someone is trying to solve some math problem and he has the right idea to attack it, but still need more time to figure out details. When I want to encourage him, should I use "You are on the ...
0
votes
2answers
287 views

Most number of items vs Most items [closed]

Consider this phrase, would you write this: The bucket containing the most items or in this form: The bucket containing the most number of items Some information here: ...
0
votes
1answer
84 views

Why do we say 'He is Fred to a t'? [duplicate]

I used to think it was only a British idiom. But I read an article in the New York Times stressing how important tea was to the British army in Iraq. Apparently there is even a special attachment on ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

precede versus take precedence of

I would like to describe the relationship between two start dates. I have been repeatedly using "start date of A precede the start date of B." I am wondering if an alternative expression "start date ...
0
votes
2answers
138 views

turn right backward or turn slightly right backward?

Please see the image. When giving directions, how should I describe what the arrow indicates on the road? My ideas are turn right backward turn slightly right backward I'm not sure if they ...
0
votes
2answers
162 views

What does “the balcony is really far away” mean?

Yesterday, I watched MasterChef America. There were two teams competing in the challenge of cooking and serving food at a football game. There were 100 voters and the red team won the blue team by 51 ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Can “to me” be used adverbially?

[...] which, to me, has a strong [...] Provided that the excerpt above is correct regarding the commas, can I omit them? As in: [...] which to me has a strong [...]
0
votes
3answers
194 views

Does this expression makes sense? [closed]

W : I'm impressed at how expertly you played that piano sonata. M : Sorry. I'm still just an apprentice. When the man says "sorry", what does this exactly mean in this circumstances? Is it ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

When something sounds too good to be true, it is or isn't?

I'm having a hard time understanding why the phrase is when something sounds too good to be true, it is and not when something sounds too good to be true, it isn't Because "when something ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

What is a term for an invalid comment which is claimed to be the cause to something? [closed]

A comment that isn't related and ultimately doesn't make sense. E.g., someone doesn't clear the garden and another person calls him by "dude, are you a woman/dog/cat...etc. (you could put any word ...
0
votes
3answers
196 views

Is there a principle for the word order of idioms e.g. Town & Gown rather than Gown & Town? [closed]

The second version sounds awkward but I don't know why? So is there any rule for these idioms e.g. reverse alphabetical order e.g. Walkie Talkie? Is there a name for these? Just found another ...
0
votes
1answer
239 views

How to say we provide a synopsis here for details refer to other work in formal academic writing

We provide here a synopsis of the measurement process, for an in-depth description, please refer to XYZ. I'm not a native speaker. How do I write that as the first sentence of a chapter in an ...
0
votes
2answers
147 views

Other expressions for 'be down on someone'

I'm looking for other expressions or saying to describe when someone is ill-disposed towards someone else, but mainly on a prejudice rather than for objective reasons.
0
votes
2answers
460 views

What does absent fraud mean? [duplicate]

I came across the phrase absent fraud in this article. I searched for its meaning on Google but didn't find anything. What does absent fraud mean? I can’t help but empathize with an employee ...
0
votes
2answers
291 views

Is “on-parade” an actual term?

A google search came up with almost nothing. Am I just imaging things? I could have sworn one could use the term "on-parade" to mean a succession of something. For example: Life is an on-parade of ...
0
votes
3answers
761 views

Principle Of Life

I would like to understand what is meant by this expression: I often asked myself, did the principle of life proceed? This sentence came in the following context: When I had arrived at this ...
0
votes
2answers
6k views

Knocked up, two very different meanings. But why and how did the phrase split? [duplicate]

In American English, "Knocked up" means "pregnant." I just found out via an article regarding jobs that no longer exist that in British English, they use use the phrase "Knocked up in a completely ...
0
votes
2answers
358 views

How to express the trend in this graph using the appropriate phrases?

I have this graph and I want to describe the difference in the take off trajectory of two patterns in the figure below. The first pattern is seen in the first two parameters over the years from the ...